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Head Start and Public Schools Strengthening Birth to PK-3 Partnerships Approaches to Linking PK-3 in Massachusetts: Activities to Support Continuity for.

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Presentation on theme: "Head Start and Public Schools Strengthening Birth to PK-3 Partnerships Approaches to Linking PK-3 in Massachusetts: Activities to Support Continuity for."— Presentation transcript:

1 Head Start and Public Schools Strengthening Birth to PK-3 Partnerships Approaches to Linking PK-3 in Massachusetts: Activities to Support Continuity for Children and Families Across Early Learning and Elementary Grades Community Meetings June 2011 Including Data from the Office Of Head Start Summit, On the Road to School Readiness presented by Catherine Scott-Little on February 15-17, 2011 Baltimore, MD

2 Welcome Who is here today: Head Start-HS Program Directors, Education Supervisors, Child Outcomes Coordinator, Assistance Program Directors, Special Needs Coordinators, Social Service Coordinator, Disabilities Specialist, Director of Program Development and Operations, & MHSA Executive Director. Public Schools- PS Early Childhood Director, Kindergarten Transition Specialist, Assistant Program Director, PS Service Coordinator, Director of Unified Services, School Special Educator, and Principal of Early Education Center. Early Intervention-EI Department of Public Health Early Intervention Regional Specialist, E.I. Assistant Director, Childrens Community Development Specialist. Coordinated Family and Community Engagement CFCE Program Coordinator 2

3 Overview of Presentation Content: PK-3 Alignment Mission Statements Support Alignment What Science and Research Tell us Key PK-3 Principles and Elements Examples of current and future activities Other Initiatives -Birth to age 8 Infrastructure and Accountability Looking Ahead On the Road to School Readiness Aligning State Standards, the Head Start Child Development Early Learning Frameworks & Our Work with Children Head Start & Public Schools Memorandum of Agreement Guiding principles Purpose of MOU 10 Federally Mandated Activities State Current & Future Activities to Support MOU Implementation 3

4 4 Mission Statements to Support PK-3 Alignments

5 Mission Statements Support Alignment provide the foundation that supports all children in their development as lifelong learners and contributing members of the community, and supports families in their essential work as parents and caregivers. strengthen the Commonwealths public education system so that every student is prepared to succeed in postsecondary education, compete in the global economy, and understand the rights and responsibilities of American citizens, and in so doing, to close all proficiency gaps. Department of Early Education and Care Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 5 Head Start Improve Childrens school readiness outcomes and promote changes that integrate children into a continuum of high-quality early care and education spanning from birth to age eight. Boston Public Schools As the birthplace of public education in this nation, the Boston Public Schools is committed to transforming the lives of all children through exemplary teaching in a world-class system of innovative, welcoming schools. We partner with the community, families and students to develop within every learner the knowledge, skill, and character to excel in college, career, and life.

6 6 Our unified vision is... …Proficiency on Grade 3 Statewide Literacy and Mathematics Assessments

7 7 What Science and Research Tell Us About Child Development

8 What the Science Tells Us About Child Development The brains architecture is being built from the bottom up Early experiences literally shape the developing brainfor good or ill 8

9 How the Science Guides Policy Shonkoff, Jack P., MD: Leveraging an Integrated Science of Early Childhood Development to Strengthen the Foundations of Health, Learning, and Behavior. Harvard University Center on the Developing Child. Presentation to the EEC 2010 Early Childhood Information Systems Strategic Planning Institute - Cambridge, MA | November 18,

10 What We Know from Experience and Research Children enter school with vastly different skills. Research shows that gaps in learning exist by 18 months of age. High quality preschool supports children to develop age appropriate skills and be ready to succeed in kindergarten. Childrens overall healthy development is critical to learning. Social and emotional competencies as well as physical health are tied to academic success. The support and involvement of families in their childs education and development is necessary for successful learning. 10

11 National Center for Children in Poverty Access Related Data (2009) 11 There are 459,330 children in MA under age six, 29% live in low income

12 12 Children Experiencing Multiple Risks in MA

13 Policies to Consider and Discuss Universal Preschool Mandated, Universal Full-Day Kindergarten (Offering and Attendance) Class Size and/or Ratio Regulations in PK-3 Shift in access eligibility from family income to child need 13

14 14 PK-3 Alignments: Key Principles and Elements

15 Key Principles in the PK-3 Alignment 1.Horizontal alignment 2.Vertical alignment 3.Temporal alignment 15

16 Principle 1: Horizontal Alignment Horizontal alignment Vertical alignment Temporal alignment Horizontal alignment is created by using consistent learning approaches within an age range or grade. Full-day kindergarten 16

17 Principle 2: Vertical Alignment Horizontal alignment Vertical alignment Temporal alignment Vertical alignment is created by using consistent learning approaches across ages or grades. 1 st grade K Pre-K 2 nd grade 3 rd grade 17

18 Principle 3: Temporal Alignment Horizontal alignment Vertical alignment Temporal alignment Temporal alignment is created by using consistent learning approaches across a childs day. 18

19 19 What does Pk-3 look like in Massachusetts? A coordinated and collaborative approach

20 20 Cross Agency Collaboration on P-3 Instructional Tools and Practices Data and Assessment Instructional Environment (school and Classroom) Engaged Families Administrators & Leadership Quality Transitions and Pathways Teacher Quality & Capacity Mechanisms for Cross-Sector Alignment

21 Mechanisms for cross-sector alignment (Governance, strategic plans) Administrators and Leadership Quality (Leadership is inclusive/facilitative and focused on instruction) Teacher Quality and Capacity (Focus on credentials and professional development; professional dispositions; professional community) Instructional Tools and Practices (Curriculum content; alignment of standards and curricula; pedagogical methods) Instructional Environment (Student-centered learning culture (classroom and school)) Data and Assessments (Data and assessment used to improve instruction) Engaged Families (Families and communities engaged in student learning) Transitions and Pathways (Focus on childrens movement through the continuum) 1 Kauerz, Kristie (2011). Sustaining Your Work: PreK-3 rd Implementation and Evaluation Framework; a presentation to ESE PK-3 grantees. Harvard University: Cambridge, MA. PK-3 Elements 1

22 22 Examples of PK-3 Elements: Current & Future Activities

23 Mechanisms for Cross-Sector Alignment (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiative) Executive Office of Education Inter-agency Taskforce focused on PK-3 Literacy Support the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between EEC and Springfield PS to develop a PK-3 infrastructure Early Childhood State Advisory Council (SAC) Support collaborative efforts between early education and care providers and the public schools (e.g., joint professional development) Co-sponsor an Institute on Literacy and Mathematics, weaving the social-emotional and family engagement frameworks into the content

24 24 Administrators and Leadership Quality (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiatives) Support the CAYL Institute and Principal Leadership forums Create a survey course for Literacy PK-3 in collaboration with University of Massachusetts Boston Link the STEM work with the professional development priorities around literacy and mathematics in early education Support principals to develop early education and early elementary expertise

25 25 Teacher Quality and Capacity (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiative) EEC Licensing requirements and ESE Teacher certification requirements Administer the Early Literacy Grant and the Early Childhood Special Education Grants Create opportunities for collaborative team planning between general and special education Create common planning time for school staff across and between grade levels Coordinate across program types to support children with disabilities

26 26 Instructional Tools and Practices (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiative) Standards: Roll-out the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts and Literacy and the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics Curriculum: Align the Guidelines for Preschool Learning Experiences and Kindergarten Learning Experiences with the new frameworks Integrate content areas and create interdisciplinary curriculum Develop a birth to literacy curriculum for educators Instruction: Ensure developmentally appropriate practice in PK-3 classrooms Provide knowledge of child development to teachers, administrators and assistants Differentiate instruction Implement tiered systems of support Enrich learning experiences for children PK-3 Focus on the whole child Use play effectively to promote learning

27 27 Instructional Environments (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiative) Administer the PK-3 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Alignment Project Administer the Universal Preschool Grant Administer the Quality Full-Day Kindergarten Grant Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) Create small class sizes and appropriate adult: student ratios Alignment of schools and after-school and out-of-school time programs related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and professional development

28 28 Data and Assessments (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiative) Develop and use data systems to address PK-3 issues Implement comprehensive assessment approaches by using formative assessment, progress monitoring, and summative student data Replicate the Chicago Study focused on Literacy/Mathematics and social-emotional competencies Use Classroom Assessment Scoring System instrument in Head Start programs, as an option in QRIS and in some Quality Full-Day Kindergarten grant classrooms. Implement Quality Rating and Improvement System requirements for evidence-based formative assessments in early education and care programs (infant, toddler, and preschool) and after-school and out- of-school time programs

29 Engaged Families (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiative) Administer the Coordinated Family and Community Engagement Grants (EEC) Create opportunities for staff from EEC and ESE to jointly develop a family and community engagement framework Support the work of the Wraparound Services model and School Turnaround work, including engagement of families Conduct home visits and other non-traditional strategies (e.g., parent groups, resource rooms) Build partnerships among families, schools, and community-based organizations Access behavioral health services and other supports (e.g., mental health)

30 EEC Family and Community Engagement Networks 30 FY12 CFCE Grant Awards Total :107

31 31 Transitions and Pathways (Examples of current and future activities to support PK-3 initiative) Support student transitions within and across grades Create and use common transition forms between public and community-based preschool programs to share data with kindergarten teachers Provide opportunities for preschool children to visit kindergarten classrooms and kindergarten teachers to visit children in their preschool program Develop a common understanding about student expectations and share that understanding among birth to five providers and PK-3 staff

32 32 Other Related Statewide Initiatives

33 Birth to Eight Leadership Institute In partnership with ESE, EEC is sponsoring a Birth the 8 Leadership Fellowship Institute focused on three areas of importance: child growth and development; literacy, and dual language learners. Educators are eligible for the Fellowship if they are: An elementary school principal; or A director of a program such as Head Start, center-based and out-of-school time care programs, and FCC systems The Institute includes three in-depth meetings with national experts and state leaders on March 26, April 30, and June 4, Meetings target leaders throughout Massachusetts, with priority for principals of Level 4 Elementary Schools, and include proportionate numbers of representatives from Head Start, family child care, center-based care and other programs. Cities/towns represented by multiple participants: 33

34 SAC Goal 3 – B-8 Community Planning and PK-3 Partnerships Co-Investment Funding Partnership Contracts with the Philanthropic Sector Support for community birth through age 8 (B-8) strategic plans, anchored in local data on: Child/family needs, and The quality/effectiveness of PK through Grade 3 aligned systems linking local schools, local providers, and families through grants to communities. Development of tools and assessments which are aligned based on child development including standards, to be used locally between the early education and public schools SAC Goal 3 Related Updates: 1. ESE/ EEC PK – 3 Partnership 2. Head Start and the Public Schools 34

35 Proposal: Grants to Support Birth to 8 Community Planning in Rural Communities In response to feedback provided by the SAC suggesting that resources be targeted to rural communities, EEC proposes awarding grants to rural communities to support birth to 8 community planning. Grants relate to SAC Goal 3: Birth to 8 Community Planning and Pre-k to 3 rd partnerships. EEC plans to allocate $95,000 of the ARRA SAC the purpose of rural community planning grants. Grants will be approximately $5,000 each and will be focused on supporting the needs of children and families in rural communities through community planning. EEC has reviewed population per square foot and the number of children ages 0-5 in communities to determine which communities would be eligible to apply for funds (see following data). 35

36 Out-of-School Time Literacy Initiative Out-of-School Time (OST) Literacy and Learning Promotion Initiative Goal is to retain or increase students academic gains, particularly in the area of literacy, by reinforcing their school day and year learning through high-impact activities and effective curricula during the summer months and throughout the school year. Supports OST programs ability to implement high-impact learning activities through partnerships with public school districts for direct training, modeling of effective direct instructional practice and coaching/feedback for program staff). The United Way is partnering with BOSTnet, WestMOST, and Boston DELTAS to support Out of School Time programs in partnering with seven school districts (Boston, Lowell, Lawrence, Lynn, Holyoke, Springfield, Worcester) designated Commissioners Districts by ESE United Way Mass Bay is also collaborating with United Way of Central Massachusetts and United Way of Pioneer Valley to provide a statewide learning community for participants in the initiative. Evaluation results show that 85% of all participants avoided typical summer literacy loss; 68% showed gains in reading 36

37 Literacy Initiatives Grants to the USDOE Promise Neighborhoods to support Early literacy engagement with hard to reach families who currently are not connected to any community agency in their area Interactive training on assessment strategies for working with Second Language Learners through the Umass Donohue Initiative; participants receive an overview of the pre Language Assessment Scales (preLAS) oral language and pre-literacy assessment for four, five, and six year olds and strategies to use in the classroom and with families to support second language acquisition. The Parent-Child Home Program (PCHP) literacy trainings for family child care providers (ARRA funded) Introductory Presentations on the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework/PK-12 Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and Math through the Regional Readiness Centers Get Ready to Read! national initiative to build the early literacy skills of preschool-age children provides an easy-to-administer, research- based screening tool to early childhood educators, child care providers, and parents in order to help them prepare all children to learn to read and write Forum on literacy professional development and community engagement in partnership with Reach Out and Read 37

38 State Level Efforts on Early Childhood Assessment EEC and ESE rolling out a PK-3 framework that looks at the alignment of curriculum, instruction, and assessment from birth up through grade 3 as well as elements such as leadership, professional development, and family engagement. Critical to promoting and understanding young childrens development and learning and, ultimately, will lead to their success in school. Assessment of young children that is developmentally appropriate is an important element of this framework. Think about assessment within the context of the PK-3 framework, not just school readiness/kindergarten readiness. Look at childrens growth and progress in an ongoing way over time to understand where they are in their learning trajectories and how to best support them to optimize their development and learning. Assessment of children at a single point-in-time and in isolation of ongoing assessment practices doesnt provide us with the broader picture of a childs development and how to optimize their learning. An early childhood assessment system must be comprehensive and focus on the whole child; research on children and educational outcomes has documented the importance of childrens physical and social-emotional health on their availability and ability to learn. 38

39 State Level Efforts on Early Childhood Assessment MA has taken a slow-and-steady approach to the requirement to create a kindergarten readiness assessment system for a number of reasons. There are many different curricula and assessment practices being used and we want to make sure that we understand those practices in order to best inform what our system should look like. We want to be clear on the questions that a kindergarten readiness assessment system should answer so that we can ensure that we have the right tools to collect the necessary data. We want to make sure that we have properly trained the field on the importance of developmentally appropriate assessment, how to do it, and how to use the data to inform instruction and program improvements. We want to make sure that whatever we create for an early childhood assessment system aligns with infant-toddler growth and development as well as growth and development of children in the PK-Grade 3 system. 39

40 Assessment: Kindergarten Readiness Kindergarten Readiness Assessment Model Design and Pilot EEC has selected New York University (NYU) Child and Family Policy Center (CFPC) as the vendor for a the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment Model Design and Pilot Project. CFPC will design a model of formative and/or summative assessment that can be used in preschool and/or kindergarten in the mixed system of early education and care programs as well as public school programs to demonstrate childrens kindergarten readiness level. The model will serve the following purposes: Provide child-level data to educators which can be used to inform classroom practice and individualize instruction for children; Provide data that can be aggregated at the program level for site-based improvement and growth tracking; Provide sample or complete data sets that can be aggregated at the state level to make statements about the school readiness level of children in the Commonwealth and inform policymaker decision making. CFPC will also develop a training module for teachers, select pilot sites and work with educators to collect pre and post-test assessments of teachers perceptions of the feasibility, acceptability and educational benefit of the direct assessments being Piloted. 40

41 41 Infrastructure to Provide Access to High Quality Services

42 Infrastructure to Provide Access to High Quality Services: Current and future activities to support Pk-3 Administer the PK-3 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Alignment Project Support the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between EEC and Springfield PS to develop a PK-3 infrastructure Administer the Universal Preschool Grant and the Quality Full-Day Kindergarten Grant Create small class sizes and appropriate adult : student ratios Alignment of schools and after-school and out-of- school time programs related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and professional development State Assigned Student Identifier (SASID) exchange pilot between EEC and ESE EEC Professional Qualifications Registry open to license exempt public school programs Implementation of QRIS-PK as a partner with school districts by focusing on the five areas 42

43 Purposes of the Massachusetts QRIS Programs and providers use one streamlined set of standards that are connected to supports and fiscal incentives to help them meet and maintain the standards. Programs receive feedback and are involved in continuous quality improvement. Parents have easily accessible information about the quality of early care and education programs. Policymakers understand where and how to invest additional resources. High-quality early education and care and out of school opportunities are available throughout the Commonwealth that demonstrate improved outcomes for children. 43

44 Center-based/ School-Based Programs For use by center-based and school-based programs, including license-exempt center-based programs (i.e. public school preschools, Montessori schools, or faith- based affiliated programs serving infants, toddlers, preschool-age children). Family Child Care For use by Family Child Care homes Afterschool/Out of School Time Programs For use by After School and Out of School Time programs, serving school-age children and youth (kindergarten and up) outside of the hours of the regular school day. Programs may be located on public school premises. 44 There are QRIS Standards for Each QRIS Program Type

45 MA QRIS Standards are organized in 5 Categories with Subcategories 1.Curriculum and Learning: 1A. Curriculum, Assessment, and Diversity 1B. Teacher- Child Interactions 2.Safe, Healthy Indoor and outdoor Environments: 2A. Safe, Healthy Indoor and outdoor Environments 3.Workforce Qualifications and Professional Development: 3A. Program Administrators 3B. Program Staff/Educators 4.Family and Community Engagement 4A. Family and Community Engagement 5.Leadership, Management and Administration: 5A. Leadership, Management, and Administration 5B. Supervision 45

46 QRIS Measurement Tools: Environment Rating Scales ITERS-R is designed to assess center-based child care programs for infants and toddlers up to 30 months of age. Also available Spanish. Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale, Revised Edition ECERS-R is designed to assess group programs for children of preschool through kindergarten age, 2½ through 5. Expanded score sheet and additional notes improve accuracy in scoring. Also available Spanish. Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale, Revised Edition FCCERS-R is designed to assess family child care programs conducted in a provider's home for children from infancy through school-age. This resource is also available Spanish. Family Child Care Environment Rating Scale, Revised Edition SACERS is a scale designed to assess group- care programs for children of school age, 5 to 12. It contains full instructions for using the scale, a training guide, and notes clarifying selected items are also included. The School-Age Care Environment Rating Scale 46 edu

47 QRIS Measurement Tools (Cont.) PAS is a reliable and easy-to-administer tool designed to assess quality in ten areas: human resources development, personnel cost and allocation, center operations, child assessment, fiscal management, program planning and evaluation, family partnerships, marketing and public relations, technology, and staff qualifications. Program Administration Scale (Center- School based) BAS is a reliable tool for measuring the overall quality of business and professional practices in family child care settings. When used with FCCERS-R these instruments provide a comprehensive picture of the quality of the family child care learning environment and the business practices that support the program. Business Administration Scale Family Childcare APT is designed for programs serving children from kindergarten through middle school. It includes two tools. The APT Observation Tool (APT O) focuses on observable program practices; and the APT Program Questionnaire (APT Q), a self- assessment tool which examines other aspects of program quality,such as program planning and connections with schools and parents. The Assessing Afterschool Program Practices Tool 47 For More Info about APT: For More Info about PAS and BAS

48 QRIS Measurement Tools (Cont.) The 26-item Arnett-Caregiver Interaction Scale can be used without modification in both center and home-based settings. The items measure the emotional tone, discipline style, and responsiveness of the caregiver in the classroom. Available for Download from EECs Website Arnett -Caregiver Interaction Scale (Arnett-CIS) The CLASS is a tool for observing and assessing the qualities of interactions among teachers and children in classrooms. It measures the emotional, organizational, and instructional supports provided by teachers that are known from research to contribute to childrens social development and academic achievement. The Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) Strengthening Families Self-Assessment offers tools to help programs make small but significant changes in their day-to-day practice to build Protective Factors with families. Strengthening Families Program Self Assessment is should be used by all programs participating in QRIS at Level 2. Strengthening Families Self-Assessment 48 For More Info about CLASS For more Info about the Strengthening Families Self Assessment Tools:http://www.strengtheningfamilies.net/index.php/online_resources/g uide_assess/category/self_assessment/http://www.strengtheningfamilies.net/index.php/online_resources/g uide_assess/category/self_assessment/

49 49 Potential Partners to Build PK-3 Executive Office of Education Department of Higher Education and Institutions of Higher Education EEC (Policy, Professional Development, Early Childhood Information System) ESE (Title 1, Targeted Assistance, Special Education, Learning Support Services, Curriculum and Instruction, English Language Acquisition, Adult and Community Education) and the regional DSACs CAYL Institute Readiness Centers Davis Foundation United Way Resource and Referral Agencies Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership Strategies for Children Head Start Non-profit Community-based Organizations Independent Family Child Care Providers Massachusetts Administrators of Special Education Massachusetts Elementary Principals Association Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents Massachusetts Association of School Committees

50 Looking Ahead Building upon the learning between Head Start and Public Schools MOU experiences. Aligning Pre K to grade three in every district. SAC Needs Assessment Parent and Educator Surveys, Five Key Research Questions: 1.What is the demand for resources to support child development for families with children ages 0 to 13? 2.Which children and families have access to the programs that they need including high quality EEC programs, health care and community resources and supports? 3.Are children, birth to age 13, on track to succeed when they enter school and beyond? 4.How prepared is the EEC workforce to provide effective education and care for all? How stable is the workforce? What supports are available to educators to become more reflective practitioners? 5.How does the workforce define and understand quality in EEC programs? 50

51 Questions/Feedback? 51

52 Setting School Readiness Goals and Aligning State Standards, the Head Start CDEL Framework and Our Work with Children and Families Data from the Office Of Head Start Summit, On the Road to School Readiness presented by Catherine Scott-Little on February 15-17, 2011 Baltimore, MD

53 11

54 12 Reason 1: Head Start Act Requirement HEAD START ACT as amended 2007 (42USC9801 et. Seq) promotes use of/ alignment with ELS in: – Professional Development – Qualified staff – School readiness goals for children – Curriculum – Head Start Collaboration Directors responsibilities

55 13 Reason 2: Our children deserve it Common expectations from ELS/ELGs help make sure all children starting from the same place

56 14 Reason 3: Alignment of goals and curricula is the heart of smooth transitions

57 15

58 16 Alignment is The proper adjustment of the components of an electronic circuit, machine, etc., for coordinated functioning – Dictionary.com

59 1 8 Mis-alignment means potential for

60 1 9 Alignment means potential for

61 2 0 Theres more to alignment than meets the eye

62 2 1 Many alignment analyses are low complexity matrices One Document Another Document Aligned? Draws pictures with crayons Develops fine motor skills Plays with words, sounds, and rhymes Knows own name Identifies words that rhyme

63 In Head Start alignment means Coordinated functioning of – Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework – State Early Learning Standards/Early Learning Guidelines – Goals and objectives for individual children, for classrooms, and for the program – Curriculum used in teaching – Assessment used in gauging childrens learning & development – Communication with parents and families 17

64 Kagan, Scott-Little, Reid & Greenburg, Need to evaluate alignment on several parameters Balance: the degree to which the two documents address the same domains Depth: the degree to which the two documents address the same specific skills and knowledge within a domain Difficulty: the degree to which the expectations within the two documents reflect a similar level of difficulty or age-level

65 23

66 Balance Pre-K Standards Infant- toddler Standards Scott-Little, Kagan, Reid & Greenburg, % 20%8% 15 % 6 % 38 % 30 % 38 % Physical Development and Motor Skills Social and Emotional Development Approaches to Play and Learning Language and Communication Cognitive Development and General Knowledge

67 Scott-Little, Kagan, Reid & Greenburg, 2008 Difficulty: Infant/Toddler vs. Pre-Pre-Kindergarten vs.Kindergarten TotalPercentage of Standard Indicator Pairs Younger Age Group More Difficult than Older Age Group (-) Equal Difficulty (=) Older Age Group More Difficult than Younger Age Group 32 % 68 % (4 9) 65 % (7 5) (15 1) 22 % 3% (6) 10% (7) (1 6) * 96 Unpaired Indicators*184 Unpaired Indicators (+)

68 27

69 28 Balance Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework – Physical Development & Health - Social & Emotional Development - Approaches to Learning – Language Development – Literacy Knowledge & Skills – Mathematics Knowledge & Skills – Science Knowledge & Skills – Creative Arts Expression – Logic and Reasoning – Social Studies Knowledge & Skills – English Language Development State ELS may – Have a lower percentage of physical and health – Have lower percentage of social- emotional – Have higher percentage of cognitive development and general knowledge but omit logic and reasoning – Omit English Language Development

70 29 Depth: State ELS/ELGs may Physical development and health – Emphasize health knowledge and practice less Social-emotional Approaches to learning – Include some of the approaches to learning concepts in social- emotional Language and communication Cognitive development – Address additional areas of science and social studies

71 30 Difficulty State ELS/ELGs may have standards that are less difficult than the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework

72 31 Special considerations for use of standards with dual language children Continued use of home language is very important Teachers should plan activities and interactions that support their learning in all domain areas as well as their ability to learn English DLL children can demonstrate competency in any domain in either language Assessments should be culturally and linguistically appropriate and should use the language or languages that most accurately demonstrate the childs knowledge and abilities

73 32 Special considerations for children with disabilities Some additional alignment considerations – ISFP/IEP – OSEP Early Childhood Outcomes Should be working toward the same knowledge and skills described in the Head Start Framework and state ELS/ELGs May require more individualized/intense instruction, accommodations, and/or assistive technology Look for small and incremental progress

74 33 Take Away From Framework/ELS Alignment Considerations The Head Start Framework and state ELS/ELGs should be used together to set goals for children and to make decisions about curricula and assessments. There may be some examples of miss-alignment between the two documents. Special consideration should be given to how the Head Start Framework and ELS/ELGs are used with Dual Language Learners and children with disabilities.

75 36 A final thought Use of states ELS/ELGs can be an important tool to improve childrens transitions to public school – Working toward same goals a children in other programs – Support for cohesive system of school readiness goals, curriculum, and communication with parents

76 37 Resources Related to ELS/ELGs

77 Forging a Partnership We can only do this together! 77

78 Head Start and Public Schools Strengthening Birth-to-Grade 3 Partnerships Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)

79 Head Start and Public Schools Partnerships: Overview The 2007 Head Start reauthorization included many provisions requiring Head Start agencies, no later than Dec. 12, 2008, to enter into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with their local educational agencies (LEAs) to coordinate and to promote continuity of services and effective transition of children into the school system. Guiding Principles Create and maintain a meaningful partnership to promote school readiness so that children may receive comprehensive services to prepare them for elementary school and to address any potential achievement gap. Plan and implement strategies based on practice and research that have proven to support childrens school success Respect uniqueness of local Head Start & Public School needs and resources Promote involvement of members of the early care and education communities Share commitment, cooperation, and collaboration for a coordinated service delivery system Data from: Head Start Reauthorization Act of 2007 & OHS Model HSSCO MOU, 2009 & Note: In Massachusetts, the Board of EEC and participants of the fiscal and policy committee including representatives from the MHSA, DPH, HS programs, and HS parents are members of the SAC. 79

80 Purpose of the Memorandum of Agreement a. Improve availability and the quality of services for children and their families b. Support childrens optimal development & readiness for school entry and success c. Address the unique strengths and needs of the local population, such as homeless, migrant, or non-English speaking families d. Promote collaboration regarding shared use of transportation, facilities, etc. e. Reduce duplication and enhance efficiency of services f. Define responsibilities toward coordination and greater collaboration; enhance linkages and relationships; and exchange information on the provision of educational and non-educational services g. Coordinate a comprehensive system of activities, policies, and procedures that guide and support their delivery of services to children and their families Data from: OHS Model HSSCO MOU, 2009

81 Federally Mandated Activities: Joint Roles in System Review, Coordination, Collaboration, Alignment, and Implementation of MOU 1. Educational activities, curricular objectives, assessment, & instruction Implement a research-based early childhood curriculum that is aligned with the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework and State early learning standards 2. Public information dissemination & access to programs for families contacting HS or any of the preschool programs Generate support & leverage resources of the entire local community in order to improve school readiness & establish ongoing channels of communication that facilitate coordination of programs 3. Selection priorities for eligible children to be served by programs Develop and implement a system to increase program participation of underserved populations of eligible children, Develop procedures for identifying children who are limited English proficient, and informing the parents about the instructional services, coordinate and collaborate with other public or private entities providing early childhood education and development programs and services including, but not limited, to Part B of title one programs of Elementary and Secondary, programs under Section 619 and Part C of the Individual with Disability Act, state-pre K programs, etc. Activities highlighted in blue –discussion small group Data from: OHS Model HSSCO MOU, 2009

82 Federally Mandated Activities: Joint Roles in System Review, Coordination, Collaboration, Alignment, and Implementation of MOU 4. Definition of service areas Define areas where Public Schools and Head Start provide services to children 5. Opportunities for joint staff training on topics such as academic content standards, instructional methods, curricula, and social and emotional development Organize and participate in joint training, including transition-related training for school staff and Head Start staff 6. Program technical assistance Link services provided in Head Start with educational services, including services relating to language, literacy, and numeracy, provided by such local educational agency 7. Provision of services to meet the needs of working parents Coordinate activities to make resources available for full working-day and full calendar year available to children & collaborate with programs under the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 1990 Data from: OHS Model HSSCO MOU, 2009

83 Federally Mandated Activities: Joint Roles in System Review, Coordination, Collaboration, Alignment, and Implementation of MOU 8. Communication & parent outreach for smooth transitions to kindergarten Develop & implement a systematic procedure for transferring, with parental consent, Head Start program records for each participating child to the school in which such child will enroll, Establish comprehensive transition policies and procedures that support children transitioning to school including children with disabilities Conduct outreach to parents and elementary school teachers to discuss the educational, developmental, and other needs of individual children, Help parents of limited English proficient children understand instructional & other services available, Help parents (including grandparents and kinship caregivers, as appropriate) to understand the importance of parental involvement in a child's academic success 9. Provision and use of facilities, transportation, and other program elements Collaborate on the shared use of transportation and facilities 10. Other elements of activities mutually agreed to by the Head Start and Public Schools Data from: OHS Model HSSCO MOU, 2009

84 84 Three New Domains: Social studies, Logic and Reasoning, Language Development

85 Head Start and Public School Partnerships: Activities to support MOU Implementation Activities: In 2009, EEC and ESE distributed a joint Memorandum, to superintendents and charter school leaders, to work with their local Head Start program and ensure the development and implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). This memorandum required the MOU to be in place by June 30, A total of 143 MOUs were signed between HS and PS. In 2010, the HSSCO conducted a needs assessment annual update, as required by the Head Start Act of 2007, to report on collaboration, coordination and alignment of services and programs curricula and assessments with the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework and the States early learning standards. A new category was added to further understand PreK-3 Framework-collaboration between HS and LEAs which included standards, curriculum, and assessment alignment, joint professional development, information sharing in transition, parent involvement, and serving children with disabilities. The survey found that much work remains to be done to implement a robust PreK-3 framework in the Commonwealth. Data: Provided by OHS Region 1 total number of signed MOU in PIR Data: Reported that in 2010, there were a total of 191 agreements. 85

86 Head Start and Public School Partnerships: Current and Future Activities to support MOU Implementation Activities: The FY12 Head Start State Supplemental Renewal Grant required HS programs to provide a detailed plan and time line that addresses the activities program will undertake in FY'12 in order to comply with the school readiness requirements of the federally mandated Memorandum of Understanding between Head Start programs and Local Education Agencies (LEAs) A series of meetings between public preschool and Head Start representatives with a focus on full implementation of the activities of the federally required Head Start –LEA Memorandum of Understanding are scheduled to discus effective strategies to support childrens school readiness, shared best practices, and discuss alignment of the Head Start frameworks, preschool learning guidelines, and the Common Core EEC in Partnership with the HS T/TA System will be conducting a meeting discussion of alignment of the Head Start frameworks, preschool learning guidelines, and the Common Core standards. 86

87 Resources Related to Head Start & Needs Assessment Head Start Act Management/Head%20Start%20Requirements/Head%20Start%20Act Head Start Act Management/Head%20Start%20Requirements/Head%20Start%20Act Department of Elementary and Secondary –Head Start and LEAs Memorandum of Understanding Department of Early Education and Care HSSCO Need Assessment - Head Start and Transitions anagement/Head%20Start%20Requirements/Head%20Start%20Act/headstartact.html

88 Questions/Feedback? 88

89 Head Start & Public School Partnerships Group Discussions 89

90 Group Discussions 90 3 Topics for Discussion: 1) Alignment of Curriculum and Assessment 2) Opportunities for Joint Professional Development 3)Supporting Seamless Transitions Questions to Discuss: What is working well, in particular related to the following sections of the MOU that you would recommend as best practice for others across the state (Include in the discussion services to children with disabilities?) What could be working better? What support from each other, EEC or ESE is needed to improve outcomes? What type of technical assistance do you need to support your work? Are there collaborations outside of those required by the MOU that you would like to highlight as examples of best practice? Group Summary: Ideas/key lessons learned to share with the larger group.

91 Group Discussions 91 Topics for Discussion-Activities: 1) Alignment of Curriculum and Assessment Implement a research-based early childhood curriculum that is aligned with the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework and State early learning standards 2) Opportunities for Joint Professional Development Academic content standards, instructional methods, curricula, & social and emotional development, Organize and participate in joint training, including transition- related training for school staff and Head Start staff 3)Supporting Seamless Transitions Establish comprehensive transition policies and procedures that support children transitioning to school including children with disabilities Conduct outreach to parents and elementary school teachers to discuss the educational, developmental, and other needs of individual children, Help parents of limited English proficient children understand instructional & other services available, Help parents (including grandparents and kinship caregivers, as appropriate) to understand the importance of parental involvement in a child's academic success Develop & implement a systematic procedure for transferring, with parental consent, Head Start program records for each participating child to the school in which such child will enroll, et c.

92 Head Start & Public School Partnerships Group Report Feedback 92

93 Wrap Up/Next Steps Share lessons learned from group discussions with other Head Start and non-Head Start programs state-wide 93


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