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Presentation on theme: "Presentation Plus! The American Vision Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Send all."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Presentation Plus! The American Vision Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Send all inquiries to: GLENCOE DIVISION Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8787 Orion Place Columbus, Ohio 43240 Welcome to Presentation Plus!

3 Splash Screen

4 Contents Chapter Introduction Section 1A Clash of Values Section 2Cultural Innovations Section 3African American Culture Chapter Summary Chapter Assessment Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides.

5 Intro 1 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

6 Intro 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Explain the rise in racism and nativism in the 1920s. Describe the clash of values in the 1920s and the changing status of women. Section 1: A Clash of Values

7 Intro 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 2: Cultural Innovations Describe the explosion of art and literature and the disillusionment of 1920s artists. Summarize the effects of sports, movies, radio, and music on popular culture.

8 Intro 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives Section 3: African American Culture Describe the Harlem Renaissance and the rediscovery of African American cultural roots. Explain the increase in African American political activism.

9 Intro 7 Why It Matters The 1920s was an era of rapid change and clashing values. Many Americans believed society was losing its traditional values, and they took action to preserve these values. Other Americans embraced new values associated with a freer lifestyle and the pursuit of individual goals. Writers and artists pursued distinctively American themes, and the Harlem Renaissance gave African Americans new pride.

10 Intro 8 The Impact Today The 1920s left permanent legacies to American culture. National celebrities in sports and film emerged. Jazz music became part of American culture. F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway wrote classics of American literature. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

11 Intro 9 continued on next slide

12 Intro 10

13 End of Intro

14 Section 1-1 Guide to Reading During the 1920s, clashes between traditional and modern values shook the United States. anarchist Main Idea Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Key Terms and Names eugenics Ku Klux Klan Emergency Quota Act flapper Fundamentalism evolution creationism police powers speakeasy

15 Section 1-2 Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Organizing As you read about Americans reactions to immigrants in the 1920s, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 610 of your textbook by filling in the causes and effects of anti-immigrant prejudices. Explain the rise in racism and nativism in the 1920s. Reading Objectives Describe the clash of values in the 1920s and the changing status of women.

16 Section 1-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Continuity and Change The rapid changes of the early 1900s challenged Americans who wanted to preserve traditional values.

17 Section 1-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

18 Section 1-5 Nativism Resurges Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. In the 1920s, racism and nativism increased. Immigrants and demobilized military men and women competed for the same jobs during a time of high unemployment and an increased cost of living. Ethnic prejudice was the basis of the Sacco and Vanzetti case, in which the two immigrant men were accused of murder and theft. (pages 610–612)

19 Section 1-6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. They were thought to be anarchists, or opposed to all forms of government. Sacco and Vanzetti were sentenced to death, and in 1927 they were executed still proclaiming their innocence. Nativists used the idea of eugenics, the false science of the improvement of hereditary traits, to give support to their arguments against immigration. Nativism Resurges (cont.) (pages 610–612)

20 Section 1-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Nativists emphasized that human inequalities were inherited and said that inferior people should not be allowed to breed. This added to the anti-immigrant feeling of the time and further promoted the idea of strict immigrant control. The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) led the movement to restrict immigration. Nativism Resurges (cont.) (pages 610–612)

21 Section 1-7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. This new Klan not only targeted the freed African Americans but also Catholics, Jews, immigrants, and other groups believed to have un-American values. Because of a publicity campaign, by 1924 the Ku Klux Klan had over 4 million members and stretched beyond the South into Northern cities. Scandals and poor leadership led to the decline of the Klan in the late 1920s. Politicians supported by the Klan were voted out of office. Nativism Resurges (cont.) (pages 610–612)

22 Section 1-8 What led to a resurgence of racism and nativism in the United States after World War I? During the early 1920s, an economic recession, an influx of immigrants, and racial and cultural tensions led to an atmosphere of disillusionment and intolerance. Many Americans saw immigrants as a threat to the status quo of traditional American values. Immigrants and demobilized military men and women competed for the same jobs during a time of high unemployment and an increased cost of living. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Nativism Resurges (cont.) (pages 610–612)

23 Section 1-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Controlling Immigration In 1921 President Harding signed the Emergency Quota Act, limiting immigration to 3 percent of the total number of people in any ethnic group already living in the United States. This discriminated heavily against southern and eastern Europeans. The National Origins Act of 1924 made immigrant restriction a permanent policy. (page 612)

24 Section 1-10 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The act lowered the quotas to 2 percent of each national group living in the U.S. in 1890. This further restricted immigrants from southern and eastern Europe. The act exempted immigrants from the Western Hemisphere from the quotas. The immigration acts of 1921 and 1924 reduced the labor pool in the United States. Controlling Immigration (cont.) (page 612)

25 Section 1-11 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Employers needed laborers for agriculture, mining, and railroad work. Mexican immigrants began pouring into the United States between 1914 and the end of the 1920s. The immigrants fled their country in the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Controlling Immigration (cont.) (page 612)

26 Section 1-13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How did the Newlands Reclamation Act of 1902 help bring Mexican immigrants to the United States? This act provided funds for irrigation projects in the Southwest. This led to a need for large numbers of agricultural laborers for factory farms. Since the National Origins Act of 1924 limited immigration from southern and eastern Europe but not from the Western Hemisphere, Mexican immigrants looking for jobs and political freedom poured into the United States. Controlling Immigration (cont.) (page 612)

27 Section 1-14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The New Morality A new morality challenged traditional ideas and glorified youth and personal freedom. New ideas about marriage, work, and pleasure affected the way people lived. Women broke away from families as they entered the workforce, earned their own livings, or attended college. The automobile gave American youth the opportunity to pursue interests away from parents. (pages 612–614)

28 Section 1-15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Womens fashion drastically changed in the 1920s. The flapper, a young, dramatic, stylish, and unconventional woman, exemplified the change in womens behavior. The New Morality (cont.) (pages 612–614) She smoked cigarettes, drank illegal liquor, and wore revealing clothes. Professionally, women made advances in the fields of science, medicine, law, and literature.

29 Section 1-17 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How did the automobile encourage the new morality? The automobile led to the independence of many youths. As a result, many American youths spent time away from family to socialize with friends. The New Morality (cont.) (pages 612–614)

30 Section 1-18 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Fundamentalist Movement Some Americans feared the new morality and worried about Americas social decline. Many of these people came from small rural towns and joined a religious movement called Fundamentalism. The Fundamentalists rejected Darwins theory of evolution, which suggested that humans developed from lower forms of life over millions of years. (pages 614–615)

31 Section 1-19 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Instead, Fundamentalists believed in creationism–that God created the world as described in the Bible. In 1925 Tennessee passed the Butler Act, which made it illegal to teach anything that denied creationism and taught evolution instead. The Fundamentalist Movement (cont.) (pages 614–615)

32 Section 1-20 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The debate between evolutionists and creationists came to a head with the Scopes Trial. Answering the request of the ACLU, John T. Scopes, a biology teacher, volunteered to test the Butler Act by teaching evolution in his class. After being arrested and put on trial, Scopes was found guilty, but the case was later overturned. After the trial, many fundamentalists withdrew from political activism. The Fundamentalist Movement (cont.) (pages 614–615)

33 Section 1-21 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How did the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) cause the clash between the evolutionists and the creationists? The ACLU raised money to test the Butler Act, and it asked for a volunteer who would purposely teach evolution in the classroom. (pages 614–615) The Fundamentalist Movement (cont.)

34 Section 1-22 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Prohibition Many people felt the passage of the Eighteenth Amendment, which prohibited alcohol, would reduce unemployment, domestic violence, and poverty. The Volstead Act made the enforcement of Prohibition the responsibility of the U.S. Treasury Department. Until the 1900s, police powers–a governments power to control people and property in the publics interest, had been the job of the state governments. (pages 615–616)

35 Section 1-22 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Prohibition (cont.) Americans ignored the laws of Prohibition. They went to secret bars called speakeasies, where alcohol could be purchased. Crime became big business, and gangsters corrupted many local politicians and governments. (pages 615–616)

36 Section 1-22 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. In 1933 the ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment ended Prohibition. It was a victory for modernism and a defeat for supporters of traditional values. (pages 615–616) Prohibition (cont.)

37 Section 1-22 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. (pages 615–616) Prohibition (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How were Prohibition and crime related? Organized crime ran most of the speakeasies. Bootlegging–the illegal production and distribution of alcohol–was common. Gangsters smuggled alcohol into the United States, and violence occurred as gangs fought to control the liquor trade. Some gangsters gained enough money and power to corrupt local politicians.

38 Section 1-23 Checking for Understanding __ 1.the scientific theory that humans and other forms of life have evolved over time __ 2.person who believes that there should be no government __ 3.the belief that God created the world and everything in it, usually in the way described in Genesis __ 4.a place where alcoholic beverages are sold illegally __ 5.a young woman of the 1920s who showed freedom from convention, especially in dress A.anarchist B.flapper C.evolution D.creationism E.speakeasy Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. A D C E B

39 Section 1-24 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Explain why the Eighteenth Amendment was repealed. People recognized that Prohibition was not successful. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

40 Section 1-25 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Continuity and Change How did the passage of the Eighteenth Amendment and the Volstead Act change the federal governments role? The federal government obtained police powers to enforce the law.

41 Section 1-26 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Synthesizing Why were immigrants from Mexico not included in the quota system set by the immigration acts? They provided cheap labor.

42 Section 1-28 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing Photographs Study the image on page 616 of your textbook of the federal agent destroying barrels of alcohol. Why do you think the barrels were destroyed in public with a crowd watching? They were destroyed in public to intimidate people, hoping to make them fearful and submissive in the face of federal authority.

43 Section 1-29 Close Explain the resurgence, impact, and decline of the Ku Klux Klan.

44 End of Section 1

45 Section 2-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading An era of exciting and innovative cultural trends, the 1920s witnessed changes in art and literature. This period also saw a dramatic increase in the countrys interest in sports and other forms of popular culture. Bohemian Main Idea Key Terms and Names Carl Sandburg Eugene ONeill Ernest Hemingway F. Scott Fitzgerald mass media

46 Section 2-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Organizing As you read about the 1920s, complete a graphic organizer like the one on page 620 of your textbook by filling in the main characteristics of art, literature, and popular culture that reflect the era. Describe the explosion of art and literature and the disillusionment of 1920s artists. Reading Objectives Summarize the effects of sports, movies, radio, and music on popular culture.

47 Section 2-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Culture and Traditions American culture in the 1920s saw a rise in both the arts and popular entertainment.

48 Section 2-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

49 Section 2-5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Art and Literature Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. During the 1920s, American artists, writers, and intellectuals began challenging traditional ideas as they searched for meaning in the modern world. The artistic and unconventional, or Bohemian, lifestyle of Manhattans Greenwich Village and Chicagos South Side attracted artists and writers. (pages 620–622)

50 Section 2-6 These areas were considered centers of creativity, enlightenment, and freedom from conformity to old ideas. The European art movement influenced American modernist artists. The range in which the artists chose to express the modern experience was very diverse. Art and Literature (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 620–622)

51 Section 2-7 Writing styles and subject matter varied. Chicago poet Carl Sandburg used common speech to glorify the Midwest and the expansive nature of American life. Playwright Eugene ONeills work focused on the search for meaning in modern society. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Art and Literature (cont.) (pages 620–622)

52 Section 2-9 How did F. Scott Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby portray modern society? The book exposed the emptiness and superficiality of modern society as the characters spent much of their lives chasing futile dreams. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Art and Literature (cont.) (pages 620–622)

53 Section 2-10 Popular Culture Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The economic prosperity of the 1920s afforded many Americans leisure time for enjoying sports, music, theater, and entertainment. Radio, motion pictures, and newspapers gave rise to a new interest in sports. Sports figures, such as Babe Ruth and heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey, were famous for their sports abilities but became celebrities as well. (pages 622–623)

54 Section 2-11 Motion pictures became increasingly popular. The first talking picture, The Jazz Singer, was made in 1927. The golden age of Hollywood began. The mass media–radio, movies, newspapers, and magazines–helped break down the focus on local interests. Mass media helped unify the nation and spread new ideas and attitudes. Popular Culture (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 622–623)

55 Section 2-13 How did popular culture in the United States change during the 1920s? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Popular Culture (cont.) (pages 622–623)

56 Section 2-13 The economic prosperity of the 1920s afforded many Americans leisure time for enjoying sports, music, theater, and entertainment. Radio, motion pictures, and newspapers gave rise to a new interest in sports. Sports figures became celebrities. Motion pictures became increasingly popular. The first talking picture, The Jazz Singer, was made in 1927. The golden age of Hollywood began. The mass media–radio, movies, newspapers, and magazines–broke down the focus on local interests. Mass media helped unify the nation and spread new ideas and attitudes. Popular Culture (cont.) (pages 622–623)

57 Section 2-19 Checking for Understanding __ 1.a person (as an artist or writer) leading an unconventional lifestyle __ 2.a medium of communication (as in television and radio) intended to reach a wide audience A.Bohemian B.mass media Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. B A

58 Section 2-20 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Describe the main themes of artists and writers during the 1920s. The main themes of artist and writers during the 1920s were disenchantment, isolation, disillusionment, and emptiness.

59 Section 2-21 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Culture and Traditions How did writers, artists, and popular culture of the 1920s affect traditional ideas in the United States? They broke down patterns of narrow focus on local interest.

60 Section 2-22 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Synthesizing How did World War I influence the literature written during the 1920s? It led many writers to portray disillusionment and to reevaluate the myths of American heroes.

61 Section 2-24 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Interpreting Art Study the Edward Hopper painting, Nighthawks, on page 621 of your textbook. How do different elements of this piece work to convey a sense of isolation? One man eats by himself, there are only three customers in the diner, there is only one person working at the diner, and there are not people on the sidewalk or in the street.

62 Section 2-25 Close Summarize the effects of sports, movies, radio, and music on popular culture.

63 End of Section 2

64 Section 3-1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading During World War I, the prospect of employment and greater freedoms spurred the Great Migration of African Americans from the rural South to industrial cities in the North. Great Migration Main Idea Key Terms and Names Harlem Renaissance Claude McKay Langston Hughes jazz Cotton Club blues Marcus Garvey

65 Section 3-2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Organizing As you read about the African American experience in the 1920s, complete a graphic organizer similar to the one on page 626 of your textbook by filling in the causes and effects of the Harlem Renaissance. Describe the Harlem Renaissance and the rediscovery of African American cultural roots. Reading Objectives Explain the increase in African American political activism.

66 Section 3-3 Guide to Reading (cont.) Section Theme Groups and Institutions African Americans played stronger political and cultural roles in the 1920s than they had in previous decades.

67 Section 3-4 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

68 Section 3-5 The Harlem Renaissance The Great Migration occurred when hundreds of thousands of African Americans from the rural South headed to industrial cities in the North with the hope of a better life. (pages 626–628)

69 Section 3-6 In large northern cities, particularly New York Citys neighborhood of Harlem, African Americans created environments that stimulated artistic development, racial pride, a sense of community, and political organization, which led to a massive creative outpouring of African American arts. The Harlem Renaissance (cont.) (pages 626–628) This became known as the Harlem Renaissance. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

70 Section 3-7 Writer Claude McKay became the first important writer of the Harlem Renaissance. His work expressed defiance and contempt of racism, which were very strong writing characteristics of this time. Langston Hughes became the leading voice of the African American experience in the United States. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Harlem Renaissance (cont.) (pages 626–628)

71 Section 3-7 Louis Armstrong introduced jazz, a style of music influenced by Dixieland music and ragtime. He became the first great cornet and trumpet soloist in jazz music. A famous Harlem nightspot, the Cotton Club, was where some famous African American musicians, such as Duke Ellington, got their start. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Harlem Renaissance (cont.) (pages 626–628)

72 Section 3-7 Bessie Smith sang about unrequited love, poverty, and oppression, which were classic themes in blues style music. This soulful style of music evolved from African American spirituals. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. The Harlem Renaissance (cont.) (pages 626–628)

73 Section 3-8 What was the Harlem Renaissance? In large northern cities, particularly New York Citys neighborhood of Harlem, African Americans created environments that stimulated artistic development, racial pride, a sense of community, and political organization, which led to a massive creative outpouring of African American arts. This became known as the Harlem Renaissance. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. The Harlem Renaissance (cont.) (pages 626–628)

74 Section 3-9 African American Politics Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. After World War I, many African Americans wanted a new role in life and in politics. The Great Migration led to African Americans becoming powerful voting blocs, which influenced election outcomes in the North. Oscar DePriest was elected as the first African American representative in Congress from a Northern state after African Americans voted as a block. (pages 629–630)

75 Section 3-10 The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) battled against segregation and discrimination. The NAACPs efforts led to the passage of anti-lynching legislation in the House of Representatives, but the Senate defeated the bill. African American Politics (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 629–630)

76 Section 3-11 Jamaican black leader Marcus Garveys idea of Negro Nationalism glorified black culture and traditions. He founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), which promoted black pride and unity. Garvey encouraged education as the way for African Americans to gain economic and political power; but he also voiced the need for separation and independence from whites. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. African American Politics (cont.) (pages 629–630)

77 Section 3-11 Garveys plan to create a settlement in Liberia in Africa for African Americans caused middle class African Americans to distance themselves from Garvey. His ideas, however, led to a sense of pride and hope in African Americans that resurfaced during the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. African American Politics (cont.) (pages 629–630)

78 Section 3-12 What was Marcus Garveys Negro Nationalism? Garveys idea of Negro Nationalism glorified black culture and traditions. He founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association, which promoted black pride and unity. He encouraged education as the way for African Americans to gain economic and political power; but he also voiced the need for separation and independence from whites. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. African American Politics (cont.) (pages 629–630)

79 Section 3-23 Checking for Understanding __ 1.style of music evolving from African American spirituals and note for its melancholy sound __ 2.American style of music that developed from ragtime and blues and which uses syncopated rhythms and melodies A.jazz B.blues Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. A B

80 Section 3-24 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Explain how Bessie Smiths music conveyed universal themes. Bessie Smith sang of love, poverty, and oppression.

81 Section 3-24 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Explain the importance of the defeat of Judge John Parkers nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. Judge John Parkers defeat showed the political strength of African Americans.

82 Section 3-24 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Describe the goals of Marcus Garveys Universal Negro Improvement Association. The association emphasized black pride and a separate African American society.

83 Section 3-25 Reviewing Themes Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Groups and Institutions What actions did the NAACP take to expand political rights for African Americans? They lobbied and worked through the courts.

84 Section 3-26 Critical Thinking Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Synthesizing How did the Great Migration affect the political power of African Americans in the North? The Great Migration affected the political power of African Americans in the North by creating a strong voting bloc.

85 Section 3-27 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Analyzing How did Duke Ellington create a new musical style that grew out of the ragtime tradition? Duke Ellington used distinctive orchestration and improvisation to create a new musical style. Critical Thinking (cont.)

86 Section 3-28 Analyzing Visuals Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Examining Photographs Study the pictures on page 628 of your textbook of the Cotton Club and African Americans posing by their car. What are some elements of these pictures that show African Americans adopting part of the 1920s social culture? The style of clothing they wore indicates they were adopting part of the 1920s social culture.

87 Section 3-30 Close Explain the increase in African American political activism.

88 End of Section 3

89 Chapter Summary 1

90 End of Chapter Summary

91 Chapter Assessment 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 1.a place where alcoholic beverages are sold illegally __ 2.American style of music that developed form ragtime and blues and which uses syncopated rhythms and melodies __ 3.the belief that God created the world and everything in it, usually the way described in Genesis __ 4.person who believes that there should be no government __ 5.a person (as an artist or writer) leading an unconventional lifestyle A.anarchist B.eugenics C.flapper D.evolution E.creationism F.police powers G.speakeasy H.Bohemian I.mass media J.jazz J E G A H

92 Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms (cont.) Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 6.a governments power to control people and property in the interest of public safety, health, welfare, and morals __ 7.a pseudo-science that deals with the improvement of hereditary qualities of a race or breed __ 8.the scientific theory that humans and other forms of life have evolved over time B D F A.anarchist B.eugenics C.flapper D.evolution E.creationism F.police powers G.speakeasy H.Bohemian I.mass media J.jazz

93 Chapter Assessment 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Reviewing Key Terms (cont.) Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. __ 9.a medium of communication (as in television and radio) intended to reach a wide audience __ 10.a young woman of the 1920s who showed freedom from convention, especially in dress C I A.anarchist B.eugenics C.flapper D.evolution E.creationism F.police powers G.speakeasy H.Bohemian I.mass media J.jazz

94 Chapter Assessment 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts Why was there a rise in racism and nativism in the 1920s? There was a rise in racism and nativism because of an influx of immigrants and a recession.

95 Chapter Assessment 4 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What actions did Congress and the president take during the first half of the 1920s to restrict immigration? They enacted the Emergency Quota Act and the National Origins Act

96 Chapter Assessment 5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What role did the automobile play in changing the way that young people in the United States lived and socialized? The automobile allowed them to escape parents control.

97 Chapter Assessment 6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What was the Fundamentalist movement? It was a religious movement to reassert the Bibles authority in life.

98 Chapter Assessment 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Reviewing Key Facts (cont.) What were two reasons for the rise in African American political activism? The Harlem Renaissance and the African American experience in World War I contributed to the rise in African American political activism.

99 Chapter Assessment 8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking Analyzing Themes: Groups and Institutions In what ways did the new morality change American family life? The new morality increased youths independence and allowed women to develop a personal identity that was demonstrated in work and fashion.

100 Chapter Assessment 9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Critical Thinking (cont.) Interpreting Why was Charles Lindbergh a symbol of modern America? His solo flights restored Americans belief in the courageous, pioneering individual.

101 Chapter Assessment 10 Geography and History The circle graphs below show immigration numbers in the United States in 1921 and 1925. Study the graphs and answer the questions on the following slides.

102 Chapter Assessment 11 Interpreting Graphs What significant changes in immigration do the circle graphs show? They show a dramatic increase in the percentage of immigrants form Latin America and a dramatic decrease in the percentage of immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe. Geography and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

103 Chapter Assessment 12 Geography and History (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Applying Geography Skills Why did these changes in immigration occur between 1921 and 1925. There were changes in immigration laws.

104 Chapter Assessment 13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Directions: Choose the best answer to the following question. Which of the following trends of the 1920s did NOT contribute to a renewed nativist movement? AEconomic recession BInflux of immigrants CFear of radicals and Communists DFundamentalism Test-Taking Tip First you must be clear on the meaning of nativism. Then use the process of elimination to rule out the one answer that seems the least related to the definition of nativism.

105 End of Chapter Assessment

106 History Online Explore online information about the topics introduced in this chapter. Click on the Connect button to launch your browser and go to The American Vision Web site. At this site, you will find interactive activities, current events information, and Web sites correlated with the chapters and units in the textbook. When you finish exploring, exit the browser program to return to this presentation. If you experience difficulty connecting to the Web site, manually launch your Web browser and go to http://tav.glencoe.com

107 F/F/F 1-Fact New Words The youth culture of the twenties produced a number of new words and phrases that became a part of their own language. In the mid-1920s, partygoers urged fellow dancers to Get hot! Get hot! Young Americans also invented such terms as beauts, cats pajamas, and cats whiskers to describe attractive young women. The terms lounge lizards, jelly beans, and jazzbos described attractive young men, while the phrase hard-boiled eggs described tough guys. Prohibition also expanded American vocabulary. Bootlegger, speakeasy, and hip flask became part of common speech. It also gave new meaning to the words wet and dry.

108 FYI Contents 1 Miss America Aimee Semple McPherson Tennessee Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.

109 FYI 1-1a The first Miss America was crowned in 1921. It seems fitting that sixteen-year-old Margaret Gorman was from the nations capital– Washington, D.C.

110 FYI 1-2b Charismatic preacher Aimee Semple McPherson gained added notoriety for a five-week disappearance she claimed was a kidnapping and for the many lawsuits filed against her in the following years, often for libel or slander.

111 FYI 1-3c Tennessees law against teaching evolution remained on the books until 1967.

112 Moment in History 1 Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

113 You Dont Say 3-1 All That Jazz The origin of the term jazz is one notable dispute in American English. It may have come from the word Chaz, the nickname of an early ragtime drummer named Charles Washington, or from chasse, a kind of dance step. African and Creole sources are also possibilities.

114 CT Skill Builder 1 Synthesizing Information The authors of your textbook gathered information from many sources to present a story of how the United States came about and how the countrys people lived. To combine the information into a logical story, the authors used a process called synthesis. Being able to synthesize information can be a useful skill for you as a student when you need to gather data from several sources for a report or a presentation. Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

115 CT Skill Builder 2 Learning the Skill The skill of synthesizing involves combining and analyzing information gathered from separate sources or at different times to make logical connections. Follow these steps to synthesize information: Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Synthesizing Information Select important and relevant information. Analyze the information and build connections. Reinforce or modify the connections as you acquire new information.

116 CT Skill Builder 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Learning the Skill (cont.) Suppose you need to write a research paper on the status of women in the 1920s. You would need to synthesize what you learn to inform others. You could begin by detailing the ideas and information you already have about the status of women in the1920s. A graphic organizer such as the one on page 617 of your textbook could help categorize the facts. Then you could select an article about women in the 1920s, such as the one on the following slide. Synthesizing Information

117 CT Skill Builder 4 In 1923 the National Womans Party first proposed an equal rights amendment to the Constitution. This amendment stated that men and women shall have equal rights throughout the United States and every place subject to its jurisdiction. The National Womans party pointed out that legislation discriminating against women existed in every state.... Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Synthesizing Information Some progressive women reformers, however, opposed the goals of the National Womans Party. These progressives favored protective legislation, which had brought shorter hours and better working conditions for many women. The efforts of the progressives helped defeat the equal rights amendment. Learning the Skill (cont.)

118 CT Skill Builder 5 Practicing the Skill Use the graphic organizer below and the passage on the previous slide to answer the following questions. Synthesizing Information

119 1.What information is presented in the table? 2.What is the main idea of the passage? What information does the passage add to your knowledge of this topic? CT Skill Builder 6 The status of women in the 1920s is presented in the table. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers. Synthesizing Information An amendment dedicated to womens rights was proposed in 1923, but it was defeated with the help of women who opposed it. Practicing the Skill (cont.)

120 CT Skill Builder 7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. 3.By synthesizing the two sources and using what you know from reading Section 1 of Chapter 20 in your textbook, what conclusions can you draw about the role of women in 1920s society? Women pursued social freedom, entered the workforce, and made contributions in medicine, literature, and science. Synthesizing Information Practicing the Skill (cont.)

121 TAV Video 1 The Harlem Renaissance Objectives Click in the small window above to show a preview of The American Vision video. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Understand that 1920s Harlem was the center of an artistic revival. Realize that the Jazz Age allowed African Americans to be recognized for their cultural contribution to the country. Know that jazz has influenced such modern musical movements as rap and hip-hop. After viewing The Harlem Renaissance, you should:

122 TAV Video 2 Discussion Questions Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Who were William Johnson, Lois Mailou Jones, and Jacob Lawrence? William Johnson, Lois Mailou Jones, and Jacob Lawrence were famous artists during the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance

123 TAV Video 3 Discussion Questions Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What current musical styles were influenced by jazz? Rap and hip-hop are two current musical styles influenced by jazz. Jazz also had an influence on rock and soul music. The Harlem Renaissance

124 M/C 1-1

125 Why It Matters Transparency

126 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

127 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

128 Daily Focus Skills Transparency 3 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

129 End of Custom Shows WARNING! Do Not Remove This slide is intentionally blank and is set to auto-advance to end custom shows and return to the main presentation.

130 End of Slide Show


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