Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Oh Deer! Do We Have a Problem?

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Oh Deer! Do We Have a Problem?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Oh Deer! Do We Have a Problem?
Vocabulary Review Game 10/13/2009 created by ranglin fo OH Deer PBL

2 Directions 4 science vocabulary terms will be shown at the top of the screen. One-at-a-time, 4 clues about one of the terms will be shown on the screen. You are to determine the term that all the clues refer to. If you select a correct answer, your team will earn points  The sooner you determine the correct answer, the more points your team will earn.  If you select an incorrect answer, it will cost your team points  Once an answer is submitted, it may not be changed.  Some terms may have similar meanings, so be careful not to answer too soon. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

3 Shhhhh Discussions about the answers should be done quietly between team members; you don’t want the other groups to earn points because they overheard your great ideas. Come to consensus (agreement) as a team before you submit an answer. Answers may not be changed once submitted. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

4 How to Earn Points Points Earned Number of clues presented if correct
if incorrect 4 - 4 3 - 3 2 -2 1 -1 If no answer is submitted after all clues are given - 5 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

5 competition predation parasitism symbiosis a tropic relationship
this system is potentially unstable- if Y extinguishes Z, then Y will starve. example- deer and wolves a mode of life in which food is primarily obtained by killing and consuming animals 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

6 C. predation a tropic relationship
this system is potentially unstable- if Y extinguishes Z, then Y will starve. example- deer and wolves a mode of life in which food is primarily obtained by killing and consuming animals 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

7 niche biome ecosystem habitat must supply the needs of organisms
an ecological or environmental area that is inhabited by a particular animal and plant species an organism's address a place where an organisms lives 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

8 D. habitat must supply the needs of organisms
an ecological or environmental area that is inhabited by a particular animal and plant species an organism's address a place where an organisms lives 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

9 competition commensalism parasitism symbiosis living together
a relationship in which 2 different species live in close association at least one member of a pair of organisms benefits from the relationship this term includes the other three 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

10 D. symbiosis living together
a relationship in which 2 different species live in close association at least one member of a pair of organisms benefits from the relationship this term includes the other three 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

11 A.C.T. G.P.S. G.I.S. U.P.S. communication between Earth based units and orbiting satellites space-based global navigation satellite system used for “geocaching” Global Positioning System 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

12 C. G.P.S. communication between Earth based units and orbiting satellites space-based global navigation satellite system used for “geocaching” Global Positioning System 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

13 whenever two niches overlap the outcome of shared or limited resources
competition commensalism parasitism symbiosis whenever two niches overlap the outcome of shared or limited resources example- blue jays and squirrels an interaction among living things where two populations vie for the same resources and territory 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

14 A. competition whenever two niches overlap
the outcome of shared or limited resources example- blue jays and squirrels an interaction among living things where two populations vie for the same resources and territory 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

15 carrying capacity commensalism equilibrium trophic level
when X > Y, X will decrease, when X < Y, X can survive forever, when X=Y, X can be maintained indefinitely the number of organisms being born equals the number of organisms dying population size of the species that the environment can sustain indefinitely the largest density an ecosystem can support for a particular population 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

16 A. carrying capacity when X > Y, X will decrease, when X < Y, X can survive forever, when X=Y, X can be maintained indefinitely the number of organisms being born equals the number of organisms dying population size of the species that the environment can sustain indefinitely the largest density an ecosystem can support for a particular population 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

17 mutualism commensalism parasitism ecologism
individuals of this relationship experience higher success rates than those that do not positive reciprocal relationship between two species example- legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria a symbiotic relationship in which both organisms benefit 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

18 A. mutualism individuals of this relationship experience higher success rates than those that do not positive reciprocal relationship between two species examples- legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria a symbiotic relationship in which both organisms benefit 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

19 biogeochemical cycles equilibrium
Hardy Weinberg Theory succession biogeochemical cycles equilibrium predictable and orderly changes in the composition or structure of an ecological community initiated either by formation of new, unoccupied habitat or by a disturbance of an existing community the process of ecological changes in a community the observed process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

20 C. succession predictable and orderly changes in the composition or structure of an ecological community initiated either by formation of new, unoccupied habitat or by a disturbance of an existing community the process of ecological changes in a community the observed process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

21 mutualism commensalism parasitism symbiolism a symbiotic relationship
a relationship between Y & Z, where Y benefits and Z is unaffected. example- clown fish living among the forest of tentacles of an anemone one organism benefits but the other is not affected. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

22 C. commensalism a symbiotic relationship
a relationship between Y & Z, where Y benefits and Z is unaffected. example- clown fish living among the forest of tentacles of an anemone one organism benefits but the other is not affected. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

23 biogeochemical cycles biotic factors
trophic levels abiotic factors biogeochemical cycles biotic factors lichens, algae, worms and insects plankton, viruses and bacteria animals, plants, trees and any materials they directly produce such as waste or falling leaves all organisms in an ecological setting 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

24 D. biotic factors lichens, algae, worms and insects
plankton, viruses and bacteria animals, plants, trees and any materials they directly produce such as waste or falling leaves all organisms in an ecological setting 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

25 mutualism commensalism parasitism symbiolism a symbiotic relationship
Y spends a significant portion of its life in or on the living tissue of Z; Y may cause harm to Z without immediately killing Z example- dog and tick one organism feeds off of another organism 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

26 B. parasitism a symbiotic relationship
Y spends a significant portion of its life in or on the living tissue of Z; Y may cause harm to Z without immediately killing Z example- dog and tick one organism feeds off of another organism 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

27 food chain energy pyramid food web biotic indicator
a graphical representation of the trophic levels shows how incoming solar energy is transferred in an ecosystem a diagram that compares the amount of energy available to populations at different levels of the food chain producers are at the bottom, predators are at the top 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

28 C. energy pyramid a graphical representation of the trophic levels
shows how incoming solar energy is transferred in an ecosystem a diagram that compares the amount of energy available to populations at different levels of the food chain producers are at the bottom, predators are at the top 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

29 biogeochemical cycles abiotic and biotic factors
trophic levels succession biogeochemical cycles abiotic and biotic factors a pathway by which a chemical elements or molecules moves through compartments of Earth chemical interactions that exist between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere naturally occurring physical, chemical and biological processes carbon cycle; nitrogen cycle; oxygen cycle, water cycle 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

30 B. biogeochemical cycles
a pathway by which a chemical elements or molecules moves through compartments of Earth chemical interactions that exist between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere naturally occurring physical, chemical and biological processes carbon cycle; nitrogen cycle; oxygen cycle, water cycle, etc… 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

31 G.P.S. U.P.S. G.I.S. A.C.T. cartography and demographic database
stores, analyzes, and manages, and presents spatial information displays graphic information Geographic Information System 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

32 B. G.I.S. cartography and demographic database
stores, analyzes, and manages, and presents spatial information displays graphic information Geographic Information System 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

33 biogeochemical cycles biotic factors
index abiotic factors biogeochemical cycles biotic factors rocks and minerals temperature and weather light and atmospheric gases nonliving components of the biosphere 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

34 C. abiotic factors rocks and minerals temperature and weather
light and atmospheric gases nonliving components of the biosphere 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

35 species community population biotic factor
all of the black bears in West Virginia all of the white tail deer living in Harrison County a group of organisms of the same species residing in a defined space at a certain time the collection of organisms of a particular species living in a given geographic area. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

36 B. population all of the black bears in West Virginia
all of the white tail deer living in Harrison County a group of organisms of the same species residing in a defined space at a certain time the collection of organisms of a particular species living in a given geographic area. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

37 species community population biotic factors
all the plants and animals in the park a group of interacting organisms sharing an environment a group of interdependent organisms inhabiting the same region and interacting with each other an ecological unit composed of a group of organisms of different species occupying a particular area, usually interacting with each other and their environment. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

38 C. community all the plants and animals in the park
a group of interacting organisms sharing an environment a group of interdependent organisms inhabiting the same region and interacting with each other an ecological unit composed of a group of organisms of different species occupying a particular area, usually interacting with each other and their environment. 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

39 biogeochemical factors biotic factors
limiting factors abiotic factors biogeochemical factors biotic factors food and water supply resources that control a process, such as organism growth or species population, size, or distribution affect the rate of a metabolic reaction limit the growth or activities of an organism or that restricts the size of a population or its geographical range 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

40 A. limiting factors food and water supply
resources that control a process, such as organism growth or species population, size, or distribution affect the rate of a metabolic reaction limit the growth or activities of an organism or restrict the size of a population or its geographical range 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

41 niche biome ecosystem habitat
the function or position of an organism or population within an ecological community a particular area within a habitat occupied by an organism example- Hedgehogs rummage about in the flowerbeds eating a variety of insects and other invertebrates which live underneath the dead leaves and twigs where an organism lives and also what it does 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

42 A. niche the function or position of an organism or population within an ecological community a particular area within a habitat occupied by an organism example- Hedgehogs rummage about in the flowerbeds eating a variety of insects and other invertebrates which live underneath the dead leaves and twigs where an organism lives and also what it does 10/13/2009 created by ranglin

43 Clip art for the documents in this PBL are from Art Explosion 250,000 Images, CD-ROM. California: Nova Development Corporation, 10/13/2009 created by ranglin


Download ppt "Oh Deer! Do We Have a Problem?"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google