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Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center www.the-eco- center.org Using the Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form Presentation.

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Presentation on theme: "Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center www.the-eco- center.org Using the Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form Presentation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center center.org Using the Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form Presentation Modified by Dee Gethmann Iowa Department of Education October 2006 Author of Original Presentation: Kathy Hebbeler ECO Center at SRI International

2 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 2 Overview Why collect Early Childhood Outcomes data? Understanding Early Childhood Outcomes Measuring Childrens Accomplishments of the 3 Early Childhood Outcomes Using the Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form Practice with the Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form

3 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 3 Iowas Early Childhood Outcomes Purpose: Develop and Implement a Statewide Accountability System to Measure Outcomes for Infants and Toddlers in Early ACCESS and Preschoolers in Early Childhood Special Education

4 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 4 Early Childhood Outcomes: Target Population Early ACCESS Infants and Toddlers All infants and toddlers that have an IFSP Include children when transitioning at the age of 3 Early Childhood Special Education Preschoolers All preschool children that have an IEP Include children when transitioning from ECSE services to kindergarten Include children receiving ECSE services and Kindergarten services (Part-Time/Part-Time) Does NOT include children that begin receiving special education services in kindergarten

5 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 5 The Essential Question Are students with disabilities entering school ready to learn at high levels?

6 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 6 Why Collect Early Childhood Outcomes Data?

7 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 7 How will this make a difference for children and families? System of Accountability: Looking at Results Requirement to report in IDEA 2004 Provide information to the public Data Reported by AEA and LEA Document effectiveness of Early ACCESS and Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) services

8 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 8 How will this make a difference for children and families? System of Accountability: Looking at Results Provide leadership to advance assessment practices and data use Improve developmentally appropriate practices, instruction and outcomes for children (EC Blueprint) Use data to plan and implement effective curricula, assessments, and interventions (EC Blueprint)

9 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 9 Understanding Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO)

10 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 10 Three Early Childhood Outcomes Areas Children with IFSP/IEP who demonstrate improved: 1. Positive social-emotional skills (including social relationships) 2. Acquisition and use of knowledge and skills (including early language/communication and early literacy for preschoolers) 3. Use of appropriate behaviors to meet their needs

11 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 11 The 3 ECO Areas Refer to the Whole Child Represent Critical Skills that: Promote positive outcomes for young children Support active and successful participation in everyday activities and routines, now and in the future Integrate all areas of development Prepare children to enter school ready to learn at high levels (The Essential Question)

12 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 12 Thinking Functionally (within age-expected bounds) Not just…. Know how to make eye contact, smile, and give a hug Know how to imitate a gesture when prompted by others Use finger in pointing motion Show a skill in a specific situation But does he/she… Initiate affection toward caregivers and respond to others affection Watch what a peer says or does and incorporate it into his/her own play Point to indicate needs or wants Use a skill in actions across settings and situations to accomplish something meaningful to the child

13 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 13 ECO Area #1: Children have positive social-emotional skills Involves: Relating with adults Relating with other children For older children - following age appropriate rules, limits, and routines Participates/contributes as part of a group Includes areas like: Attachment/separation/ autonomy Expressing emotions and feelings Social interactions and play

14 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 14 ECO Area #2: Children acquire and use knowledge and skills Involves: Thinking Reasoning Remembering Problem-solving Using symbols and language Understanding physical and social worlds Includes: Early concepts – symbols, pictures, numbers, classification, spatial relationships Pre-writing – scribbling, shapes, pictures, letters Object permanence Expressive language and communication

15 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 15 ECO Area #3: Children use appropriate behaviors to meet their needs Involves: Taking care of basic needs Getting about in the environment Daily living skills In older children, contributing to their own safety, fitness, and health care Includes: Integrating motor skills to complete tasks Self-help skills (e.g., dressing, feeding, grooming, toileting, household responsibility) Acting on the world to get what one wants Engaging in play Persisting in activities

16 Children have positive social- emotional skills Children acquire and use knowledge and skills Children use appropriate behaviors to meet their needs Relation- ships with adults Relation- ships with peers Follows group rules Symbol use, abstract thinking Problem Solving Strategies Listening Play Exploring Playing Being curious Practicing Touching Attending Engaging Persisting Understand and Use Communicati on Self-care, health and safety CHILDRENS DEVELOPMENT IS INTERCONNECTED Masters the environ- ment

17 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 17 How do we describe the ECO Areas in Iowa? Iowas Alignment of: Early Childhood Outcome Areas IFSP Outcome/IEP Goal Codes used in IFSP/IEP Results Iowa Early Learning Standards February 2006, Iowa Dept. of Education

18 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 18

19 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 19 ECO Will Help Us Look at Our Results to Ensure… Early ACCESS/ECSE is… Making a difference for children and families …so that children with developmental delays and disabilities are entering school ready to learn at high levels

20 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 20 Measuring Childrens Accomplishment of the 3 Early Childhood Outcomes

21 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 21 Measuring Childrens Accomplishments What is Assessment in Early Childhood? Assessment is a generic term that refers to the process of gathering information for decision-making. (McLean, 2004)

22 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 22 DEC Recommended Practices for Assessment Involves multiple measures e.g., observations, criterion-curriculum- based instruments, interviews, curriculum- compatible norm-referenced scales, informed clinical opinion, work samples Involves multiple sources e.g., families, professional team members, service providers, caregivers, physicians DEC = Division for Early Childhood (a division of the Council for Exceptional Children)

23 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 23 Use of Multiple Measures and Multiple Sources… Iowa refers to this as RIOT Record Reviews Interviews Observations Tests/Assessments

24 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 24 Examples Measures Reports Medical Interviews Parent Interview Observations Time Sampling Tests/Assessments Example: Curriculum- based assessments (e.g., Creative Curriculum Child Observation Assessment) IFSP/IEP Results Sources Parents and family members Service providers Therapists Physicians Child care providers ECSE Teachers People familiar with the child across settings and situations

25 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 25 Include Families Input from Families is Critical Family members see the child in situations that professionals do not

26 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 26 Multiple Measures and Sources Need to Address Childrens Functioning ECO Areas Reflect: Functioning across a variety of settings and situations that make up the childs day Typical functioning, not childs capacity to function under ideal circumstances Many pathways to demonstrate accomplishments for children with atypical development (e.g., using sign language, wheel chair). Include any assistive technology or supports the child typically uses

27 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 27 Challenges in Measuring Childrens Accomplishments There is not one measure that will assess the 3 ECO Areas directly Many child assessments are organized around developmental domains Thus, the need to gather information using Multiple Measures from Multiple Sources

28 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 28 Key Points Assumption: Children can be described in regard to how close they are to age expected behaviors and skills for each of the 3 ECO areas By definition, most children in the general population demonstrate the ECO areas in an age-expected way By providing services and supports, Early ACCESS/ECSE is trying to move children closer to age expected behavior

29 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 29 Summarizing Childrens Accomplishments ECO Summary Form is used by IFSP/IEP Teams to Summarize this Information

30 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 30 Using the Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO) Summary Form… Summarizing information from multiple methods and sources

31 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 31

32 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 32

33 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 33 The ECO Summary Form When do Teams complete the ECO Summary Form? Initial IFSP and IEP Meetings Annual Review, Re-Evaluation and Exit Meetings Must complete when children are leaving or exiting services Transition from Early ACCESS to ECSE Transition from ECSE to Kindergarten

34 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 34 The ECO Summary Form An ECO Summary form for each of 3 ECO areas must be reported for every infant/toddler with an IFSP or preschooler with an IEP. Data are needed in all ECO areas even if: No one has concerns about a childs development A child has delays in one or two ECO areas, but not in all three ECO areas

35 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 35 The ECO Summary Form Comparison to peers or standards: To what extent does this child show age-appropriate functioning in the area of [ECO Area] across a variety of settings and situations? Using a 7-Point Rating Scale

36 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 36 The ECO Summary Form Childs Ratings are a snapshot of The whole child Functioning Across settings and situations Rather than Skill by skill, In one standardized way, or Split by domains

37 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 37 The ECO Summary Form Progress: Has the child shown any new skills or behaviors related to [ECO Area] since the last IFSP/IEP meeting?

38 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 38 The ECO Summary Form Childs Progress is based on any of the following: Acquisition of a new skill or behavior since the last IFSP or IEP meeting Independent demonstration of a skill or behavior Progression made toward achieving IFSP Outcomes or IEP Goals Improvement of skills and behaviors to a level nearer to age-appropriate functioning

39 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 39 The ECO Summary Form Supporting Evidence for Outcome Rating and Progress in [ECO Area] Information gathered from various procedures and multiple sources of data RIOT Progress monitoring data IFSP and IEP Results data Age appropriate expectations

40 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 40 Using the Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form… Determining a Childs Rating and Progress

41 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 41 The Comparison to Peers or Standards (Questions 1a, 2a, 3a) Thinking about each ECO area… To what extent does this child show age- appropriate functioning in the area of [ECO Area] across a variety of settings and situations?

42 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 42 To Decide on a Childs Rating… Know what behaviors and skills are appropriate for the childs age How do children who are developing typically function on this ECO area? Review the multiple sources of information to determine how the child functions across a variety of situations and settings Understand the differences between the outcome rating scale from 1 to 7

43 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 43 Childs Ratings in the ECO Areas The IFSP or IEP Team determining the childs rating reach consensus on a number between 1 and 7. Descriptions are given for numbers 7 – Completely 5 – Somewhat 3 – Emerging 1 – Not Yet Check 2, 4, or 6 if the childs functioning is in between. That is, the child functions with more skill than the lower number, but not quite as described in the higher number.

44 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 44 7 – Completely means… Child shows functioning expected for his/her age in all or almost all of everyday situations that are part of a childs life home, store, park, child care, with strangers, etc. Functioning is considered appropriate for his/her age No concerns

45 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 45 6 – Between completely and somewhat means… Childs functioning is generally considered appropriate for his/her age Some concerns about the childs functioning

46 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 46 5 – Somewhat means… Functioning expected for his/her age some of the time and/or in some situations Mix of appropriate and not age- appropriate Might be more like a slightly younger child

47 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 47 3 – Emerging means… Child does not yet show functioning expected of a child of age in any situation Skills and behaviors include immediate foundational skills upon which to build age- appropriate functioning Saying one word is a foundational skill to putting two words together Playing beside one another before they interact in play Might be more like a younger child

48 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 48 1 – Not Yet means… Child does not yet show functioning expected of a child of his/her age in any situation Skills and behaviors do not yet include any immediate foundational skills upon which to build age-appropriate functioning Might be more like a much younger child

49 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 49 None Quite Fit? Use the in-between Outcome Ratings of 2, 4, and 6 for children who have some characteristics of two different descriptions

50 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 50

51 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 51 The Progress Question (1b, 2b, 3b) Progress based on childs own past performance Has the child shown ANY new skills or behaviors related to [ECO Area] since the last IFSP or IEP Meeting? Yes No Not Applicable because Initial IFSP/IEP Meeting Small steps of progress count! Most will check yes

52 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 52 Supporting Evidence for Outcome Rating and Progress (1c, 2c, 3c) On the ECO Summary form, IFSP and IEP Teams will need to document: What methods (RIOT) were used to determine childs rating and progress What were the specific sources of information E.g. Parent, ECSE Teacher, SLP, XYZ Assessment What were the relevant results that support the teams decisions Provides a record of the basis for the decisions

53 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 53 Supporting Evidence for Outcome Rating and Progress… (1c, 2c, 3c) Date of Assessment Method Used (Check all that apply) Sources of Information Summary of Relevant Result (include present level of performance) Record Review Interviews Observations Tests/Assessments Other

54 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 54 EXAMPLE: Supporting Evidence for Outcome Rating and Progress for Appropriate Behaviors to Meet their Needs Date of Assess ment Method Used (Check all that apply) Sources of Information Summary of Relevant Result (include present level of performance) 4/2/06 Record Review Physicians Medical Report Candaces AFOs have been modified to support an increase in range of motion 4/12/06 Interviews Childs Mother Candaces mother reports that she eats with her fingers and does not use a fork or spoon. 4/4, 8, 10/06 Observations Early Childhood Special Education Teacher --observed during arrival/departure, toileting and snack Candace used her fingers to feed herself and needs hand-over-hand assistance to use a spoon; Candace tugs on her diaper after it is wet or soiled; She puts one arm through the sleeve of her coat 4/14/06 Tests/Assessments Carolina Curriculum for Infants and Toddlers with Special Needs Self-help: Eating – 12 – 15 months Self-help: Dressing – 15 – 18 months Self-help: Grooming – months Self-help: Toileting – months

55 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 55 Practice with the Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form

56 Modified from presentation by the National Early Childhood Outcomes Center 56 The Take Home Messages Early Childhood Outcomes are not primarily about data ECO are about doing good things for children and families And using ECO data as a tool to help programs, providers and families know if what they are doing is making a difference for children and families…and if not, to make improvements so they will!


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