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Research has shown that Social Emotional Learning (SEL) has an impact on every aspect of children's development: their health; ethical development, citizenship,

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Presentation on theme: "Research has shown that Social Emotional Learning (SEL) has an impact on every aspect of children's development: their health; ethical development, citizenship,"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Research has shown that Social Emotional Learning (SEL) has an impact on every aspect of children's development: their health; ethical development, citizenship, academic learning and motivation to achieve. Promoting Childrens Ethical Development through Social and Emotional Learning, CASEL –University of Illinois

3 Presenters Alison Adler Ed.D. Chief, Safety and Learning Environment Kim C. Williams Assistant Director, Prevention Center Diane E. Curtis Specialist, Prevention Center Kimberly AllenSpecialist, Department of Safe Schools June Z. EassaSpecialist, Prevention Center

4 SINGLE SCHOOL CULTURE © PROCESS Create a Single School Culture © BEHAVIOR ACADEMICS CLIMATE

5 Gangs Homeless Abuse Divorce PovertyAlcohol Tobacco Weapons Pregnancy Drugs

6 Risk Factor Chart DomainRisk Factors Individual/Peer Alienation/rebelliousness Friends who engage in problem behavior Favorable attitudes toward problem behavior Family Family management problems Family conflict Family history School Early academic failure Early conduct problems Lack of commitment to school/poor school affiliation Community Availability of drugs/and or weapons Community laws and norms favorable toward problem behavior Low neighborhood attachment and community disorganization Severe economic deprivation

7 Protective Factor Chart DomainProtective Factors Caring and Support Nurturing staff and positive role models Creative, supportive school leadership Peer support, cooperation and mentoring Personal attention and interest from teachers Warm, responsive school climate High Expectations Minimum mastery of basic skills Emphasis on higher order academics Avoidance of negative labeling and tracking Opportunities for Meaningful Participation Leadership and decision-making by students Student participation in extracurricular activities Parent and community participation in instruction Culturally diverse curricula and experiences

8 Protective Factors The personal, social and institutional resources that promote adolescent development or buffer risk factors that might otherwise compromise development… (Garmezy & Rutter, 1985) The conditions that foster the development of resiliency in youth… (Benard, 1991)

9 Single School Culture © for Climate A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education Prevention Center Initiatives Life Skills – Working with Others Standards -Displays effective interpersonal communication skills -Demonstrates leadership skills -Uses conflict resolution techniques -Works well with diverse individuals and in diverse situations -Contributes to the overall effort of a group Benchmarks -Demonstrates respect for others in the group -Engages in active listening -Effectively resolves conflicts of interest -Works well with different ethnic groups -Displays empathy with others -Enlists others in working toward a shared vision Character Education Educational Enhancement Groups (EEG) Student Success Skills - FAU Too Good for Drugs Safe Schools Ambassadors Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) Alternatives to Suspension FACE IT Red Ribbon Week Brown Ribbon Month Unitedstreaming Bullying Prevention Conflict Resolution Peer Mediation School Based Team (SBT) Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory, Colorado, Kendall & Marzano

10 Single School Culture © for Climate American School Counselor Association National Standard Personal/Social Prevention Center Initiatives Standard A - Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes and inter- personal skills to help them understand and respect self and others. Standard B - Students will make decisions, set goals and take necessary actions to achieve goals. Standard C - Students will understand safety and survival skills. Character Education Educational Enhancement Groups (EEG) Student Success Skills - FAU Too Good for Drugs Safe Schools Ambassadors Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) Alternatives to Suspension FACE IT Red Ribbon Week Brown Ribbon Month Unitedstreaming Bullying Prevention Conflict Resolution Peer Mediation School Based Team (SBT)

11 Motivationally ready & able Not very motivated/ lacking prerequisite knowledge & skills/ minor vulnerabilities Avoidant / very deficient in current capabilities. Has a disability/ major health problems Barriers to Learning Range of Learners (categorized in terms of their response to academic instruction) I = II = III = Instructional Component (a)Classroom Teaching (b)Enrichment Activity Desired Outcomes Examples of Barriers: Negative attitudes toward schooling Deficiencies in necessary prerequisite skills Disabilities School and community deficiencies Lack of home involvement Lack of peer support Peers who are negative influences Lack of recreational opportunities Lack of community involvement Inadequate school support services Inadequate social support services Inadequate health support services (Adelman and Taylor, 1998) Why Should We Do It?

12 S ocial and E motional L earning (SEL) Emotions affect how and what we learn Relationships provide foundation for learning Promotes attachment to school Positive effects on academic performance Benefits to physical health Essential for lifelong success Demanded by employers Risk of maladjustment, failed relationships, unhappiness reduced Promoting Childrens Ethical Development through Social and Emotional Learning, CASEL –University of Illinois

13 SEL Outcomes Related to School Success Performance Increases in achievement over time Better problem solving and planning Improved learning-to-learn skills Attitudes Better sense of community (bonding) Higher academic motivation and aspirations Increased understanding of consequences of behavior Behavior Increase in prosocial behavior Reductions in aggression and disruptions Lower rate of conduct problems Promoting Childrens Ethical Development through Social and Emotional Learning, CASEL-University of Illinois

14 SCHOOL CLIMATE & CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Prior research from Add Health has shown a strong association between school connectedness and every risk behavior we studied. Improving the Odds Schools as a Source of Risk and Protection – Robert Blum RESULTS - Factors Associated with School Connectedness :

15 LEVEL 1 Systems of Prevention Primary prevention (low end need/low cost per student programs) LEVEL 2 Systems of Early Intervention Early-after-onset (moderate need, moderate cost per student programs) LEVEL 3 Systems of Care Treatment of severe and chronic problems (high end need/ high cost per student programs) Interconnected systems for meeting the needs of all students

16 SCHOOL BASED TEAM Multidisciplinary team to support students academic, social, behavioral, and emotional growth and development. The team utilizes a systematic approach that is student and family centered; solution focused; and culturally competent.

17 SCHOOL BASED TEAM Referrals Parent, Administration, Teacher, Coach, Student, School Counselor, ESE, Nurse, ESOL, School Police, etc. Interventions Academics: Tutorial, Supplemental Academic Instruction, etc. Behavior: Conflict Resolution, Alternative to Suspension, Alternative Education, etc. Climate: Parent Involvement, Mental Health Providers, Foster Care, Prenatal Care, Community Partners, etc.

18 SCHOOL BASED TEAM (SBT) TESTIMONIAL BILL THOMPSON, Principal Forest Park Elementary School

19 MULTI-DEPARTMENTAL INTEGRATION Exceptional Student Education (Response to Intervention) Supplemental Educational Services Student Success Skills Student Development Plan Alternative Education (Procedures Manual) Multicultural Education Elementary Education Secondary Education

20 Community Agencies Agencies have Cooperative Agreements to provide behavioral health services Agency staff must sign the SBT attendance log and confidentiality statement Agency staff are background checked by School Police Agency staff must be covered by insurance Agency staff must maintain confidentiality about student/school issues Agency staff, Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) or Department of Children and Families (DCF) may be invited to attend the meeting by SBT

21 DATA ELEMENTS Safe Schools Alert and Acknowledgement Systems for Youth (SSAASY) Risk Overview School Based Team Action Plan TERMS School Based Team Tracking Detail (L24) Information Highway (L25) EDW SSAASY Reports Secured Information Highway

22 SSAASY RISK OVERVIEW

23 Any High School

24 PANEL: ___ L24. SBT TRACKING DETAIL SCREEN YEAR: 06 Thursday August 11, 2005 2:43 pm STDT: ________ SCHL: GR: REF NUM REF DATE REFERRED BY TEACHER REFERRAL CODE REF CODE DESCRIPTION SCH TCH NAME ____________________________ SBT TEAM MT DT _____________ SBT TEAM RECOM ____ ____ ____ ___ ____ C/L ASSIGNED ___________ REVIEW DATE PLEASE HIT ENTER AFTER SECTION WAS UPDATED SBT TEAM MT DT __________ SBT TEAM RECOM ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ C/L ASSIGNED _______ REVIEW DATE _____________ PLEASE HIT ENTER AFTER SECTION WAS UPDATED SBT TEAM MT DT _______ SBT TEAM RECOM ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ C/L ASSIGNED ______ REVIEW DATE ________ CLOSE CASE Y/N? CASE CLOSE DATE ______ EVENT NUMBER: PF1=HELP PF3=EXIT PF10=DELETE PLEASE TYPE KEY ELEMENTS. TERML: Z257

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