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Page 1 April 27, 2006 Board Engagement Session A2 Values/Vision/Experiences/Outcome Standards Oakland Unified School District Redesign.

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Presentation on theme: "Page 1 April 27, 2006 Board Engagement Session A2 Values/Vision/Experiences/Outcome Standards Oakland Unified School District Redesign."— Presentation transcript:

1 Page 1 April 27, 2006 Board Engagement Session A2 Values/Vision/Experiences/Outcome Standards Oakland Unified School District Redesign

2 Page 2 Outcomes: Review process by which we arrived at the draft values, vision, experiences, and student outcome standards statements Clarify process for finalizing values, vision, experiences, and student outcome standards statements Gather Board input on values, vision, experiences, and student outcome standards key content Review (planning, calendar, context) (3 minutes) Approach (4 mins) Values (5 mins) Vision (5 mins) Experience of students, teachers, parents/caregivers (15 mins) Student outcome standards (10 mins) Next steps (3 minutes) Agenda Getting started

3 Page 3 Phased approach for engaging board leadership Outcomes for Phase A –Commitment to phased planning approach and good faith relationship –Clarity on Expect Success! redesign approach and rationale –Familiarity with Expect Success! budget, principles and project management structure –Creation of protocols and role clarity to successfully engage board in building and leading the Educational Organization –Collaborative decision-making on identified pending decisions –Agreements reached on other mechanisms to support board engagement (agenda setting, data requirements, communication, milestone tracking, other resources and tools) –Agreement on the role of the board in important decisions for Phase B Meeting norms Pending key decisions –Vision, values and outcome standards –ELO Strategic Plan approval –Membership and structure of unique networks (adult ed, early childhood, special ed, charter schools) Review of planning approach Getting started

4 Page 4 Board retreat (April 22, 2006) Foundational Strategies #1 and #2 Vision, values, and outcome standards introduced Key decisions pending Data needs protocol Carried over items: Data needs protocol Service organization build Board retreat (May 9, 2006) Foundational Strategies #3 and #4 Expect Success! design principles, resources and project management Board communication protocols Board retreat (June 3, 2006) Foundational changes #5 and #6 Milestones and tracking protocols Debrief Phase A and agreements Complete Board meeting (April 27, 2006) Vision, values, and outcome standards adopted Board meeting (May 10, 2006) MAAP and ComPAS draft benchmark standards and goals RBB - school allocations Board meeting (May 31, 2006) RBB - service area and department allocations ELO membership Board meeting (June 14, 2006) Public hearing on budget Board meeting (June 14, 2006) Budget adoption Board meeting (July, 2006) Strategic Plan first reading Calendar (tentative) Getting started Pre-Reading

5 Expect Success! The Education Leadership Org (ELO) The Services Org The School Board Parents/care- givers Teachers Student Key partners in student success

6 Page 6 Vision of the district Student Outcome Standards Key partner experiences Vision for our students Values Network standards, strategies and plans School site plans Strategy Group standards, strategies and plans Vision for our district Context for values, vision, experiences and student outcome standards

7 Page 7 Approach for finalizing values, vision, experiences and student outcome standards Vision, values and outcome standards 1.Pre-reading –(Values, vision, experiences, and student outcome standards) 2.Review evolution of values, vision and experience statements with Board 3.Discuss current values, vision and experience statements with Board –Identify any gaps and/or major revisions –Collect and document all Board member input 4.Staff to draft language in response to board input and present back to board 5.Final board approval

8 Page 8 Values Vision, values and outcome standards

9 Page 9 Values must guide the vision It is important that staff and the board have a shared understanding of what values we share in pursuing the vision. (Alliance for Nonprofit Management) Pre-Reading Vision, values and outcome standards

10 Page 10 Core Values (from strategic plan) high expectationsEvery student and adult must feel safe, valued, and challenged to meet high expectations equity of opportunityEvery student deserves equity of opportunity to thrive in a school that expects him or her to perform at high levels Continuous learningContinuous learning and inquiry are keys to exceptional performance, individually and collectively supportownership accountability for resultsCentral office support and greater school site ownership increase accountability for results diversityThe diversity and genuine engagement of our community are sources of strength for our schools that must be honored and protected LeadershipLeadership throughout the school community is imperative for educating all students to high levels and for creating strong, effective schools Sustained commitmentSustained commitment to the common good is vital to perpetual success for our schools and our community Vision, values and outcome standards Pre-Reading

11 Page 11 Values held by OUSD executive leadership (agreed to at 2005 Summer leadership retreat) 6.Leadership throughout the school community is imperative for educating all students to high levels and for creating strong, effective schools 7.Sustained commitment to the common good is vital to perpetual success for our schools and our community 8.Our students and adults must always reach for high levels of achievement 9.Our work, our success, and our vision connect us to one another. Each of us must continuously improve our ability to serve our students, our community and one another 10.All of us create safe space to let our school leaders, students, parents and staff take needed risks for all of us to achieve 1.Every student and adult must feel safe, valued, and challenged to meet high expectations 2.Every student deserves equity of opportunity to thrive in a school that expects him or her to perform at high levels 3.Continuous learning and inquiry are keys to exceptional performance, individually and collectively 4.Central office support and greater school site ownership increase accountability for results 5.The diversity and genuine engagement of our community are sources of strength for our schools that must be honored and protected Pre-Reading Vision, values and outcome standards

12 Page 12 1.Equity: All means all –Fairness and excellence –Opportunity and results –Different inputs to reach the similarly high outcomes –Removing the barriers to learning and achievement for all 2.Community: It takes us all –Families, schools shared responsibility for student success –All the resources of the citybusiness, community, neighborhoods, and nonprofitsfocused on educating students 3.Learning: Always getting better –Using data to drive improvements and identify best practices –Using results to guide decision making –Aligning incentives to continuous learning and improvement Draft OUSD Core Values Vision, values and outcome standards

13 Page 13 OUSD Values - discussion Considering the work that has already been done by staff and community members … which values are most important to name/highlight? Equity Community Accountability Learning Others? Vision, values and outcome standards

14 Page 14 Vision Vision, values and outcome standards

15 Page 15 The Importance of a Vision John Bryson, the author of Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations, states that typically, a vision is "more important as a guide to implementing strategy than it is to formulating it." This is because the development of strategy is driven by what you are trying to accomplish, your organization's purposes. A vision statement should be realistic and credible, well articulated and easily understood, appropriate, ambitious, and responsive to change. It should orient the group's energies and serve as a guide to action. It should be consistent with the organization's values. In short, a vision should challenge and inspire the group to achieve its mission. Pre-Reading Vision, values and outcome standards

16 Page 16 OUSD Vision (from strategic plan) High Standards of learning… High Standards of service. Vision, values and outcome standards Pre-Reading

17 Page 17 Embraces the concept of high standards of learning, high standards of service Identifies the beneficiaries: all students, each and every one of them Offers a vision of being the best: world class Is measurable: we have already begun benchmarking OUSD against the best urban school districts ( We aim to be: The best urban school district in California by 20_?.) States that we must work together as a city community to educate children And identifies and embraces common values Rationale for draft OUSD vision statement (Determined at the Summer 2005 OUSD Leadership retreat) Vision, values and outcome standards Pre-Reading

18 Page 18 We are creating a world class public school system that educates all students to high standards of learning, in partnership with our community, based in the resurgence of Oakland, (with a recommitment to our shared values of equity, community, and learning.) Draft OUSD Vision Vision, values and outcome standards

19 Page 19 OUSD Vision - discussion What key values/ideas should be reflected in the vision? What do you like about the draft vision statement? What is missing from the draft vision statement that seems important? What should not be in the vision statement? Vision, values and outcome standards

20 Page 20 Key partner experience statements Vision, values and outcome standards

21 LAN-EBO To From TO ENSURE THE NEW OUSD LOOKS AND FEELS DIFFERENT FOR STUDENTS Create great schools Create a new support system Teachers Parents, families, and peers Student Create a new culture Student Getting by, just doing my work – busy work Not being expected to do challenging work, nor being taught how to do it successfully Only a small number of students actually expected to graduate, succeed and achieve A focus only on what you dont know, do not have and cannot do (deficit oriented) Feeling isolated and/or unsafe in schools – not known or respected Learning to high standards and motivated to work hard Feeling that teaching prepares you to engage challenging work successfully Graduating with real choices, every student ready for college, employment, and citizenship A focus on what you do know, care about, and must do to be successful (asset oriented) Known well and respected by peers and adults, physically and emotionally safe Experience Statements (as a result of feedback in community meetings) Pre-Reading

22 Page 22 Being world class means that our students will experience (from adults and/or peers): 1.Love, care, respect and personal and physical safety 2.Rigorous and relevant learning and high expectations 3.Acceptance as unique people who need to exercise their passions, talents and interests to thrive Draft student experiences statement Vision, values and outcome standards

23 Page 23 OUSD student experiences statements - discussion What do you like about the draft student experiences statements? What is missing? What should not be included? Vision, values and outcome standards

24 LAN-EBO TO ENSURE THE NEW OUSD LOOKS AND FEELS DIFFERENT FOR TEACHERS Create great schools Create a new support system Teachers Parents, families, and peers Student Create a new culture Teachers... To From... Lack of collaboration, feeling isolated in the classroom without a sense of community Incoherent curriculum, teaching one way to all students Unsupportive conditions – no time and support to learn new strategies Feeling blamed for low student achievement without hope for improvement Disrespected and undervalued High turnover or professional burnout on the job Teams of unique professionals collaborating in professional communities Coherent curriculum, teaching personalized to help all learners succeed Conditions allow excellent instruction and collaboration Supported to use data and student work to continuously improve performance Respected and valued Little turnover, structured opportunities for renewal and professional development Pre-Reading Experience Statements (as a result of feedback in community meetings)

25 Page 25 Being world class means that our teachers will experience 1.A professional work environment with access to the materials, tools, training, and resources to achieve excellence 2.Time for learning, reflection and collaboration with parents,students and peers in order help individuals and groups of students achieve 3.Respect and appreciation for doing a good job (a challenging job), including a career track that rewards performance and competitive salaries and benefits 4.An authentic role in creating the conditions in their schools for everyones success Draft teacher experiences statement Vision, values and outcome standards

26 Page 26 OUSD teacher experiences statements - discussion What do you like about the draft teacher experiences statements? What is missing? What should not be included? Vision, values and outcome standards

27 LAN-EBO TO ENSURE THE NEW OUSD LOOKS AND FEELS DIFFERENT FOR FAMILIES AND PRIMARY CAREGIVERS Create great schools Create a new support system Teachers Parents, families, and peers Student Create a new culture Parents, families, and peers... To From... Limited or no alternatives when schools are not right for their children No clear information about educational attainment Schools disconnected from the community Parents disconnected from teachers and schools, unsure how to best support their childs learning Central office staff seems inaccessible, decision making invisible, communication ineffective and last minute At least 2 quality school options for every family and student Clear standards for student learning and achievement Schools feel like welcoming, active centers of community life Parents and teachers feel like partners, working together to support the student Clear processes for decision making, clear and timely information, user-friendly services Pre-Reading Experience Statements (as a result of feedback in community meetings)

28 Page 28 Being world class means that our parents/caregivers will experience 1.Clear, timely and accurate information about student progress, options for learning, and for what teachers, parents and students need to do to be successful 2.Support and training so that they can fully participate in their childrens education and hold high expectations for their students and their schools (knowing what grade level work and good teaching look like) 3.Respect and full inclusion in key decisions that affect their childrens learning and education 4.A culture of high expectations and attention to the hopes, dreams and aspirations of students and families Draft parent/care-giver experiences statement Vision, values and outcome standards

29 Page 29 OUSD parent/caregiver experiences statements - discussion What do you like about the draft parent/caregiver experience statements? What is missing? What should not be included? Vision, values and outcome standards

30 Page 30 Outcome Standards Vision, values and outcome standards

31 Page 31 Why identify student outcome standards? Business, higher education, and the complexity of social and political life demand higher standards for what students should know and are able to do. The difference in earning potential between high school graduates and college graduates has widened over the last two decades. What families want for their children includes more than academic successthey want them to be successful human beings. Successful systems identify the student qualities and competencies they are looking for so that the learning reflects community values. Pre-Reading Vision, values and outcome standards

32 Page 32 Define what will be true for every student A profile of the successful student we intend to graduate Constitutes a guarantee for which we share accountability Align and guide everybodys workespecially the work of students, teachers and primary caregivers/families (for students) Express what is truly important, if difficult to quantify Show what students need to do now to prepare for their future See Appendix for background Characteristics of outcome standards (a.k.a, Essential Learning Results, Student Outcomes, or Profiles of a Successful Graduate) Vision, values and outcome standards Pre-Reading

33 Page 33 CaringAcademic PreparationThriving, Full productive human beings Cross-cultural Skill and ability world citizen - Students exhibiting empathy (1) - Respectful behavior; sympathy towards others - Enthusiastic about learning; resilient, confidant, self- directed (5) -Student activity participation - High self-esteem (2) - Social competence - Safe - Solve problems peacefully - Schools relate to student need - Relentless effort from teachers - Students demonstrate bravery, stand up for what is just and fair - Students exhibit positive behaviors toward others - Teachers create conditions for success - Readiness for kindergarten - Literacy Prof. by Grade 3 - Numeracy Prof. by Grade 3 - Writing & Speaking Prof. by Grade 8 - Success in Algebra by Grade 8 - A-G/ College Ready/ Access - Knowledge of Spanish - Truly prepared for college (5) - Students have future options (2) - Students are prepared for their careers - Information literacy - Resources -Enthusiastic rigor is the model in classroom - Teachers provide access in classroom (?) - Students are self-motivated - Self monitoring - Students have a range of choices post-high school (2) - Students use their voices to help make decisions - Encouraged by all - Find their niche - Ability to tackle rigors - Excited and see no limits (2) - Love learning - Appreciate the arts - Identify passions/ set goals (2) - All elements from caring are needed for students to thrive - Students have balanced viewpoints - Students have an informed career development plan (1) - Exhibiting growth and success in their endeavors - Resourceful in solving life problems (1) - Respectful in understanding self, environment, new people (6) - Open to new ideas and problem solving with others - Demonstrated understanding of cultural relativism (1) - Max. other students experiences in classrooms - Sharing across culture; foster relationships outside of own group (2) - Bilingual and read, write, and think in another language Desired student outcomes (Identified by ELO leadership April 2006) Pre-Reading

34 Page 34 The experiences of students, teachers and parents in OUSD will allow students to become: 1.Become enthusiastic and passionate learners who are resilient, confident and self directed; able to set and achieve personal goals 2.Know and be able to do the challenging intellectual work demanded by college, employment, civic participation and community membership 3.Know and respect themselves, other people, and the environment-- able to lead healthy lives and thrive 4.Become global citizens who exhibit cultural competence, personal responsibility and empathy; who form strong relationships inside and outside of their own group 5.Make informed choices about their current and future lives and what is meaningful for them as human beings (consolidated from prioritized list of outcomes standards ELO developed 4/5/06) Draft student outcome standards (from 2006 ELO retreat) Vision, values and outcome standards

35 Page 35 OUSD student outcome standards - discussion What do you like about the draft student outcome standards? What is missing? What should not be included? Vision, values and outcome standards

36 Page 36 Next steps for finalizing values, vision, experiences and student outcome standards Vision, values and outcome standards 1.Pre-reading –(Values, vision, experiences, and student outcome standards) 2.Review evolution of values, vision and experience statements with Board 3.Discuss current values, vision and experience statements with Board –Identify any gaps and/or major revisions –Collect and document all Board member input 4.Staff to draft language in response to board input and present back to board 5.Final board approval

37 Page 37 Appendix: Student Outcome Standards Pre-Reading Vision, values and outcome standards

38 Page 38 Garden Groves mission and vision provide guidance and direction… The Board of Education of the Garden Grove Unified School District is committed to providing an educational program focusing on student achievement, high standards, and opportunities for all students to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to live a productive life. --GGUSD website, To meet this commitment, students will participate in a comprehensive curriculum designed to achieve the identified goals. It is the goal of the district to ensure that all students have the opportunity upon leaving high school to choose from a wide variety of options including four-year colleges and universities, technical education, or a skilled career. The opportunity to choose among these paths requires that students achieve proficiency as defined by state standards in core academic subjects and achieve proficiency in the use of the English language. These proficiencies will make it possible for students to access rigorous high school courses and enable them to graduate ready for college and skilled careers. Appendix Pre-Reading

39 Page 39 Virginias Norfolk School District Mission To ensure the success of each student in a safe, stimulating, and challenging environment supported with a committed workforce that focuses on quality teaching and learning. We Believe All students will learn All students will be held accountable for acceptable behavior and respecting peers and adults All personnel within the organization will be held accountable for ensuring that decision-making is data- driven and congruent with the district's vision, mission, and goals Meaningful professional development is critical to quality work performance Cultural diversity and learning styles of students will be recognized, and enhanced alternative education programs are essential for students Data analysis is critical to examining existing practices, programs, and initiatives for continuous improvement All students, staff, parents, and community members are ambassadors for the school system Appendix Pre-Reading

40 Page 40 For several decades now, universities, community leaders and industry have been demanding more of graduates Three out of every 10 ninth-grade students will not graduate on time and about half of all African American and Hispanic ninth graders leave school without a diploma. Nearly 40 percent of students who do graduate say they don't feel adequately prepared for college or work. Our failure to prepare the next generation for success is an affront to our nation's values of equality and opportunity for all, and it threatens our economic and civic health. --The Urban Institute To succeed in these high- paying, high-growth jobs, college students or employees must be able to write and speak clearly, analyze information, conduct research, and solve difficult problems, according to the American Diploma Project. These skill requirements are the same whether a high school graduate goes directly to work or to college. See for yourself the challenging kinds of workplace tasks and college assignments that are now commonplace at work and on campus. American Diploma Project workplace tasks college assignments kills/openform Appendix Pre-Reading

41 Page 41 In 1991 the CA Business Roundtable told educators what they wanted in high school graduates Competencies Resource skills Interpersonal skills Information skills Systems thinking Technology skills The Foundation Basic skills Thinking skills Personal qualities Parents must insist that their sons and daughters master this know- how and that their local schools teach it. Unless you do, your sons and daughters are unlikely to earn a decent living. If your children do not learn these skills by the time the leave high school, they face bleak prospects dead end work interrupted only by periods of unemployment, with little chance to climb a career ladder. --US Dept of Labor, June, 1991 Appendix Pre-Reading

42 Page 42 Every successful school district plans for the future: to be successful, what will our students need to know and be able to do when they graduate? From Bethel Public Schools, Spanaway, Washington, 2006 Technology Outcomes Personal Outcome Intrapersonal Outcome Thinking Skills Outcome Resources Outcome Systems Outcome Connections Outcome Appendix Pre-Reading

43 Page 43 Not everything of importance can be measured While it is true that students will have limited options if they do not pass A-G course work. It is NOT true that all students who achieve A-G completion are ready for college, life or employment The jobs that once awaited high school graduates have all but disappeared. We must prepare our students for the world of the future; the world of the fifties and sixties no longer exists Appendix Pre-Reading

44 Page 44 Western Association of Schools and Colleges B. STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING: CURRICULUM (WHAT ARE STUDENTS LEARNING?) 1. All students participate in a rigorous, relevant, and coherent standards-based curriculum that supports student achievement of the Hawaii Content and Performance Standards and the General Learner Outcomes through successful completion of any courses of study offered. 2. All students have equal access to the schools entire program and assistance with a personalized education plan to prepare for the pursuit of academic, individual and school-to-career goals. 3. Students shall meet all the requirements for graduation upon completion of the high school program. Appendix Pre-Reading

45 Page 45 Dimensions of Learning Robert Marzano, MCREL The five Dimensions of Learning are: 1.Attitudes and perceptions Attitudes and perceptions affect students' abilities to learn. A key element of effective instruction is helping students establish positive attitudes and perceptions about the classroom and learning. 2.Acquire and Integrate Knowledge Helping students acquire and facilitate new knowledge is another important aspect of learning. When students are learning new information, they must be guided in relating the new knowledge to what they already know, organizing that information, and then making it a part of their long-term memory. When students are acquiring new skills and processes they must learn a model, or set of steps, then shape the skill or process to make it efficient and effective for them. They must finally internalize or practice the skill or process so they can perform it easily. 3.Extend and Refine Knowledge Learners develop in-depth understanding through the process of extending and refining their knowledge, by making new distinctions, clearing up misconceptions and reaching conclusions. They analyze what they have learned by applying reasoning processes that will help them extend and refine the information. Some of the common reasoning processes used by learners to extend and refine their knowledge are: –Comparing, Classifying, Abstracting, Inductive reasoning, Deductive reasoning, Construction support, Analyzing errors, Analyzing perspectives 4.Use Knowledge Meaningfully The most effective learning occurs when we use knowledge to perform meaningful tasks. Making sure that students have the opportunity to use knowledge meaningfully is one of the most important parts of planning a unit of instruction. In the DOL model there are six reasoning processes around which tasks can be constructed to encourage the meaningful use of knowledge: –Decision making, Problem solving, Invention, Experiential inquiry, Investigations, Systems analysis 5.Habits of Mind The most effective learners have developed powerful habits of mind that enable them to think critically, think creatively and regulate their behavior. Appendix Pre-Reading


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