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Summer Food Service Program Administrative Sponsor Training 2012

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1 Summer Food Service Program Administrative Sponsor Training 2012
Food That’s In When School is Out! Welcome to the 2013 Summer Food Service Program Training. This training is required by all new and returning SFSP sponsors annually. Children need healthy food all year long. During the school year, many children receive free and reduced-price breakfast and lunch through the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. When school lets out many of these children are at risk of hunger. Hunger is one of the most severe roadblocks to the learning process. Lack of nutrition during the summer months may set up a cycle for poor performance once school begins again and make children more prone to illness and other health issues. The SFSP is designed to fill that nutrition gap and make sure children get the nutritious meals they need. Summer Food Service Program Administrative Sponsor Training 2012 Veronica Lietz, Acting Program Specialist Child Nutrition Programs

2 USDA-Summer Food Service Program
Federally-funded program administered through State agencies Provides free, nutritious meals to low-income children 18 years old and younger when school is not in session Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, PL simplified program administration in an effort to ensure that families of eligible children are aware of the availability of SFSP meals. The Summer Food Service Program is a federally-funded program administered by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) at the national level. Within each State, the program is administered by the State Department of Education. The SFSP was established to ensure that low-income children continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session. Free meals, that meet Federal nutrition guidelines, are provided to all children at approved SFSP sites in areas with significant concentrations of low-income children. USDA and State agencies are engaged in a continued effort to increase participation in the SFSP. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, PL simplified the administrative requirements of the SFSP in an effort to increase program participation and make families of eligible children aware of the availability of SFSP meals.

3 Simplified Summer Food Program
Receive the maximum “meals times rates” reimbursement for each eligible meal served to each eligible child. Costs do not have to be reported, but records must be maintained for State agency reviews Budget must be submitted to ensure quality of meals are maintained Sponsors must maintain a nonprofit food service status Under the simplified procedures, SFSP sponsors receive the maximum “meals times rates” reimbursement for operating and administrative costs. Costs do not have to be reported to the State Agency in order to receive reimbursement, but records of expenditures must be maintained for State Agency reviews in order to determine allowable costs and to ensure that a nonprofit food service is being operated. All sponsors must complete an annual budget, except for experienced school sponsors. The budget is part of the application process online and it must capture all estimated administrative and operating expenses for the program year. Program payments are not based on the budget, it just shows the State agency how you plan to spend your reimbursement. If you spend all your reimbursement on food and labor, those are the only things that you may need to include in your budget.

4 How Does the SFSP Work? State Agencies Sponsors Sites Recruit sponsors
Provide training and technical assistance Process claims for reimbursement Sponsors Recruit Sites Train & Monitor sites Submit claims for reimbursement Outreach to children There are three main entities involved in the SFSP: State agencies, sponsors, and sites. State agencies administer the program and act as a liason between USDA and SFSP Sponsors. Sponsors run the program and communicate with the State agency. Schools, local government agencies, camps, faith-based and other non-profit community organizations that have the ability to manage a food service program may be SFSP sponsors. Sites: places in the community where children receive meals in a safe and supervised environment. Sites may be located in a variety of settings, including schools, parks, community centers, churches, and migrant centers. Sites work directly with sponsors. Sites Feed and supervise kids Provide activities Outreach to children

5 Participant Eligibility
Children age 18 and under may receive meals through SFSP; or a person who has a mental or physical disability as determined by a State or local educational agency and who participates during the school year in an educational program. Children 18 and under may receive meals through SFSP as well as a mental or physically disabled person as recognized by the State or local educational agency. Documentation of a person’s mental or physical disability includes a certification from the State disability services or local educational agency recognizing the specific disability of the person. Documentation must be kept on file. In some circumstances, pregnant women who receive Early Head Start services also qualify. However, prospective mothers must be enrolled in Early Head Start and be eligible to receive meals through NSLP or CACFP. 7CFR225.2

6 Sponsor Eligibility Public or private non-profit organization including: Schools Residential camps Colleges or universities with NYSP Units of local, county, municipal, State or Federal government Other nonprofit organizations Must be able to provide documentation of tax exempt status (churches are exempt from this requirement) Every potential or currently participating sponsor must meet certain requirements. Sponsors eligible to participate in the Summer Food Service Program must be: A public or private nonprofit school food authority A public or private nonprofit residential camp A public or private nonprofit college or university participating in the National Youth Sports Program A unit of local, county, municipal, state or federal government or, Any other type of private nonprofit organization All sponsors must be able to provide documentation of their tax exempt status. Although churches must be tax-exempt there is no federal requirement that they provide documentation of their tax-exempt status.

7 Sponsor Responsibilities
Sponsors must: Demonstrate financial and administrative capability Serve low-income children Conduct a nonprofit food service Provide year-round services in the community served Exercise management control over sites Conduct all monitoring requirements and train staff annually Maintain records to justify meal counts, income, expenses, etc. Meet meal pattern requirements File claims for reimbursement within allowed time frame Potential and returning sponsors must be able to demonstrate that they have the necessary financial and administrative capability to comply with Program requirements. Sponsors must accept final financial and administrative responsibility for all sites. The SFSP is a reimbursement program, and Sponsors should be able to cover costs up front. Advance payments are available, but they should not be used to solely support program operations. Sponsors must agree to provide regularly scheduled meal services to children in designated low-income areas, or agree to serve low-income children. *camps do not need to meet this criteria.* Sponsors must operate a nonprofit food service. A sponsor is operating a nonprofit food service if the food service operations conducted by the institution are principally for the benefit of participating children, and all program reimbursement funds are used solely for the operation or improvement of the food service. Sponsors must provide a year-round public service in the area in which they intend to provide SFSP services. Sponsors of camps and migrant sites do not need to meet this criteria. New and returning sponsors must demonstrate that they are able to manage the meal service at all of their sites. Management control of the meal service means that the sponsor is responsible for maintaining contact with the meal service staff, ensuring that there is adequately trained meal service staff on site, and monitoring site operations throughout the period of the program participation. Sponsors are responsible for maintaining all program records to justify meal counts, income, and expenses. The SFSP meal pattern must be followed at all sites, and claims must be filed by the 60-day deadline (State Agency prefers claims to be filed by the 30-day deadline) in order to receive reimbursement for meals served at all eligible sites.

8 Site Eligibility Types of Sites
Able to receive reimbursement for up to 2 meals a day Open Sites Restricted Open Sites Enrolled Sites Able to receive reimbursement for up to 3 meals a day Camps Alaska Native Migrant Site *Sponsors must provide documentation showing site eligibility criteria* Sponsors may operate the SFSP at one more or sites, which are the actual locations where meals are served to children. Eligible sites are those that serve children in low-income areas or those that serve specific groups of low-income children. Sponsors must provide documentation that proposed sites meet the income eligibility criteria required by law. There are several types of sites. The sites that are able to receive reimbursement for up to 2 meals or snacks a day include: open sites, restricted open sites, and enrolled sites. The sites that are able to receive reimbursement for up to 3 meals or snacks a day include: camps, Alaska Native and Migrant sites.

9 CENSUS BLOCK GROUP DATA
Open Sites Serve children in a needy area where at least 50% or more of the children residing in the area are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals Serve children on a first-come first-serve basis ELIGIBILITY DOCUMENTATION Open sites serve children in a needy area where at least 50% or more of the children residing in the area are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals. This type of site is the most common and desirable because it is the easiest to qualify. In an open site meals are served on a first-come first-serve basis, and all eligible meals served are reimbursable. Open sites must be publicized in the community served. In order to determine area eligibility for an open site, sponsors can either use school data provided by the State Agency or Census Block Group Data. We will discuss eligibility documentation shortly. For schools only: if you have an accredited summer school operating with the SFSP, you must operate as an open site in order to serve all children residing in the area. However, you may serve them at a different times. SCHOOL DATA CENSUS BLOCK GROUP DATA Special Note: School sponsors who operate summer school programs are required to be “OPEN” and provide meal to children enrolled in the summer school as well as those children living in the area

10 CENSUS BLOCK GROUP DATA
Restricted Open Site Initially open to broad community participation, but restricts attendance for reasons of security, safety, or control due to staff or space limitations Must be located in a needy area where 50% or more of the children residing in the area are eligible for free or reduced-price meals Restricted open sites are sites that operate as an open site that are initially open to broad community participation, but restrict or limit attendance for reasons of space, security, safety or control due to staff or space limitations. Restricted open sites must make known publicly that the site is open on a first-come, first-serve basis to all children of the community at large, but meal service will be limited for reasons previously stated. Like the open site, it must be located in a school attendance area where 50 percent or more of the children residing in the area are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals. Census Block Group data may also be used to establish area eligibility (more on this later). Restricted open sites are reimbursed for all eligible meals served to all eligible children. ELIGIBILITY DOCUMENTATION SCHOOL DATA CENSUS BLOCK GROUP DATA

11 Eligibility Documentation for Open/Restricted Open Sites
School Data Based on % of children in the school attendance area within which the site is located that are certified eligible for free or reduced-price school meals May use data from elementary, middle or high school Alaska Free and Reduced Data found on NSLP webpage: Data valid for 5 years School Data is the best way to qualify as an open site. It is based on the percentage of children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals and the total enrollment in the school attendance area within which the site is located. This should not be confused with the school meal participation rate. To qualify sites, sponsors may use data from elementary, middle, or high schools as long as the site is located in the attendance area of the school. Our State agency has Free and Reduced Data for October for each school listed by the school district. Data is reestablished annually and is posted on the NSLP website. There is also a copy in your packets. This data is good for 5 years. However, it is always best to reestablish the site eligibility every year, just in case the qualifying school falls below 50%. For example, in 2011, you’ve established site eligibility for a site using school data, that data is valid until If you reestablish site eligibility using the most current school data, the 5 years starts over. As part of the application process, sponsors must submit the following information to the State Agency to substantiate eligibility for each site they intend to serve: the names of the schools used to establish eligibility, the number (NOT NAMES) of all children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals, total number of children enrolled in those schools, and area eligibility map from the school district indicating that the site is within that schools attendance area (most school districts have area eligibility maps available on their websites). Just a note: Charter schools and alternative schools generally do not qualify as eligible schools for qualifying area eligibility as it pulls children from all over and not just within the school attendance area. *Charter Schools and Alternative Schools generally do not qualify as eligible schools for documenting area eligibility as it pulls children from all over and not just within the school attendance area*

12 Eligibility Documentation for Open/Restricted Open Sites
Census Data Census Block Group data identifies areas of “pockets of poverty” 50 % or more of the children residing in the Census Block Group must be eligible for free or reduced-price school meals American Community Survey (ACS) provides annual estimates, most current data must be used Data valid for 5 years There are some circumstances where we can use census data to establish area eligibility for SFSP sites. Census Block Groups are composed of about 400 households in any given region, and identify areas of “pockets of poverty.” The ACS data now identifies SFSP criteria by specifying the total number of children 18 years or younger in the census block group that fall below 185 percent of the federal poverty guidelines. Under the ACS, new five-year estimates are provided annually. The most current census data must be used to establish area eligibility, and it is valid for 5 years. Again, it is always best to reestablish site eligibility every year, just in case the qualifying census block group falls below 50%. For example, in 2011, you’ve established site eligibility for a site using census data, that data is valid until If you reestablish site eligibility using the most current census data, the 5 years starts over. To use census data, sponsors will need to input the address of the site to determine the site eligibility in the census track data. Our State agency can help provide site eligibility using census data. Please contact our State agency if you wish to use Census data.

13 Enrolled Sites Serves an identified group of needy children
50% of enrolled children must be eligible for free or reduced-price school meals ELIGIBILITY DOCUMENTATION Enrolled sites serve an identified group of needy children that live in a “pocket of poverty” opposed to the community at large. Closed enrolled sites must also establish eligibility, either through individual income eligibility of the children attending the site, or through area eligibility. To establish eligibility based on the income of individual children, sites must collect income eligibility forms and determine that at least 50% of the enrolled children are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals. These sites can be used if you do not wish to open up the site to broad community participation, or if your community does not qualify for the SFSP based off of school data or census data. Schools with accredited summer school programs may not use this option. There are several ways you can qualify as an enrolled site: Use school data or census data to qualify based off of area eligibility Determine eligibility of the site by gathering free/reduced price school meals information for each child enrolled from the schools the children are enrolled in. At least 50% of the children enrolled must qualify for free or reduced-price school meals (if interested in this method please contact the SA), or Collect individual income eligibility forms for all attending children. Again, at least 50% of the children enrolled must qualify for free or reduced-price school meals SCHOOL DATA OR CENSUS BLOCK GROUP DATA INDIVIDUAL INCOME ELIGIBILITY FORMS FREE/REDUCED PRICE SCHOOL MEALS ELIGIBILITY STATUS

14 Eligibility Documentation for Enrolled Sites
Area Eligibility School data Census data School District Documentation Collect free/reduced price eligibility status of children from school district(s) they attend Obtain eligibility on District letterhead or a copy of actual income eligibility form Income Eligibility Forms Collect individual Income Eligibility Forms Use correct household size – income scale when approving The easiest way to document enrolled sites is using area eligibility information either through school data or census data. If a closed enrolled site is documenting its eligibility by using school data or census data, the site must serving children that reside within the location of that site. Another option would be to contact the school district(s) and collect the free/reduced price eligibility status of each child enrolled. Sponsors must obtain the eligibility status of each child by obtaining the eligibility status on School District letterhead or by receiving a copy of the actual income eligibility form (also known as household income application). Some schools will be apprehensive about providing this information. If you run into any problems obtaining this information, please contact the SA so they can facilitate the process. However if the site does not qualify by area, you may collect individual Income Eligibility forms to determine free or reduced-price eligibility status for each child enrolled using the Income Eligibility Guidelines (located in your packets). The sponsor must keep these forms on file and certify that at least 50% or more of the children enrolled are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals. The State Agency will carefully monitor participation in order to ensure that 50% of the enrolled children are in fact eligible for free or reduced-price school meals.

15 Camps May be residential or nonresidential
Residential camps must offer regularly scheduled food service as part of an organized program Nonresidential camps must offer cultural or recreational program between meal services. Reimbursed only for children eligible for free and/or reduced price school meals Camps can be residential or nonresidential day camps which offer regularly scheduled food services as part of an organized program for enrolled children. In residential camps, participants spend the duration of the organized program in a 24-hour supervised care setting and receive regularly scheduled meals as part of the camp program. Nonresidential camps must offer a continuous schedule of organized cultural or recreational programs for enrolled children between meal services. Unlike the other site types, camps can only be reimbursed for children eligible for free or reduced-price school meals (camps do not have to establish eligibility at the 50% level). Therefore they must collect individual Income Eligibility Forms or obtain free/reduced price school meals eligibility status from the schools that the enrolled camp participants attend. Camps cannot establish eligibility by area. Eligibility information MUST be established annually, or if multiple camp sessions are available eligibility information must be established at the beginning of each camp session. ELIGIBILITY DOCUMENTATION INCOME ELIGIBILITY FORMS FREE/REDUCED PRICE SCHOOL MEALS ELIGIBILITY STATUS

16 Income Eligibility Forms
Categorically Eligible Children are categorically eligible for free meals if the: Household receives Food Stamps, TANF, and FDPIR (does not include Denali Kid Care, SSI payments, or Medicaid) Child is a foster child (only foster child qualifies, not the entire household) Income Applications Must be completed to its entirety (adult signature, last 4 digits of SSN, 10 digit case number for Food Stamps, etc.) Must include how eligibility was determined (eligible/ineligible), date and initial/signature of determining official Sponsors will need to collect individual Income Eligibility Forms for Enrolled Sites, Camps or Upward Bound Programs. Sponsors will need to distribute these forms to the families. Once you receive the forms back, sponsors will need to: Check for completeness Use the Income Eligibility Guidelines to determine whether the child qualifies for a free or reduced price meal. If they qualify for either of those meals, they are eligible for reimbursement. If a family is over income or makes more than the guidelines for free and reduced price meals, the meals do not qualify for reimbursement. If a family does not turn in a completed form, they are considered to be over income. If you have an incomplete form, please be sure to get the information it needs to be complete, otherwise it does not count and the meals served to that child or children do not qualify for reimbursement. Children are automatically eligible for free meals if the family/household receives Food Stamps (also known as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program ,SNAP), TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), or FDPIR (Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations). They must have a 10 digit case number listed on the form. **If one child in a household is receiving SNAP, FDPIR, or TANF benefits, all other children in the household are categorically eligible for free meals.** If a child receives Denali Kid Care or any other medical assistance that does not make them automatically eligible. If a child in the family is a foster child, the foster child is automatically eligible for free meals. This does not make all children in the household eligible for free meals, only the foster child is eligible for free meals. One Income Eligibility Form may be used for the household, but income must be determined for the remaining children in the household. Homeless children are also categorically eligible for free meals. Documentation of homelessness should be provided by the Dept. of Educations Homeless Liason (Kay Holmes). All Income Eligibility Forms must be completed to its entirety. It must contain the adult signature and the last 4 digits of the adults Social Security Number or the adult must indicate that they do not have a SSN. If categorically eligible, the income eligibility form must have the 10 digit case number listed The eligibility determination either eligible or ineligible for free or reduced price meals must be indicated The date and initial or signature of the determining official must be included

17 Alaska Native/Migrant Sites
Sponsors must submit information obtained from Alaska Native/Migrant organization that certifies that the site predominantly serves Alaska Native/Migrant children Operate as area-eligible open, or restricted sites Reimbursed for up to 3 meals, or snacks per day for each eligible participant Eligibility must be established annually. Alaska Native sites and Migrant sites must certify that the site serves predominantly (greater than 50%) Alaska Native or Migrant Children. Sponsors must obtain documentation on letterhead from either the Alaska Native organization or the Migrant Organization or School District. Alaska Native and Migrant sites operate like area-eligible open, or restricted open sites and are reimbursed for meals (up to 3 meals or snacks) served to all attending children (cannot be an enrolled site, must be publicly known that all children within the site location may attend). Site eligibility for these sites must be updated annually. ELIGIBILITY DOCUMENTATION CERTIFICATION FROM ALASKA NATIVE OR MIGRANT ORGANIZATION/SCHOOL DISTRICT

18 NSLP Sponsors Serves academic summer school participants only
May receive reimbursement through the NSLP & School Breakfast Program (SBP) Serves academic summer school participants AND children residing in the area served May receive reimbursement through the SFSP May receive reimbursement through the NSLP Seamless Summer Option (SSO) Schools offering academic summer school programs that wish to serve meals only to children enrolled in the summer school programs may receive reimbursement through the NSLP & SBP ONLY. Schools offering academic summer school programs that wish to serve meals to children enrolled in the summer school programs AND children in the community at large, may operate an open site through the SFSP or the NSLP Seamless Summer Option. SFA’s must ensure that these sites are open not only to children enrolled in summer school, but to any children residing in the area served by the site. Schools that operate summer school programs may not enroll in the SFSP as a restricted open site instead of an open site.

19 Site Selection When selecting sites please consider the following factors: Administrative & operating capability Location Staffing Meal service facilities Site activities Serving capacity Sponsors must assume all administrative and financial responsibility for all SFSP operations at all sites under their supervision. When selecting sites it is important to consider your administrative capability as a sponsor. You must be sure to plan to operate programs that are consistent with the size of your administrative staff, and the extent of your expertise. It is important that sponsors adequately evaluate the needs and resources of the areas they hope to serve before making final plans for site operations. To support the greatest summer meal participation it is important that sponsors do not compete for the same sites, or target children in the same geographical area. In some circumstances, it may be appropriate for sponsors to operate sites in relatively close physical proximity to one another. Sponsors should not select sites where site supervisors have had a poor performance record in the past. It is very important for the Sponsor to adequately train all site staff and maintain the sites staffing needs in order to ensure a proper meal service. A sites meal service facility, and meal service method is important when selecting sites. If sponsors prefer onsite meal preparation, the site should be properly equipped with the appropriate facilities and equipment for meal preparation and service and the site should meet all State and local public health standards. If sponsor plans to have meals prepared or delivered by a FSMC, School food service, or a central kitchen the food preparation, holding and delivery capabilities should be checked. Children are drawn to locations that offer educational, enrichment and recreational activities, as well as sites that provide meals. Sponsors are strongly encouraged to chose sites, or plan programs that offer these organized activities. Sponsors also need to determine the serving capacity for each of their sites. Sponsors should consider each sites administrative capability, the physical capacity of each site, and the number of children living in the area of each site who are likely to participate.

20 Outreach Ideas for outreach
Alaska Summer Food website: Contact State Agency to input site locations and times Alaska 211 website: Send out informational flyers, brochures, posters, postcards, etc. to families Alaska Summer Food Service Program banners USDA SFSP Kickoff Week June 11th-15th USDA SFSP Outreach Toolkit It’s important that area families are made aware of the site locations and availability of meals. As sponsors we should be trying to outreach to as many needy children as we can. Some ideas for outreach include: Input site locations and times in AK Summer Food Website Input site locations and times in Alaska 211 database Send out informational flyers, brochures, posters, postcards, etc. to families about the availability of meals in their area Request Alaska Summer Food Service Program banners from the State agency Hold a Summer Kickoff Event. The national SFSP Kickoff Week is June 11th-15th. You may hold a bbq event or dinner and a movie night to start the Summer Program off, inviting all kids and families around the community to join you for your event. For more ideas, use the USDA SFSP Outreach Toolkit. This toolkit will provide you with creative ideas to outreach to children in your area.

21 Alaska Summer Food The Alaska Summer Food Website was created by Michael Blakeny, Youth and Community Outreach Minister for Grandview Baptist Church (past SFSP Sponsor) . Each year, the aksummerfood.com website is updated with a current site list of sites operating throughout the state. This website lists the exact site location, hours of meal service, days of operation, and contact information for each SFSP site. This website is an excellent outreach tool, and we encourage you to contact the state agency to have all of your sites listed on this website.

22 Alaska 211 Short presentation from Karen Bitzer, Alaska 211. For more information, contact Karen Bitzer at (907) or

23 Pre-Operational Requirements
Sponsors must notify the DEC or Municipality of Anchorage in writing of all prospective sites All food workers should obtain a Food Worker Card and/or Certified Food Protection Managers Certification (CFPM) Sponsors must visit all new sites and any sites that had operational problems in the previous year prior to approval. If you are unsure what your program needs, contact DEC or MUNI DEC - Muni - If you serve pre-packaged meals Food Worker Cards and/or CFPM is not required As soon as sponsors have chosen their prospective sites, sponsors must notify the health department in writing of all prospective site locations and meal times they intend to operate. A copy of the letter must be submitted to the State agency with the application. There are two food safety and sanitation departments in the State of Alaska. DEC covers the entire state of Alaska with the exception of the Municipality of Anchorage. The two departments may have different requirements. One of these requirements would be to obtain a Food Worker Card and/or have the Certified Food Protection Manager’s Certification. It is the sponsor’s responsibility to contact the appropriate department and find out the requirements for their particular organization. Prior to approval, sponsors must visit new sites and any sites that had operational problems in the previous years. This requirement may be waived by the SA for experienced SFSP sponsors, CACFP sponsors and SFA’s participating in the NSLP or SBP and who are in good standing in these programs.

24 Site Operation Operation Limitations
Sponsors may be approved to operate up to 200 sites and serve 50,000 children a day at all sites Sponsors that plan to administer a meal program at multiple unaffiliated sites should enter into an agreement with the responsible site supervisor or official. All sponsors are now approved to operate a maximum of 200 sites and a maximum total average daily attendance at all sites of 50,000 children. If you believe that your sponsoring organization will operate more than 200 sites or 50,000 children, please contact our State agency. Sponsors that plan to administer a meal program at multiple unaffiliated sites (vacation bible schools, or other recreational summer programs) should enter into an agreement with the site supervisor or responsible site official. The agreement should list, in specific terms, the responsibilities of the site supervisor for the food service program. This form is called the Sponsor/Site Agreement, and is included in your application packet.

25 Applications Complete online application and paper application forms due by June 15th or 30 days prior to first day of service. All new and returning sponsors are required to submit annual applications. New sponsors will have slightly more forms to complete and submit to our State agency. All applications, online and paper, must be completed and submitted by June 15th or 30 days prior to the first day of service. Please allow the State agency adequate time to review and approve your completed application. Sponsors will receive an approval letter and claim instructions after your application has been approved by the State agency. Sponsors may not claim any meals until their application has been approved.

26 Applying for SFSP There are two parts to the application process:
1. Online application which can be found on the CNP Web, includes: Sponsor Information Sheet Site Information Sheet(s) Budget (not applicable for schools) 2. Paper application enclosures (included in your packets & referenced on slide 53). These need to be filled out and returned either by fax or . A complete paper and online application are needed for program approval. There are two parts to the application process. The first part is completing the online portion of the application. This is found on the CNP Web database. The Sponsor Information Sheet, Site Information Sheet (one for each site) and budget, if applicable, must be completed. The second part is completing the paper application enclosed in your training packets. These forms must be completed and returned back to our State agency either by fax or . It is important that we receive both the online and paper portion of the application in order for our State agency to approve you for 2013 participation.

27 Application NEW & RETURNING SPONSORS
1. CNP Web online application completed annually Sponsor Information Sheet Site Information Sheet (one for each site) Budget (not applicable for schools) 2. Addendum to Permanent Agreement (only for sponsors operating 25 sites or more) The first part of the application is completing the online application. All new and returning SFSP sponsors must complete the CNP Web online application annually. All new sponsors will need to complete the CNP Web User Authorization Request in order to gain access to the CNP Web. Login ID’s and passwords will be ed to each new individual that requested access. Once you have access, you’ll need to complete the CNP Web Online Application. You will need to complete the Sponsor Information Sheet, Site Information Sheet for all sites that you are operating and the budget, if applicable, online.

28 Web Addresses Child Nutrition Programs Main Website Summer Food Service Program Webpage CNP Web Login https://cnsonline.alaska.gov/cnpweb The State of Alaska Child Nutrition Programs Main website is found at the URL above. You will find all the Child Nutrition Programs webpage, including the Summer Food Service Program webpage and the CNP Web login, staff contact information and resources that may be helpful for your program.

29 CNP Web User Authorization
All new users must submit the CNP Web User Authorization Request. Each person needing access to the CNP Web database must have their own username and password. This needs to be submitted only once for each individual needing access. You must complete this form and submit it first to access the online application. This form may also be used to terminate any access for employees no longer needing access or employees that or no longer working for your organization.

30 CNP Web Login https://www.cnsonline.alaska.gov/cnpweb
Once you receive your username and password via , you will need to access the CNP Web database. You may access the CNP Web login through the Alaska Child Nutrition Programs Main Website or by typing in the URL shown. It is a good idea to bookmark this page. You will enter your username ID given and password in the login page and click login. https://www.cnsonline.alaska.gov/cnpweb

31 CNP Web Puzzle Page After the login page, you will be taken to the Puzzle Page. This shows all the Child Nutrition Programs from our State agency. You will have access to any programs that you have requested on the CNP Web User Authorization and Signatory Form. The Summer Food Service Program is the blue puzzle piece. You may click anywhere on the blue puzzle piece to enter. You can access the claims and the online application from here.

32 CNP Web Welcome Page Once you’ve clicked on the blue puzzle piece, you will be sent to the Welcome Page for SFSP. You can access all the recent and old USDA policy memos for SFSP as well as our contact information. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and click “continue”.

33 CNP Web Sponsor Summary
Packet Tab Sponsors must remember to click on the current year to complete the online application. You will be brought to the Sponsor Summary Page. This page will show you the status of your online application. The status will either say “Incomplete”, “Pending Submission”, “Pending Approval” or “Approved”. Incomplete means you have not started the form. Pending Submission means you have not submitted the forms to our State agency for Approval. Pending Approval means the State is in the process of approving your complete application and Approved means your online and paper application has been approved. For any forms or sites that are not approved, you can not claim meals for reimbursement. After you complete all the forms, you must click on the “Packet” tab at the top left to submit all your forms to the state for approval.

34 CNP Web Sponsor Summary
Application Tab To complete the online forms, you will need to click on the “Applications” tab to access the forms. Your Sponsor Info Sheet, Budget and all Site Info Sheets will come up. You must click the “Add” button to complete the Sponsor Info Sheet. As soon as you complete this form, the Budget Sheet will come up and so on. For any sites that you will not be operating or any new sites that are not listed, please notify our State agency to deactivate or add new sites.

35 Application NEW & RETURNING SPONSORS Paper Application
Site Information Summary Public Release and Policy on Free Meals Site Eligibility Documentation (one for each site) DEC/MOA Notification Letter (fax/ to both DEC and State Agency) Sponsor/Site Agreement (one for each unaffiliated site) School Acknowledgement (for sites operating in schools) Pre-Operational Visit Worksheet (one for each new and problem sites) Meal Service Documentation (more info on slide 63) The second part of the application is completing the paper portion. All new and returning SFSP sponsors must complete the following forms and submit to our State agency for approval: Site Information Summary Public Release and Policy on Free Meals Training Agenda & Sign-In Site Eligibility Documentation (one for each site) Health Department Notification Letter (fax/ to both DEC and State agency) Sponsor/Site Agreement (one for each site) Pre-Operational Visit (one for each new and problem sites from the previous year)

36 Application ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR NEW SPONSORS:
Submit Permanent Agreement with State of Alaska Only needs to be done once and updated only when designated official changes at the sponsoring organization. Documentation of tax-exempt status or letter identifying the unit of government or tribal organization they are affiliated with (churches are exempt from this requirement). CNP Web User Authorization Request 4. New Vendor Questionnaire (if never done business with SOA) New SFSP sponsors must submit the Summer Food Service Program Permanent Agreement with the State of Alaska. This form is completed once and updated only when the designated official changes at the sponsoring organization. Only one permanent agreement will need to be on file for all child nutrition programs the sponsoring organization participates in. All new SFSP sponsors must submit documentation of tax-exempt status or letter identifying the unit of government or tribal organization you are affiliated with. Churches are the only organization that are exempt from this requirement. If at any time during the program year, your tax exempt status is revoked, you must contact our State agency. All new sponsors will need access to the CNP Web database. Individuals needing access must complete and submit a CNP Web User Authorization Request. This form needs to be completed only once for each new user. New users will receive a new username and password to get access to the CNP Web. If you’re a returning sponsor that forgot your CNP Web User name or password, please contact the State Agency for assistance.

37 Sponsor Application Contains General Sponsor Information
Responsible parties Training information Monitoring schedule Advance information Audit requirements DUNS number (see informational handout in your training packet) The Sponsor Application includes all general sponsor information: Responsible sponsor parties Training information Monitoring schedule Advance information Audit requirements Duns number: All Child Nutrition Sponsors must register for a DUNS number through the Dunn & Bradstreet website. Please see the informational handout for more specific information.

38 State Agency has 30 days to approve all applications
Site Application Each site must be approved by the State Agency prior to it’s first day of operation. Sites may be added anytime during the program year. Once a complete site application packet is approved, it will be added to the CNP Web as one of your sites. State Agency has 30 days to approve all applications All Site Information Sheets must be complete for each site your sponsoring organization plans to operate for the summer. Each site must be approved prior to it’s first day of operation. Sponsors may add additional sites anytime during the program year. Sponsors must submit a complete application for all new sites. Once a complete application is submitted and approved, it will be added to the CNP Web as one of your sites. Please keep in mind that the State Agency has 30 days to approve all applications, and any changes made to applications. Please keep this in mind during the summer months when we are traveling regularly, and may not always be in the office to approve applications immediately.

39 Site Information Summary
Site Information Sheet(s) must include: Name of site Location of site Meal times Estimated average daily participation (ADP) Operation dates (start and end dates) Proposed monitoring schedule Sponsors must complete a Site Information Sheet for each site they intend to operate The Site Information Summary must include all sites that the sponsoring organization intends to operate. Each site listed must include the name of the site, the location, the meal types and meal times the site will serve, the estimated average daily participation (ADP), and the operation dates (start and end dates). It is important to remember sites may only operate when the area schools are closed for summer vacation. Sites may not claim meals for children when school is still in session. The bottom portion of the Site Information Summary is the proposed Monitoring schedule. All sites must be listed on the schedule. The name of the monitor conducting the visit or review must be listed as well as the dates of each site visit or review.

40 Public Release & Policy on Free Meals
Open, Alaska Native and Migrant Public Release & Policy on Free Meals: Submitted to various media outlets in the area served by the sponsor after SA approval Publicizes availability of free meals Explains same meal will be served to all children regardless of reimbursement rate, and without discrimination This is the Public Release and Policy for Free Meals for Open, Alaska Native and Migrant Sites. Sponsors are required to submit a media release of the availability of free meals serving the area the sponsor is operating feeding sites at to various media outlets including newspapers, television and radio stations, web sites, bulletin boards, etc. This form must be submitted with your application. Once your application has been approved by our State agency, it must be sent to the proposed media outlets.

41 Public Release & Policy on Free Meals
Camps and Enrolled sites Public Release & Policy on Free Meals includes: Availability of free meals, non-discrimination statement, and complaint procedures for Civil Rights violations Publicizes availability of free meals Same meals served to all children regardless of reimbursement status and without discrimination. Camps that charge separately for meals must explain: Camp uses Alaska eligibility standards Accepts income eligibility forms from SNAP or TANF This is the Public Release and Policy on meals for Camps and Enrolled sites. The Public Release & Policy must include the availability of free meals, non discrimination statement, and complaint procedure if an individual wishes to file a complaint for violation of nondiscrimination policy. For enrolled sites, the Public Release and Policy must explain that the same meal is served to all enrolled children regardless of reimbursement status and without discrimination. For camps that charge separately for meals must also explain that the camp uses Alaska’s eligibility standards for family size and income levels at the level of reduced-price school meals. Sponsors may submit the public release to any media outlet. If the media outlet charges money, you may decline. You may submit this form with the statement of declining the media option if it charges money. Technically, sponsors have fulfilled the requirement but are encouraged to try a different media outlet. This form must be included in the enrollment packets for camps and enrolled sites. Sponsors may submit this form to the State agency indicating the date the enrollment packets were sent out to the families.

42 Training Agenda & Sign-In
This is a sample of the Training Agenda & Sign-In. All trainings must be documented. Sponsors will submit all training information online on the CNP Web Application. The Training Agenda & Sign-in does not need to be submitted to the State Agency, but all trainings must be documented on the training form created by USDA (forms should be completed to their entirety) and kept on file at the Sponsor level for 3 years + the current year. The State Agency will verify training documentation at the time of review.

43 Site Eligibility Documentation
Sponsors are responsible for determining and documenting the eligibility of the sites you are operating. Each site type may require different eligibility documentation. Sponsors must submit site eligibility documentation for each site you intend to operate. Sponsors are responsible for determining the eligibility of each site and must have the documentation of each site’s eligibility. Not all sites will have the same type of eligibility documentation. Alaska Native and Migrant sites will need to submit the Letter of Eligibility every year. Open sites using school data and census data will only need to be submitted every 5 years. However, all sites should reestablish site eligibility annually to help maintain eligibility. Enrolled sites or sites using free or reduced price school meal status from schools are only required to submit the number of enrolled and the number of students eligible for free or reduced price school meals in the CNP Web database. Camps and sites using income applications are not required to send in copies of income applications. For appropriate site eligibility documentation, please see Attachment 6 SFSP Site Definitions & Eligibility Documentation in your packets and in the Administrative Manual.

44 Health Department Notification Letter
Sponsors are required to submit to your local health department a list of sites you intend to operate a food service at, the specific location and meal service times for each site should be listed on the letter. A copy of the letter must be submitted to the State Agency with the application packet.

45 Sponsor/Site Agreement
Sponsors of unaffiliated sites must enter into an agreement with the site supervisor or the responsible site official. The sponsor/site agreement lists the responsibilities of the site supervisor for the food service program. Both the site supervisor and the sponsor must sign the agreement to ensure the duties of each are understood. If the site is under the fiscal responsibility of a school district, the superintendent’s signature is required. A copy of each sponsor/site agreement must be submitted with your application even if your are unsure of who the site supervisor is yet. Our State agency will follow-up with Sponsors with TBA Sponsor/Site Agreements and will be asked to submit a copy of the completed form.

46 School Acknowledgement Form
The National School Lunch Act requires the State agency to give priority to local school food authorities to operate a food service program at a site. If there are sponsors (not applicable for school sponsors) that wish to operate an unaffiliated site in a school, you must submit the School Acknowledgement of SFSP in Schools form. This allows the School District to decline the option of sponsoring the SFSP at the school. This form needs to be submitted only once as a new site with your application.

47 DUNS/CCR Registration
DUNS number is required for all programs CCR Registration is required for all programs receiving $25,000 or more in federal funds Refer to DUNS and CCR handouts in your packet for information on how to obtain a DUNS number and register with the CCR

48 Application NEW & RETURNING SPONSORS
Meal Service Documentation (if app.) Waiver for Unitized Meals Agreement between Sponsor and School to Furnish Food Vended Meal Service Contract School Acknowledgement Form Site Application for Unaffiliated Sites For all new and returning sponsors, the following forms must be submitted with your application if it applies to your meal service and program: Waiver for Unitized Meals Agreement between Sponsor and School to Furnish Food Vended Meal Service Contract School Acknowledgement Form Site Application for Unaffiliated Sites

49 Waiver for Unitized Meals
Sponsors that purchase meals from a vendor that are not unitized must submit a Waiver for Unitized Meals Must explain how meals will be assembled and served Unitized Meal Waivers must be submitted to the State in writing in sufficient time for the SA to respond prior to bid advertising For sponsors that purchase meals from a Food Service Management Company or School Food Authorities, those agencies must provide you with unitized meals. The unitized meals requirement specifies that the meal components (except milk or juice) must be packaged, delivered and served as a unit. The milk or juice may be packaged and provided separately, but must be served with the meal in order for it to be a complete and reimbursable meal. For those agencies that do not provide unitized meals, sponsors must submit a Waiver to Unitized Meals. Both the FSMC or School Food Authority and the Sponsor must sign the agreement and a copy must be submitted with your application. Meals that are not packaged and/or delivered unitzed are considered incomplete meals and therefore, are not reimburseable meals.

50 Program Payments 2013 SFSP Reimbursement Rates Advance Payments
Sponsor Budget Claims for reimbursement The Summer Food Service Program is a reimbursement program. Sponsors should be able to cover the costs up front. However, there are advance payments available for those sponsors needing it. Advance payments should help sponsors maintain a positive cash flow because they will have funds available to meet program costs as they arise throughout the month.

51 2013 SFSP Reimbursement Rates
USDA releases the new SFSP Reimbursement Rates every January. Sponsors receive the combined reimbursement rate depending on the location and type of site. Self-Prep sites are sites that prepare their own meals at each individual site or at a central location and deliver meals to each site. Self-Prep sites will receive the higher administrative reimbursement rate whereas Vended sites are sites that purchase unitized meals from either a vendor, school food authority or food service management company. In Alaska, Anchorage is the only recognized Urban area. Therefore, Vended sites located in Anchorage will receive the combined lower reimbursement rate. All other vended sites outside of Anchorage will receive the higher administrative reimbursement rate. Programs are reimbursed based on the number of reimbursable meals served to eligible participants multiplied by the sum of the appropriate administrative and operational rates. All self-prep and rural vended sites will receive the higher reimbursement rate.

52 Advance Payments Sponsors may request advance payments for their total program costs, for their operating costs, or for their administrative costs. Request advance payments on Sponsor Info Sheet in the CNP Web Advance payments are reconciled from the claim month that the advance was requested. Additional advances cannot be issued until the prior advance has been reconciled with a claim. Advance Payment Requests are due by: April 15th with complete application Sponsors may request advance payments for their total program costs, for their operating costs or for their administrative costs. Sponsors must request advance payments on the Sponsor Info Sheet in the CNP Web database and submit a complete application by April 15th. Sponsors are not required to categorize costs as operational or administrative when submitting claims for reimbursement, but advance payments are still categorized as such. Therefore, sponsors may not request an advance for operating and administrative costs combined, but must make these requests separately. Sponsors may not choose the amount of the advance given. Advance payments are calculated based on the anticipated daily participation and the rate paid for the meal served. If the sponsor is a returning sponsor, the State agency may choose to give an advance payment based on the reimbursement earned during the same month from the previous year. The dates of the advance payments are: June 1st, July 15th, and August 15th. All advance payments will be recovered out of your reimbursement checks from the month of the advance requested. All advance payments must be reconciled from the claims for reimbursement prior to receiving the next advance. For example, if your organization receives an advance for the month of June, the June claim must be submitted before a July advance can be issued.

53 Budget The budget is part of the application process online. It must capture all estimated administrative and operating expenses. Administrative costs include planning, organizing and administering the program Operational costs include the cost of food used, nonfood supplies, preparing, serving and clean up of meals and meal service area. Please see Allowable Summer Food Service Program Expenses and Required Documentation All sponsors must complete a budget, except for experienced school sponsors. The budget is part of the application process online and it must capture all estimated administrative and operating expenses. Program payments are not based on the budget, it just shows the State agency how you plan to spend your reimbursement. If you spend all your reimbursement on food and labor, those are the only things that you may need to include in your budget. To help estimate your program income from SFSP, you can take the number of meals you plan to serve for the summer and multiply it by the reimbursement rate (multiple site sponsors may have a different reimbursement rate for each site). This will give you a total income you plan to receive for the summer. You may use this total to decide how that money will be spent using allowable administrative and operational costs in your budget. Administrative costs may include activities related to planning, organizing and administering the program. Operational costs may include, but are not limited to, the cost of food used, nonfood supplies, labor in preparing, serving and clean up of meals and the meal service area. For an additional list of Allowable Expenses in SFSP, please see the Allowable Summer Food Service Program Expenses and Required Documentation worksheet in your packets. For a list of unallowable costs, please see the Administrative Manual.

54 Budget Audit Requirements
If your agency receives over $500,000 in federal funding in total for all Programs operated during the year, a program specific audit is required. The online application will ask for this information if exceeding $500,000. You have 9 months past the end of your fiscal year to submit your audit. If your organization receives more than $500,000 in Federal Funds total for all Programs operated during the year (not just income you receive from Child Nutrition Programs), you are required to have a program specific Audit. You are required to submit your audit to the State Agency OMB office at least 9 months past the end of your fiscal year. You must input this information in the CNP Web database in the online application.

55 Claims for Reimbursement
Due no later than 60 days past the end of the claim month Needs to be in PENDING APPROVAL by due date (see claim calendar) Sponsors may consolidate claims if the program operates: 10 days or less in the initial month of operation combined with the claim for the following month 10 days or less in the final month combined with the claim from the previous month Sponsors should collect meal counts from each site at least weekly, and should aim to have their monthly claims for reimbursement submitted within 10 days after the last day of the claiming month. Sponsors are required to submit claims for reimbursement that indicate the number and type of first and second meals served to all eligible children by site no later than 60 days after the last day of the claiming month. The CNP Web database will check the information on your claim against the information on your site sheet. If you find an error on your claim, you may need to check the site information sheet to see if the correct information is there. Claims will not be accepted after 60 days past the end of the claim month (remember to think 60 days not 2 months). Any claims submitted past the deadline, may need to request a Late Claim Exception. These exceptions are only granted once every 36 months. Sponsors may choose to consolidate claims if the program either operates: 10 days or less in the initial month of operation. The initial month may be combined with the following month. OR 10 days or less in the final month of operation. The final month may be combined with the claim from the previous month

56 Claims for Reimbursement
To justify claims for reimbursement, sponsors must maintain the following records: Daily meal counts Program operating costs Program administrative costs Any Fund accruing to the program Records must be kept 3 years plus the current year at the Sponsor level. Sponsors receive their program payments based on the number of meals served multiplied by the appropriate combined administrative and operating rates for reimbursement. Claims for reimbursement must reflect only meals that meet SFSP requirements and are actually served to eligible children during the claiming period. Sponsors must be able to document meal counts, program operating and administrative costs and any funds accruing to the program. Sources of funds that are considered program income may include: Cash donations specifically identified for use in the program; and Any Federal, State or local funds specifically provided to the program Sponsors must input any additional program income in the CNP Web database with the online application.

57 Training Sponsors are required to annually attend State agency training and must train all administrative and site staff before they undertake their responsibilities. Training is an annual federal requirement. All sponsors, new and returning, must attend State agency SFSP training annually. In addition sponsors must train all administrative and site staff before they undertake their responsibilities.

58 Training (cont.) Basic Training Requirements:
Staff should receive notification of training Date, time, location, and importance of training session All staff trainings must be documented Date, name of attendees, and topics discussed Separate trainings for staffing groups Administrative staff training Monitor personnel training Site staff training Sites may not operate until site staff have been trained. All staff should receive a letter, flyer, or announcing the date, time, location, and importance of attending their training session. It is highly recommended that sponsors remind staff of the training session shortly before the date of the session. The dates, names of attendees, and documentation of the topics covered must be recorded for each training session offered. Training should be conducted prior to the start of the program. It is required that each site must have at least one trained person present during times of the meal service. If there are new employees, the sponsor must train the employee on program requirements prior to starting. Sites may not operate until site staff have been trained. Because there are different groups of staff (administrative, monitor, and site) that have different program responsibilities, it is recommended that sponsors offer different training sessions to focus on each groups specific functions.

59 Administrative Staff Training
Administrative staff training should cover: Basic program information How the program will operate within the framework outlined in the SFSP 2013 Administrative Guide Specific duties of monitors Monitors should attend both the Site and Administrative Trainings The administrative staff training will explain the responsibilities and duties of all sponsor personnel helping to administer the SFSP at the sponsor level. These personnel include the office staff (assistants, clerks, bookkeepers, and secretaries), area supervisors, and most importantly the monitoring staff. Administrative staff training should begin with a general explanation of the program, emphasizing the purpose of the program, site eligibility, recordkeeping requirements, organized site activity, meal requirements, and nondiscrimination compliance. Secondly, a description of how the program will operate should be covered. Program operation topics include how meals will be provided (meal service), meal delivery schedule (if app.), and recordkeeping requirements. Lastly, the administrative training should cover the specific duties of your programs monitors. Monitor topics include: conducting site visits/reviews, responsible sites of each monitor, monitoring schedule, reporting procedure, follow-up procedure, and office procedures. *Monitors should attend both the Admin & Site Training

60 Monitor Personnel Training
Monitor personnel training should cover: Sites they are responsible for Conducting site visits/reviews Reporting procedures Follow-up procedures Food Safety and Sanitation Civil Rights Reporting of racial/ethnic data Monitors should attend both the Site and Administrative Trainings Monitors should be present at both the site and administrative training to ensure a comprehensive understanding of program operations at both the site and administrative level. Sponsors must provide monitors with a thorough training because only monitors that are knowledgeable of the program requirements and duties will be able to provide meaningful feedback. Because monitoring is such an important function of proper program operations and full meal reimbursements, sponsors should conduct separate training sessions for monitors that highlight their specific duties. If a monitor is hired after program operations have began, a separate training session that covers program operations at both the site and administrative level must be conducted prior to the monitors first site visit or review. This training should at least cover the following topics: What sites each monitor is responsible for Monitoring schedules Their duties in conducting site visits and reviews Any reporting and/or follow-up procedures Food Safety & Sanitation Civil Rights Office procedures And reporting of racial/ethnic data There are templates for all site visits and reviews found in the Administrative Manual. Monitors must complete the required site visits and reviews for each site operating.

61 Site Staff Training Site staff training should cover:
How the site will operate Recordkeeping requirements Point of service meal counts Meal Pattern requirements Menu Use of leftover food Civil Rights Monitors responsibilities At least one trained site staff must be present during ALL meal services Regulations require that sites may not operate until personnel at the site have attended at least one training session. This is an annual requirement. Sponsors must document the attendance at site training sessions, and schedule additional sessions for those staff who are unable to attend or who are absent. It is also a regulatory requirement that at least one person who has been trained by the sponsor be present at each of the sponsors sites during the time of meal service. If a site supervisor resigns during the summer, the sponsor is responsible for ensuring that the new site supervisor receives all necessary training before taking charge of a new site. Some basic topics that should be covered include: Basic program information How each site will operate (delivery schedules, adjustments to deliveries, who to contact about problems, inventory, meal preparation adjustments, etc.) Recordkeeping requirements Point of service meal counts Meal pattern requirements Menus Use of leftover food Civil rights Monitors responsibilities Documentation of the training, topics covered and attendance must be kept on file.

62 Monitoring Sponsors must ensure that the following minimum monitoring requirements are met: Pre-operational Visits Site Visits Site Reviews An efficient and capable monitoring staff is essential for successful program operations. The monitor serves as the direct link between the sponsor and the food service site. The number of monitors will depend on the number of sites that the sponsor intends to operate. There are different requirements for new or returning sites. Site visits require a monitor to ensure that the food service is operating smoothly, they may not need to be present during the entire meal service. However, site reviews requires a monitor to determine if the site is meeting all program requirements. Therefore, the monitor must be present before, during and after the meal service.

63 Monitoring (cont.) Site Visits and Reviews Pre-Operational Visit
Required for all new sites and problem sites before they begin operating. First Week Visit Required to visit all new and problem sites within the first week of operation There are four different site visits and reviews that monitors may need to conduct. Template forms of these site visits and reviews can be found in the Administrative Manual. Pre-Operational Visit – Sponsors/monitors should visit all new and problem sites before they begin operations. These visits are required to make sure that the sites have the facilities to provide meal services for the number of children expected to attend. The Pre-Operational Visit Worksheet available in the Sponsor Admin Guide should be used to complete Pre-Operational Site visits, and should be completed to its entirety. Documentation of Pre-Operational visits will be verified on-site. First Week Site Visit – this site visit must be completed for all new sites and any returning sites that had problems in the previous year. Returning sites that operated a successful food service program in the previous year may be exempt from this requirement.

64 Monitoring (cont.) Fourth Week Review Ethnic/Racial Data
Required to review all sites during the first four weeks of program operation Ethnic/Racial Data Required to collect ethnic/racial data of participating children annually by each site (residential camps must collect data for each session of camp) Fourth Week Site Review – this site review must be completed for all new and returning sites. This site review must be completed within the first four weeks of operation. For those sites that operate less than four weeks, the sponsor must conduct the review within the time period the site is operational. For instance, if a new site only operates for one week in the summer, the pre-operational visit, first week site visit and the fourth week site review must be completed in that first week of operation. Racial/Ethnic Data – sponsors must collect ethnic/racial category data each year for each site. Sponsors may use visual identification to determine a child participant’s ethnic racial category. This data must be kept on file. In addition, sponsors must determine the number of potentially eligible participants by ethnic/racial category for the area served. Sponsors may obtain this information from either census data or public school enrollment data. This information must be put in the CNP Web database with the online application. Documentation of this data must be determined annually and kept on file.

65 Monitoring (cont.) Reviewing Reports All questions should be answered
Problems should be noted Include comments in the remarks section Ensure meal counts are taken appropriately Recommend corrective action, if any, and follow-up Recommend adjustments in meal orders to avoid excess meals Sign and date reports After monitors complete the site visits/reviews reports, sponsors must review the reports. Sponsors should be aware of the following, on the monitoring reports: All site visits and reviews must be documented. Records are only useful when they are carefully reviewed by sponsor personnel, and when follow-up monitoring is scheduled to ensure that any corrective actions have been taken to improve site operations. Good review reports will meet the following criteria: All questions are answered Problems, if any, are noted Comments are included, if any, in the remarks section Meal counts are taken appropriately Recommend corrective action, if any, and follow-up Recommend adjustments in meal orders to avoid excess meals Report is signed and dated by monitor

66 Administrative Reviews
Sponsors are reviewed in accordance with USDA Federal Review requirements. In accordance with USDA Federal requirements, the State agency is required to conduct Administrative Reviews of sponsors’ program operations to ensure that the sponsor’s overall program is operating in compliance with program requirements and to provide technical assistance to a sponsor if there are questions about program operations.

67 Administrative Reviews
New sponsors will have two reviews during their first year Pre-approval review First year review All sponsors will have a State Administrative Review at least every 3 years USDA may conduct one or more Federal Reviews each summer A State administrative review will consist of a review of site operations, including observing the meal service operations, recordkeeping, how the claim for reimbursement is gathered, and procedures. All new sponsors will receive two reviews in your first year of program operations, a pre-approval review and a first year review. After a complete application has been submitted and approved our State agency will come out to your organization and conduct a pre-approval review before the first day of operating the SFSP. All returning sponsors will have a State Administrative Review at least every 3 years. However, the State agency may pull forward to the current year, a sponsor that is up for review next year to meet Federal review requirements.

68 Corrective Action When the State Agency finds violations during a review, it will require the sponsor to correct the problems found. The State Agency will initiate a follow-up system to ensure that sponsors take the specific action for correcting violations. List of program violations can be found on page 95 of your Admin Guide When the State Agency finds violations during a review, it will require the sponsor to correct the problems found. A corrective action plan is left with the sponsor to complete, and documentation of the corrective action must be sent to the State Agency within a prescribed timeframe, generally no more than 2 weeks. If any meal service violations are observed during a site review, all meals are disallowed. We do not have the ability to be flexible with this issue. The State Agency will initiate a follow-up system to ensure that sponsors take the specific action for correction violations. Violations of program requirements may result in withholding, or recovery of reimbursements, temporary suspension, or termination and exclusion from future program participation.

69 SFSP Deadlines Complete applications must be received by April 15th in order to receive advance payments. All others: Applications must be received 30 days prior to your first day of operation and no later than June 15th. Sponsor and sites must be approved before the meal service starts.

70 Recordkeeping Sponsors must maintain records for 3 years plus the current year. Sponsors are required to maintain all SFSP records for 3 years plus the current year or longer if required by the State agency. These records must be available for State agencies to review.

71 Recordkeeping Sponsors must maintain the following records:
Permanent Agreement SFSP Application Daily meal counts Operating & Labor Costs Administrative Costs Claims for reimbursement Training Site Visits and Reviews Procurement records Checklist of Records (attachment 22) 2013 SFSP Administrative Manual At a minimum, all sponsors must maintain the following records for 3 years plus the current year: Permanent Agreement SFSP applications Daily meal counts Daily production records Operating costs Administrative costs Claims for reimbursement Training Site visits and reviews A specific list of a Checklist of Records to maintain are found in Chapter 5 or Attachment 22 of the Administrative Manual.

72 Civil Rights All sponsors and staff must review civil rights information annually. Civil Rights PowerPoint Civil Rights Automated PowerPoint

73 Resources Spend some time on our website: Information is available about: Food Safety Traditional Foods Forms & Templates Training Materials USDA Links Nutrition Resources Contact information for other SFSP sponsors and much more…

74 Meal Service Sponsor Training 2013

75 Purpose of SFSP The goal of the SFSP is to ensure nutritious breakfasts, lunches, suppers, and snacks are served to children when school is not in session.

76 SFSP Program Basics Health Safety & Sanitation Meal Preparation
Meal Pattern Requirements Meal Components Creditable Foods/ Non-Creditable Foods Meal Service Menu Planning Cycle Menus Production Records Resources We will cover some of the program basics of the meal service component of the SFSP.

77 Health Safety & Sanitation
State of Alaska Department of Environment Conservation (DEC) Municipality of Anchorage (MUNI) Food Worker Cards Certified Food Protection Manager Sponsors and sites must meet the health standards established by State and local health departments. Sponsors/sites located in Anchorage will be required to meet the standards establish by MUNI, all other sponsors/sites will be required to meet the standards established by DEC. All sponsors should contact their local health department to find out what standards they should be following.

78 Health Safety & Sanitation
The Alaska Food Safety is in Your Hands workbook was created for use in Child Nutrition Programs. All information aligns with DEC requirements. This handbook is a VERY useful tool for all things related to health safety & sanitation. Please use these books as necessary in order to ensure safe and clean food service, preparation, and storage environments. The 2013 USDA Nutrition Guidance for Sponsors handbook is also an excellent resource for ensuring proper health safety & sanitation at each site.

79 Commodities SFSP Sponsors eligible to receive USDA Foods (commodities) are: Sponsors preparing meals onsite or at a central kitchen; Sponsors purchasing meals from an SFA that participates in the NSLP; and SFA Sponsors that procure their SFSP meals from the same FSMC that competitively provided their NSLP and/or SBP meals. Please contact the State Agency if you’re interested in the Commodity Program Some SFSP Sponsors have the ability to receive USDA Foods, which we refer to as commodities. SFSP Sponsors that can receive USDA commodities are: Sponsors preparing meals onsite or at a central kitchen Sponsors purchasing meals from an SFA that participates in the NSLP, and SFA Sponsors that procure their SFSP meals from the same FSMC that competitively provided their NSLP and/or SBP meals.

80 Meal Preparation Self-Prep Vended
Sponsors prepare meals at each site location or at a central kitchen Sponsors with self-prep sites receive the higher administrative reimbursement rate Vended Sponsors may purchase meals from a school or caterer A written agreement or a contract between the sponsor and vendor must be submitted with the Application Sponsors with sites in the Anchorage area receive the lower administrative reimbursement rate Sponsors may choose from several methods of providing meals to children. Sponsors may be: Self-prep – Sponsors prepare and assemble their own meals at each site location or at a central kitchen, depending on the facilities available at their sites. Sponsors that choose this option have maximum control over the quality of preparation. All self-prep sponsors will receive the higher administrative reimbursement rate. Vended – Sponsors purchase meals from a school or caterer. Sponsors must enter in an agreement with the Vendor or school food authority. A copy of the Vended Meal Agreement/Contract or Agreement to Furnish Food from a School Food Authority must be submitted with your application. Vended sites located in Anchorage will receive the lower administrative reimbursement rate.

81 Meal Preparation Food Service Management Company (FSMC)
Sponsor may contract with a FSMC to obtain and prepare unitized meals (submit waiver of unitized meals if FSMC does not unitize meals) Contract between sponsor and FSMC must be submitted with the Application Sponsors with sites in the Anchorage area receive the lower administrative reimbursement rate Food Service Management Companies – Sponsors may purchase unitized meals through a FSMC. A FSMC is a commercial enterprise or nonprofit organization with which a sponsor may contract for preparing unitized meals, with or without milk, for use in the program, or for managing a sponsor’s food service operations. A copy of the FSMC contract must be submitted with your application. Sponsors with sites in the Anchorage area will receive the lower administrative reimbursement rate.s If you plan on using a Food Service Management Company, please review Part III—Food Service Management Companies in your Administrative Guide. Please contact the State Agency with any questions.

82 Meal Pattern Requirements
All meals served must meet the meal pattern requirements. Meal patterns ensure that children receive well- balanced meals and minimum portions for each meal component that must be served in order to receive reimbursement for each meal. It is important that all meals served must meet the meal pattern requirements. The SFSP meal patterns allow sponsors to serve meals are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and ensures that children receive well-balanced meals and establish the minimum portions for each meal component that must be served to each child in order for the participating sponsor to receive reimbursement for a meal. For sponsors that also participate in NSLP or CACFP, it is important to remember that the NSLP/SBP and CACFP meal patterns are slightly different. Schools may continue to use the NSLP/SBP meal pattern. All others must follow the SFSP meal pattern.

83 Meal Pattern Requirements
For a breakfast to be a reimbursable meal, it must contain: Milk Fruit/Vegetable Grain/Bread A meat/meat alternate is optional For a breakfast to be a reimbursable meal, it must contain: Milk - one serving of milk=8 fluid oz or 1 cup Fruit/Vegetable- one serving of Vegetable/Fruit= ½ cup (4 fl. oz.) of fruit/veggie or full strength fruit or vegetable juice Grain/Bread - one serving Grain/Bread = 1 slice of bread or 1 serving of cornbread, biscuits, rolls muffins or ¾ cup of cold dry cereal ½ cup cooked pasta or noodle product or ½ cup cooked cereal Sponsors are not required to serve a meat/meat alternate at breakfast.

84 Meal Pattern Requirements
For lunch or supper to be a reimbursable meal, it must contain: Milk Fruit/Vegetable (2 servings) Grain/Bread Meat/Meat Alternate For a lunch or supper to be a reimbursable meal, it must contain: Milk - one serving of milk=8 fluid oz or 1 cup Vegetable/Fruit - one serving of Vegetable/Fruit= ¾ cup or ½ cup (6 fl. oz.) of full strength vegetable or fruit juice Grain/Bread - one serving Grain/Bread = 1 slice of bread or 1 serving of cornbread, biscuits, rolls muffins or ¾ cup of cold dry cereal ½ cup cooked pasta or noodle product or ½ cup cooked cereal Meat/Meat Alternate - one serving of Meat and Meat Alternates = 2oz lean meat, poultry, fish, cheese or 1 large egg, ½ cup of dry beans or peas, 4 tbsp of peanut butter, 1 oz of peanuts or soy nuts, 8 oz or 1 cup of yogurt

85 Meal Pattern Requirements
For a snack to be a reimbursable meal, it must contain two of these components: Milk Fruit/Vegetable Grain/Bread Meat/Meat Alternate For a snack to be a reimbursable meal, it must contain two of these components: Milk - one serving of milk=8 fluid oz or 1 cup Vegetable/Fruit - one serving of Vegetable/Fruit= ¾ cup or ¾ cup (6 fl. oz.) of full strength vegetable or fruit juice Grain/Bread - one serving Grain/Bread = 1 slice of bread or 1 serving of cornbread, biscuits, rolls muffins or ¾ cup of cold dry cereal ½ cup cooked pasta or noodle product or ½ cup cooked cereal Meat/Meat Alternate - one serving of Meat and Meat Alternates = 1oz lean meat, poultry, fish, cheese or ½ large egg, ¼ cup of dry beans or peas, 2 tbsp of peanut butter, 1 oz of peanuts or soy nuts, 4 oz or ½ cup of yogurt

86 Allowable Meal Pattern Exceptions
Infant Meals Follow CACFP Infant Meal Pattern (7 CFR (b)) Meals for children Age 1-6 May adjust portion sizes for younger children (7 CFR (c)) Meals for children Age 12-18 May adjust portion sizes for older children (7 CFR (c)) Meals prepared in Schools May use NSLP meal patterns (7 CFR and (a)) Occasionally, Sponsors may need to adapt their meal pattern to meet the nutrition needs of children of certain age groups. Sponsors may use the following meal patterns if necessary (please contact your SA prior to implementation of any meal patterns other than the SFSP meal pattern): Infant Meals: Sponsors must receive prior approval from the SA to serve meals to infants 1 year of age and younger. An infant’s dietary needs are based on individual development, and they may be more complicated than those of older children. All meals served to infants must comply with the infant meal pattern requirements in Section (b) of the CACFP regulations. Meals for Children Age 1-6: SFSP regulations allow for the adjusting of meal portion sizes for younger children. The sponsor must demonstrate to the SA that it can control portion sizes, and follow the age appropriate meal pattern requirements for children ages 1-6 in Section (c) of CACFP regulations. Meals for Children Age 12-18: The SFSP meal patterns specify the minimum portion of each food component for each meal and snack. Older children may have greater food needs, and sponsors may need to serve adult-size portions. Adult-size portions may be found in section (c) of CACFP regulations. Meals Prepared in Schools: Sponsors serving meals that are prepared in schools may, with PRIOR SA approval use the NSLP or SBP meal patterns. SFA sponsors may use the meal requirements of the NSLP or SBP instead of the SFSP meal patterns WITHOUT SA approval. NSLP and SBP meal patterns can be found in sections and (a) of NSLP regulations, and sections and 220.8(a) of SBP regulations. Again, please contact the SA if you think you need to follow a meal pattern other than the SFSP meal pattern.

87 Meal Components Milk Fruits/Vegetables Grains/ Breads
Meat/Meat Alternates There are four meal components: milk, fruits/vegetables, grains/breads, and meat/meat alternates. We will go into detail of each of the meal components.

88 Milk Fresh, fluid and pasteurized
Powered milk may be served if fresh milk is unavailable—use within 24 hours Nonfat or 1% milk for children 2 and up Contains vital nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein Help maintain bone mass Provide little or no saturated fat When serving milk, it should be fresh, fluid and pasteurized. It is recommended that nonfat or 1% milk for children 2 and up be served the lower fat milk. Milk provides lots of vital nutrients including calcium, potassium, vitamin D and protein. Milk also helps maintain bone mass and provides little or no saturated fat. The lower fat milk recommendation aligns with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and is a requirement for NSLP/SBP and CACFP, however, it is not a requirement for SFSP. Powdered Milk: Reconstitute so it tastes good – colder the better – flavoring it sometimes May reconstitute night ahead – must be used within 24 hours (DEC requirement) – date when made

89 Milk For breakfast and snack: For Lunch or Supper:
Milk can be served as a beverage, on cereal or as a beverage and on cereal For Lunch or Supper: Milk must be served as a beverage only Milk is required to be offered at all meals except snack. For breakfast and snack, milk can either be served as a beverage, on cereal or as a beverage and on cereal. For lunch or supper, milk must be served as a beverage only. For children who require it, serve alternative types of milk (reduce-lactose milk, or acidophilus). Sponsors do not have to make milk substitutions when a children has a lactose intolerance, unless a dr. has specified that it is a medical disability and this disability is documented with a medical statement.

90 Creditable as Milk Flavored Milk
Milkshakes containing minimum serving requirements (need a recipe) Smoothies containing minimum serving requirements (need a recipe) Lactose-reduced milk Acidified milk (Kefir, Acidophilus) Fortified & Pasteurized goat milk Some items that are creditable as milk include: Flavored milk Milkshakes that contain the minimum requirement servings (8 fl. oz.). For sponsors that choose to serve and credit milkshakes as milk, you must have a recipe. Lactose-reduced milk Acidified milk (Kefir, Acidophilus); and/or Fortified and Pasteurized goat milk

91 Not Creditable as Milk Soy Cream Rice or Coconut milk Drinkable Yogurt
medication statement or parent statement needed if meets substitute requirements (only 3 brands) Cream Rice or Coconut milk Drinkable Yogurt Non-pasteurized milk Milk incorporated into recipes Almond milk & other nut milk Non-fortified goat’s milk Evaporated milk Yogurt or cheese (meat alternate) Some items that are not creditable as milk include: Soy milk – there are only 3 brands that meet the nutritional requirements, Pacific Ultra Soy Milk, 8th Continent and Pearl Smart Soymilk. For sponsors that choose to provide a soy milk substitution must be one of the three brands listed and a medical or parent statement must be on file for the child with the substitution. Cream Rice or coconut milk Drinkable yogurt Non-pasteurized milk Milk incorporated into recipes, although it is recommended to use milk in recipes to prepare meals Almond milk & other nut milk Non-fortified goat’s milk Evaporated milk Yogurt or cheese – these items are considered meat alternates, not milk

92 Milk Substitutions Schools may offer a nondairy milk substitute to a student with a medical or special dietary need other than a disability. Schools may make the substitution only with a written request from a medical authority or parent/guardian (for schools only). All other SFSP Sponsors must have a medical statement on file for milk substitutions Any milk substitutions must meet the USDA’s nutrient requirements in order to receive reimbursements for these meals Pacific Ultra Soy Milk, 8th Continent Soy Milk and Pearl Smart Soymilk are the only nondairy milk substitutes that meet the USDA nutrient requirements. Schools participating in SFSP or Seamless Summer have the option of offering a nondairy milk substitute to a student with a medical or special dietary need other than a disability. Schools may make the substitution only with a written request from a medical authority or parent/guardian requesting the substitution. If any substitution is made it must meet the USDA’s nutrient requirements in order to receive reimbursements for these meals. There are only 3 nondairy milk substitute brands that meet these requirements, Pacific Ultra Soy Milk, 8th Continent Soy Milk and Pearl Smart Soymilk. Other SFSP sponsors that decide to offer a nondairy milk substitute to a child with a medical or special dietary need that is not a disability must have a medical statement on file for that child. The milk substitute must meet the USDA’s nutrient requirements.

93 Milk Substitutions Nutrient Milk Substitute Nutrition Standards Unit
RDI % Daily Value 2,000 kcal/day Calcium 276 Mg 1000mg 27.6% Protein 8 G 50g 16% Vitamin A 500 IU 5000IU 10% Vitamin D 100 400IU 25% Magnesium 24 400mg 6% Phosphorus 222 22.2% Potassium 349 3500mg Riboflavin .44 1.7mg 25.9% Vitamin B12 1.1 Mcg 6mcg 18.3% Here is a list of the nutrient requirements for nondairy milk substitutes. USDA and our State agency are continuing to find more nondairy milk substitutes that meet the nutrient requirements.

94 Creditable as Meat/Meat Alternates
Poultry, fish or lean meat Cheese, cheese sauces, and cheese substitutes Eggs Cooked dry beans or peas Nut butters (peanut) or seed butters Peanuts, soy nuts, tree nuts or seeds Yogurt: plain, sweetened, or flavored 4 oz. for breakfast or snack 8 oz. for lunch or supper The following food items are creditable as meat/meat alternates: Poultry, fish or lean meats. It’s best to concentrate on lean meats. Cheese, cheese sauces, and cheese substitutes Eggs Cooked dry beans or peas Nut butters such as peanut or seed butters Peanuts, soy nuts, tree nuts or seeds Any plain, sweetened or flavored yogurt. Just a reminder that if you choose to serve yogurt for breakfast or snack, you must serve at least 4 oz for it to be creditable and 8 oz must be served for lunch or supper

95 Meat/Meat Alternates Nuts and seeds may fulfill only ½ of the requirement for lunch or supper Peanut butter or other nut butters are not recommended to use only to meet the requirement – too much and difficult for children to eat Frozen yogurt or other yogurt-flavored snack products are not creditable Dried beans or peas do not count as a vegetable and a meat alternate in the same meal Nuts and seeds may be served to fulfill the meat/meat alternate requirement for snack, but if sponsors choose to serve nuts and seeds for lunch or supper, it must be combined with another meat/meat alternate to fulfill the meal pattern requirement. For example, you can combine 1 ounce of nuts or seeds with 1 ounce of cooked lean meat, poultry or fish for a total of 2 ounces. Sponsors must use caution when serving nuts and/or seeds to young children. Children under 4 are at the highest risk of choking. It is recommended that sponsors choose alternate food items to fulfill the meat/meat alternate requirement or ground or finely chop them in prepared food (a recipe will be needed to show the minimum portion sizes were served). It is also recommended that sponsors not serve peanut butter or other nut butters such as almond butter to use only to meet the meat/meat alternate requirement for lunch or supper. It typically takes 4 tablespoons of peanut butter in a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and can be too much and difficult for children to consume. Frozen yogurt or other yogurt-flavored snack products are not considered yogurt and therefore are not creditable towards the meal pattern requirements. Homemade yogurt, frozen yogurt or other yogurt flavored products such as yogurt bars, yogurt-covered fruit and/or nuts are not creditable food items either as homemade items may present food safety dangers. Dried beans or peas may count as either a vegetable component or a meat/meat alternate component, but it may not be counted as both in the same meal.

96 Not Creditable as Meat/Meat Alternates
Imitation cheese or cheese products i.e. Velveeta is not creditable Cream cheese Tofu Drinkable yogurt, frozen yogurt bars Commercial pot pies Formulated (processed) meat products with no product specifications or CN labels Wild game and traditional foods that are disallowed by Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Some food items that are not creditable as meat/meat alternates include: Imitation cheese or cheese products such as velveeta cheese, are not creditable Cream cheese Tofu Drinkable yogurt or frozen yogurt bars Commercial pot pies Processed meat products that do not have CN labels; or Wild game and traditional foods that are disallowed by Alaska Department of Evironmental Conservation (DEC). We will go over a list of traditional foods that are allowed and disallowed by the DEC.

97 Shelf-Stable Meals Shelf-stable dried meat, poultry and seafood snacks are not creditable towards a reimbursable meal. Do not qualify for CN Labeling Program Cannot contribute to meat component Manufacturer’s Analysis sheets are not accepted Please see USDA Policy Memo TA Revised : Shelf-stable, Dried Snacks Made from Meat, Poultry, or Seafood Shelf-stable meals are increasingly common in Summer Food, especially in the rural areas of Alaska. The USDA Policy Memo TA issued in June 2011 clarified creditable/non creditable shelf-stable food items. Shelf-stable dried meat, poultry and seafood snacks do not qualify for the Child Nutrition Labeling Program, therefore they will not have CN labels attached. They cannot contribute to the meat/meat alternate component as it does not meet the meal pattern requirements and any Manufacturer’s Analysis or Product Formulation sheets will not be accepted and as a result are not creditable towards a reimbursable meal.

98 Shelf-Stable Meals Creditable
Cooked, cured meat and/or poultry sausages without byproducts Shelf-stable sticks packed in water without byproducts Breaded meat or poultry sticks Dried pepperoni for pizza toppings Not Creditable Smoked snack sticks made with beef and chicken Summer sausage Pepperoni sticks Meat, poultry or seafood jerky Meat or poultry nuggets (shelf-stable, non-breaded dried meat or poultry snack similar to jerky) Creditable Shelf-stable meals include: Cooked, cured meat and/or poultry sausages without byproducts Shelf-stable sticks packed in water without byproducts Breaded meat or poultry sticks Dried pepperoni for pizza toppings Non creditable shelf-stable meals include: Smoked snack sticks made with beef and chicken Summer sausage Pepperoni sticks Meat, poultry or seafood jerky Meat or poultry nuggets (shelf-stable, non-breaded dried meat or poultry snack similar to jerky)

99 Traditional Foods What can be used:
Fresh or Frozen Fish Fresh or Frozen game such as reindeer, caribou, beaver, whale, moose, ducks and birds The cook or other authorized person must decide if food is safe to prepare Must be labeled with name of food, date received, and source of food Traditional foods information available: Traditional wild game meat, seafood, plants and other food may be donated to a food service provided that certain conditions are met. Some traditional foods that can be used include: fresh or frozen fish, fresh or frozen game such as reindeer, caribou, beaver, whale, moose, ducks and birds. Whoever receives the donated food, whether it be the cook or another authorized person, he/she must decide whether or not the food is safe to prepare and the food must be labeled appropriately with the name, date received and source of the food. For more information on traditional foods and the Receipt of Donated Game form can be found on our Child Nutrition Programs website.

100 Traditional Foods What cannot be used: Wild mushrooms
Bivalve shellfish such as clams or mussels Fox meat & organs Bear or walrus meat Polar bear liver Fermented meat & seafood (stink eggs, fermented beaver tail, fermented flipper, etc.) Non-commercial smoked & dried fish products Here is a list of Donated Foods that is not acceptable: Wild mushrooms Bivalve shellfish such as clams or mussels Fox meat & organs Bear or walrus meat Polar bear liver Fermented meat & seafood (stink eggs, fermented beaver tail, fermented flipper, etc.) Non-commercial smoked & dried fish products

101 Fruits/Vegetables Use 100% juice
May not be served for a snack if milk or another fruit/vegetable is the only other component 2 forms of the same fruit or vegetable may not be served at a meal Applesauce and Apple Juice Minimum serving 1/8 cup of fruit/vegetable to qualify towards the component Fruits/Vegetables served as a combination item are creditable as only one serving Peas & carrots, fruit cocktail, pizza toppings When choosing to serve juice as part of the fruit/vegetable component, sponsors should be serving 100% fruit or vegetable juice. Juices should not be served to meet the fruit/vegetable requirement too many times throughout the week. It may fill up the children and take the place of foods that provide other needed nutrients. Juices also may not be served for a snack if milk is the only other component so you don’t have two beverages a snack and juice may not be served if another fruit or vegetable is served at snack as it is from the same food component. The meal pattern for snack requires two different food components to be served. Sponsors should also be aware that 2 forms of the same fruit or vegetable may not be served at a meal. For example, at lunch you may not serve applesauce and 100% apple juice to fulfill the 2 servings of fruit/vegetable component. It must be two different fruit or vegetable items. For lunch or supper, sponsors are required to serve a total of ¾ cup of the fruit/vegetable component where 2 different forms of fruit/vegetables are served. The minimum serving size to qualify towards the component is 1/8 cup. Fruits or vegetables served as a combination item are only creditable as one serving. For example, pre-packaged peas and carrots are considered as one item, fruit cocktails and pizza toppings are only counted as one serving. Sponsors must serve another fruit or vegetable to meet the 2 servings of the fruit/vegetable requirement for lunch or supper.

102 Benefits of Fruits Provides a number of nutrients such as potassium, fiber, Vitamin C, and folate Are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories Adds color, flavor and texture to meals Fruits can provide a wide range of nutrients including potassium, fiber, Vitamin C, and folate. They are naturally low in fat, sodium and calories. Fruits & Vegetables add color, flavor and texture to a meal. They can be used to add color and interest to a meal, making meals more appetizing for children.

103 Encouraging Fruits Offer a variety fruits
Select fruit canned in 100% juice or water instead of light or heavy syrup Limit juice; try not to serve juice to meet the fruit/vegetable requirement too many times throughout the week. It may fill up the children and take the place of foods that provide other needed nutrients Choose 100% juice Labels are deceiving 100% vs 100% Vitamin C Sponsors should offer a variety of fruits throughout the week to ensure children are receiving various nutrients each day. Fruit canned in 100% juice or water is ideal instead of light or heavy syrups which can add a lot of sugar. Juices should be limited to be served a couple times a week as juices can fill up the children and therefore take the place of foods that provide other necessary nutrients for the child. When selecting juices, sponsors should purchase 100% fruit juice. Sponsors should get in the habit of reading labels; they can be deceiving. Labels that say 100% Vitamin C does not necessarily mean the product is 100% juice. We will cover reading labels in the next slide.

104 % Juice on Food Labels Let’s compare Juice products. The label on the left says “100% Pure Orange Juice” whereas the label on the right “contains 10% juice.” This is the statement you should be aware of. No let’s compare the nutrition facts of the label. The label on the left contains up to 13% of your daily value for potassium, 137% DV of Vitamin C, 18% of Thiamin, with the additional nutrients of Niacin, Folate, Calcium Vitamin B6 and Magnesium whereas the label on the right contains 0% potassium. However, it does contain 100% Vitamin C and 15% Thiamin. Just because the label on the right contains 100% Vitamin C, does this make the product the most desirable? When we compare the ingredient list of the two products, the product on the left has only one ingredient, “100% pure squeezed pasteurized orange juice”. The label on the left has a giant list on ingredients and added sugars making this the less desirable product. Manufacturer’s can trick buyers. Label reading is a really good habit to start getting into if you have not already started doing it.

105 Benefits of Vegetables
Rich in key nutrients such as calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and Vitamin E Associated with a decreased risk of chronic diseases Low in calories, fat, sugar, and sodium Canned usually have more sodium & sugar Vegetables are rich in key nutrients including calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium, and Vitamin E. It is associated with decreasing the risk of chronic diseases and similar to fruits, vegetables are low in calories, fat, sugar and sodium. However, canned vegetables generally have more sodium and sugar than fresh vegetables.

106 Encouraging Vegetables
Offer a variety of vegetables, especially dark green, and orange vegetables Buy canned vegetables with no added salt Avoid frying vegetables and find new ways to prepare them Use herbs and spices instead of butter, margarine, and/or salt to add flavor In the NSLP/SBP new meal pattern, schools are moving towards offering a variety of dark green and orange vegetables, lowering the sodium content, saturated fat and trans fat of their meals. The CACFP meal pattern will eventually move to this as well. As of right now, there has not been any talk of changing the SFSP meal pattern. However, sponsors are encouraged to provide nutritious meals to children. Sponsors are encouraged to offer a variety of vegetables including dark green and orange vegetables, lower the sodium content of their meals by buying canned vegetables with no added salt if you buy canned vegetables and sponsors should encourage your cooks to try new ways in preparing food by experimenting with different herbs and spices instead of butter, margarine and/or salt to add flavor to the meals. All the these suggestions are encouraging sponsors to align their meals with the USDA Dietary Guidelines.

107 Vegetables that should be limited
Olives and Pickles High in sodium Snack = ¾ cup required – about 24 black olives Raisins High in sugar Snack = ¾ cup required There are some vegetables that sponsors should really limit serving: Olives and pickles are really high in sodium and raisins are high in sugar. For snack the meal pattern requires ¾ cup be served. That’s roughly 24 black olives and a lot of raisins which can be a lot for any one person to eat. Sponsors should try to go for more appealing and appetizing vegetables to meet this requirement.

108 Brainstorm In a small group, brainstorm a list of dark green and orange vegetables Let’s take a minute to brainstorm a list of dark green and orange vegetables. How many can you come up with? Some dark green vegetables include: broccoli, collard greens, kale, spinach, mesclun, romaine, beet greens, bok choy, dark green leafy lettuce, endive, escarole, mustard greens, swiss chard, turnip greens, watercress etc. Some orange vegetables include: carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, winter squash, acorn squash, butternut squash, hubbard squash, etc.

109 Do you know your leafy greens?
2 1 3 4 6 Do you know your leafy greens? Take a minute or so to identify the dark green vegetables shown on this slide. 1 Romaine 2 Frisee/Curly Endive 3 Mustard Greens 4 Spinach 5 Kale 6 Belgian Endive/English Chicory 7 Mesclun 8 Swiss Chard 9 Watercress A lot of the times, it is difficult even for us to identify food in it’s natural form today. As sponsors, you can provide that nutrition education to children to help them identify where their food comes from and how it grows. 9 5 7 8

110 Not Creditable as Vegetables/Fruits
Ketchup/Chili sauce, pickle relish Chips & Sticks (banana, potato) Coconut Commercial pizza or spaghetti sauce without CN label Fruit in yogurt (unless you add the fruit) Jelly, jam, and preserves Fruit-flavored drinks, ades or punches less than 50% strength Poptart fillings Popsickles (unless 100% fruit juice) There are some Vegetables/Fruits that do not meet the meal pattern requirements. This is just a brief list of non creditable food items including: Ketchup/chili sauce and pickle relish Chips and sticks such as banana or potato chips Coconuts Commercial pizza or spaghetti sauce without a CN label Fruit in the yogurt unless you add your own fruit to yogurt, then it is creditable towards meeting the meal pattern as long as it meets the minimum portion sizes Jelly, jam and preserves such as those found in peanut butter and jelly sandwiches Fruit-flavored drinks, ades or punches less than 50% strenth Poptart fillings Popsickles, unless it is 100% fruit juice. Remember to read the labels to ensure the product is 100% fruit juice.

111 Grain/Bread Important dietary sources of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants Must be whole-grain or enriched or made from whole- grain or enriched flour or meal Cereals must be whole-grain, enriched or fortified Grain-based sweet snack foods should not be served as part of a snack more than 2x/week Grains/Breads provide important dietary sources of fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Grains/Breads must be whole-grain or enriched or made from whole grain or enriched flour or meal. If it is a cereal, the product must be whole-grain, enriched or fortified. Bran and germ are credited the same as whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Grain-based sweet snack foods may be served but should be limited to be served only twice a week.

112 Creditable as Grain/Bread
Breads Biscuits, bagels, muffins, tortillas, rolls, and crackers Cooked cereal grains (i.e. rice, bulgur, oatmeal, corn grits) Ready to eat breakfast cereal (enriched) Cooked macaroni/noodle products Non-sweet snacks (i.e. hard pretzels, breadsticks, corn chips) Sweets (i.e. pastries, cookies, cakes, doughnuts, granola bars) No more than 2 times a week Some grain/bread items that are creditable towards the meal pattern include: breads Biscuits, bagels, muffins, tortillas, rolls and crackers Cooked cereal grains such as rice, bulgur, oatmeal, corn, grits Ready to eat enriched breakfast cereals Cooked macaroni or noodle products Non-sweet snacks such as hard pretzels, breadsticks, corn chips And sweets including pastries, cookies, cakes, doughnuts, granola bars Sponsors should limit to 2 sweet food items you serve throughout the week

113 Not Creditable as Grain/Bread
Potatoes or corn (vegetables) Ice Cream cones Nut or seed meals and flours Tapioca Potato chips Popcorn or caramel corn Muffins if first ingredient is not enriched grain Items made from flours that are not enriched Non-creditable grains/breads include: Potatoes or corn. This is a common misconception. Potatoes are considered a vegetable under the USDA meal patterns Ice Cream Cones Nut or seed meals and flours Tapioca Potato Chips Popcorn or caramel corn Muffins, if the first ingredient on the nutrition label is not enriched or whole-grain. Costco muffins generally have sugar as the first ingredient therefore are not creditable towards a reimbursable meal Any other grains/bread items made from flours that are not enriched or whole-grain It is a good idea to become familiar with the Grains/Breads list in the Food Buying Guide to help you determine creditable food items as the weight of each food item differs from another.

114 Entire cereal grain seed or kernel
What are Whole Grains? Whole grains consist of the entire cereal seed or kernel. The kernel has three parts as shown on the slide – the bran, the germ, and the endosperm. Usually the kernel is cracked, crushed or flaked during the milling process. If the finished product retains the same relative proportions of bran, germ and endosperm as the original grain, it is considered a whole-grain. Entire cereal grain seed or kernel

115 Here is a list of some common whole-grain items

116 Recognizing Whole Grains
The word “whole” listed before the type of grain Some grains have standard of identity Cracked wheat, crushed wheat, graham flour The term “berries” or “groats” indicate a whole, unrefined grain Rye berries or buckwheat groats Rolled oats, oatmeal, brown rice, brown rice flour, and wild rice are whole grains Some common and usual names for other whole grains include: The word “whole” listed before the type of grain, such as whole corn Words that have a standard identity that describe whole-grains as ingredients including: Cracked wheat, Crushed wheat, graham flour The words whole berries and groats are also used to designate whole grains. For example, rye berries or buckwheat groats Rolled oats and oatmeal including old-fashioned, quick-cooking, and instant oatmeal; and Other whole-grain products that do not use the word “whole” in their description such as brown rice, brown rice flour or wild rice Sponsors will need to read nutrition labels to ensure the grains/bread items they are serving is whole-grain or enriched. We will go over reading bread labels in the next slide.

117 Reading Bread Labels Whole Wheat Bread Whole Wheat Flour, Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Wheat Gluten, Yeast, Salt, Molasses, Soybean Oil, Cracked Wheat, Oats, Calcium Propionate (preservative), Sodium Stearyl, Lactylate, Mono- and Diglycerides, Wheat Bran, Whey, Soybeans, Wheat Germ, Nonfat Milk, Soy Lecithin. Wheat Bread Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Yeast, Contains 2% or less of the following: Soybean Oil, Salt, Sodium Stearoyl Lactate (non Dairy), Calcium Sulfate, Guar Gum, Calcium Propionate (a preservative), Enzyme Active Soy Flour, Monocalcium Phosphate, Datem (vegetable), Ammonium Sulfate, Enzymes (vegetable), Ascorbic Acid (dough conditioner), Azodicarbonamide, L-Cysteine. Here are 2 ingredient bread labels. There is “Whole Wheat Bread” vs. “Wheat Bread”. Which one is Whole-Grain?...Whole Wheat Flour. You can tell by reading the first ingredient as Whole Wheat Flour. Whole-grains contain the word “whole” that describes the product. Which one is creditable as a grain/bread towards the meal pattern?...Both. The meal pattern requirements for grains/breads states that it must be whole-grain or enriched breads. It is important to remember that Crushed Wheat Bread with grains sprinkled on top are not necessarily a whole grain and Brown breads are not necessarily whole grains. Just because it’s colored brown, due to added food coloring or molasses (dark sugar), does not mean it is a whole-grain product. You need to read the nutrition label to confirm the product as whole-grain.

118 Children with Special Needs – Food Disabilities
A child with a disability that restricts his/her diet must be provided food substitutions only when supported by a statement signed by a licensed physician. The medical state must identify: The child’s disability and an explanation of why the disability restricts the child’s diet The major life activity affected by the disability The food or foods to be omitted from the child’s diet and, The food or choice of foods that must be substituted A child with a food related disability that restricts his/her diet must be provided a food substitution only when supported by a statement signed by a licensed physician. Sponsoring organizations do not have the choice to provide a food substitution. You must provide the food substitution as suggested in the medical statement from the licensed physician to the child. In the medical statement, it must identify: The child’s disability and an explanation of why the disability restricts the child’s diet The major life activity affected by the disability The food or foods to be omitted from the child’s diet and, The food or choice of foods that must be substituted

119 Children with Other Special Needs – Food Allergies
An abnormal response to the body’s defense If child’s allergic condition meets the USDA’s definition of a disability, substitutions must be made to accommodate the food allergy with a medical statement from a licensed physician Children with food allergies is an abnormal response to the body’s defense. Unless the child’s food allergy condition meet’s the USDA’s definition of a disability, sponsoring organizations are required to make the food substitution to accommodate the food allergy with a medical statement on file for the child from a licensed physician. If the food allergy does not meet the definition of an allergy, then the sponsoring organization has the option to provide a food substitution to accommodate the food allergy, but is not required to, although sponsors are encouraged to accommodate the child’s special need. Again any food substitutions may only be made with a valid medical statement on file for the child from a licensed physician in order for you to claim the meal for reimbursement.

120 Children with Other Special Needs – Food Intolerances
An adverse food-induced reaction that does not involve the body’s immune system Not considered disabilities Sponsors are not required, but are encouraged, to provide food substitutions Food intolerances are a result of an adverse food-induced reaction that does not involved the body’s immune system and therefore are not considered a disability. Sponsors may choose to provide the food substitution to accommodate the food intolerance at the sponsoring organization’s expense, but are not required to. It may be an added expense to the sponsoring organization and can be costly. If any food substitutions are made, sponsors must have a medical statement on file for the child from a licensed physician. Any food substitutions that are made without a valid medical statement on file can not be claimed for reimbursement. Unsure if true, check before adding: If the parent chooses to provide a portion of the meal to accommodate the special need, the sponsoring organization may claim the meal for reimbursement as long as the meal served to the child meets the meal pattern requirements.

121 Meal Service Open, Restricted Open and Enrolled Sites
Sites may serve up to 2 meals or 1 meal and 1 snack per day in any combination except lunch and supper Camps, Alaska Native and Migrant Sites Sites may serve up to 3 meals per day in any combination of breakfast, lunch, snack, supper School Food Authorities (sponsors and vendors) May use the SFSP meal pattern or NSLP meal pattern Sponsors with open, restricted open and enrolled sites may serve up to 2 meals or 1 meal and 1 snack a day. Sponsors may choose to serve any combination of the meals except for lunch and supper for one site. Sponsors with Camps, Alaska Native and/or Migrant sites may serve up to 3 meals a day in any combination of breakfast, lunch, snack or supper. Sponsors are not required to serve all 3 meals. You may choose to serve only 1 or 2 meals; 3 meals is the maximum amount of meals any one site can claim meals for reimbursement. To keep food service operations consistent between Child Nutrition Programs, School Food Authorities, sponsors and/or vendors, participating in NSLP have the option of using the SFSP meal pattern or the NSLP/SBP meal pattern if you choose.

122 Types of Meal Service For Camps ONLY Family Style Meal Service
Requires that all components must be offered so that a child can take a full portion of each, although they are not required to do so. Cafeteria Style Meal Service Requires that a complete meal with the correct portion sizes be received by the child. Serving Family Style meals can help children develop good eating habits through the personal example provided by supervising adults. A family style meal service is ideal for camp sites if adults are available to assist children during the meal. It allows the staff to provide a stable environment for teaching good eating habits to children. Family Style meal service should not be used for other types of sites. It is required that all meal components must be placed on each table so a child is provided the minimum portions of each meal component. The child must be offered each meal component and should be encouraged to take the full portion. Cafeteria Style Meal Service requires that a complete meal with the correct portion sizes be received by the child. All the meal components are placed on trays or equivalent and each child goes through the line. The child must take the required minimum portion sizes of each meal component of the meal pattern in order for it to be a reimbursable meal.

123 Types of Meal Service Offer Versus Serve Other Types of Meal Service
Breakfast: child may decline 1 food item offered at breakfast Lunch/Supper: child may decline up to 2 of the food items offered at lunch or supper OVS is not available for snacks Other Types of Meal Service Pre-plated or pre-packaged All meals must have all the required meal components in order to claim for reimbursement. Offer Versus Serve is a meal service in SFSP that may help sponsors simplify program administration. OVS is not required, but is an option for the sponsor. If sponsors choose to use this meal option, you must enforce the following rules: At breakfast, a child must be offered 3 food items (grain/bread, fruit/vegetable, and milk) of the meal pattern and may only decline 1 item. The child must take at least 2 food items in order for the meal to be claimed for reimbursement. For example, at breakfast, the food items offered are cereal, milk and applesauce. A child may choose to eat only the cereal and milk and decline the applesauce. Sponsors may count the meal. If a child only chose to drink the milk or only take the applesauce, the meal cannot be claimed for reimbursement. At Lunch or Supper, a child must be offered 5 food items (grain/bread, 2 servings of fruit/vegetable, meat/meat alternate, and milk) and may decline up to 2 items. The child must take a minimum of 3 food items in order for the meal to be claimed for reimbursement. For example, at lunch, the food items offered are a ham/cheese sandwich, milk, orange slices and carrots with ranch. A child may choose to take the ham/cheese sandwich and orange slices only. This meal is considered a reimbursable meal and may be counted. A child may choose to take the ham/cheese sandwich, carrot sticks and orange slices, therefore declining only one item. This meal is also a reimbursable meal because the child took 4 of the 5 food items offered. However, if a child chooses to take only the ham/cheese sandwich, this is not a reimbursable meal and cannot be included in the meal count because the child only took 2 food items. OVS may be offered for breakfast, lunch or supper but is not an option for snacks, as snacks only contain two components. It is important to remember that children must be offered a complete meal meaning all the food items/components must be offered and children must not be urged to decline components. For sponsors that provide unitized meals may use OVS as an option as a long as the above rules are followed. If sponsors choose not to use OVS, sponsors may pre-plate or pre-package meals and serve to children as a unit. All meals served must have all the required meal components that follow the SFSP meal pattern in order to claim for reimbursement. Any meals that are missing meal components will be identified as incomplete meals and therefore are not reimbursable.

124 Requirements of Meal Service
In order for a meal to be reimbursable, the meals must be: Meeting the meal pattern requirements Served complete Documented using production records or equivalent Served during the State approved meal time service Consumed by the children onsite Counted at the point of service (point of service meal counts) In order for a meal to be reimbursable, the meals must: Meet the meal pattern requirements Be served/offered as a complete meal Be Documented using daily production records or cycle menus with the appropriate CN labels and recipes Be Served during the State approved meal time service. Be consumed by the children onsite. Children may not take the meals and leave the site. They must consume the meal during the meal service. Any part of the meal (except for a piece of fruit or a vegetable) that is taken off-site for consumption is considered a non reimbursable meal. If sponsors would like to allow their children to take a fruit/vegetable component of the meal pattern to be taken off-site, must contact the State agency for approval. Sponsors may only allow sites that have enough staff to monitor the sites to allow children to take the fruit/vegetable off site. There should be adequate personnel at all sites to supervise the children on the site while they are eating the meals And the meals must be counted at the point of service. It is very important for site staff to complete daily meal counts at the point of service, meaning meals are counted as they are served a complete reimbursable meal. Non-Reimbursable meals include: -Meals not served as a complete unit -Meal patterns or types not approved -Meals served at unapproved sites -Meals consumed off-site -More than one meal served to a child at a time -Claim more than 2% of the number of first meals served -Meals served outside of approved timeframes -Meals served to ineligible children -Meals that are spoiled or damaged -Meals that were not served -Meals served to adults

125 Happy, Healthy Eating Environments
How to make mealtime at your site a pleasant experience: Allow children to eat at their own pace Don’t force children to eat, encourage them Offer a variety of foods in different ways Make sure the dining room is attractive and clean Provide serving utensils that are age appropriate Have children help setup the food service and help clean up after eating Provide a quiet time before meals so children are relaxed Encourage children to talk about their food experiences Encourage a friendly atmosphere A pleasant eating environment is an important aspect of healthy eating. Bringing children and foods together in a happy meal setting is as important as what they’re eating. Pleasant eating experiences form habits and attitudes that can last a lifetime. Staff should encourage good experiences with food and eating by: allowing children to eat at their own pace, not forcing children to eat, they can be picky. Try encouraging them instead, and roll model healthy eating habits. The physical environment of the meal is important as well. Encourage a friendly atmosphere in a facility that is attractive and clean. Use bright colors and decorations to capture children’s interest, and have the children help set up the food service and help clean up after. Lastly, sponsors will want to have a healthy atmosphere. Providing a quiet time just before meals will promote relaxation during meal times. Talk to children about the foods they’re eating—color, shape, texture, taste.

126 Meal Service Times Submit meal times for each site to the State
Meals/Snacks may be served and claimed on weekends If meals are not prepared onsite, sponsors must ensure meals are delivered no more than 1 hour before the beginning of the meal service and have adequate food storage Meal time changes must be approved by the State prior to implementing Previously, federal regulations enforced time restrictions on the meal service. FNS has waived these restrictions. However, sponsors should use reasonable times for each meal service. Meal times must be submitted for each site to the State for approval in each Site Information Sheet in the CNP Web. There are no regulations restricting meal service on the weekends. Therefore, sponsors are allowed to serve meals through SFSP on the weekends with State approval. In addition, all sites must arrange for delivery of the meals if they are not prepared onsite and arrange for storing the meals properly. Sponsors must ensure meals are delivered no more than 1 hour before the beginning of the meal service. If sponsors need to make changes to their meal times, you must submit these changes to the State prior to implementing the change. Any meals served outside of the approved meal service time may not be claimed for reimbursement.

127 Daily Meal Counts Meal counts must be taken daily at the Point of Service. Monthly/Weekly consolidate meal counts (attachment 18,19, 20) Establish a double check system to verify meal counts It is extremely important for site staff to take meal counts daily at the point of service. The point of service is the point where meals are counted as they are served to ensure only complete meals are served. Sponsors must take daily meal counts and consolidate them either weekly or monthly. A double-check system must be used to verify meal counts prior to submitting it into the claim. Sample meal count forms are found in the Administrative Manual, attachments 18, 19 and 20.

128 Daily Meal Count Form This Daily Meal Count Form may be used by sponsors. Instructions for completing the Daily Meal Count form: Section 1 equals the total meals available. That number equals the number of meals received, prepared, plus the number of meals available from the previous day. Section 2 equals the total number of first meals served to children. Cross out each number as a child receives a meal. Include any teenagers, 18 and under, paid or unpaid, who are helping out at the site. (If more than 150 children are served at the site, record on back of form.) Section 3 equals the total number of second meals served to children. Remember, SFSP 2nd reimbursable meals are limited to no more than 2 percent of the total number of first meals served. Second meals are not counted by SFSP Camps or Seamless Summer Option Sites. Section 4 equals the total number of meals served to Program adults. “Program adults” are adults who work directly as part of the operation of the food service. This includes all adults who prepare meals, serve meals, clean up, or supervise the children. This does not include teenagers, 18 and under, who may perform these tasks at the site. Meals for children 18 and under are fully reimbursable, and you would count these meals in Section 2. Section 5 equals the total number of meals served to non-Program adults. “Non-Program adults” are adults who are not directly involved in the operation of the food service. Non-Program adults include any sponsor administrative staff, such as monitors or sponsor directors, or State or Federal reviewers. Section 6 equals the total number of meals served, which is the sum of Section s 2 – 5. Section 7 equals the total number of meals that are unusable because they are damaged, incomplete (SFSP), or non-reimbursable (Seamless Summer Option). Section 8 equals the total number of leftover meals, which is calculated by subtracting Sections 6 plus Section 7 from Section 1. Section 9 equals the sum of Sections 6, 7, and 8. It accounts for all meals and should equal Section 1. Use the Section 10 at the bottom of the form to record the number of children requesting a (first) meal after all available meals were served. This information is helpful in adjusting meal orders upward. The site supervisor must sign and date the meal count form.

129 Field Trip Notification Form found in packets
Field Trips in SFSP Sponsors must notify the State of all field trips that affect the time or location of the meal service. Failure to notify State may be considered “consumed off-site” for any meals served and are not reimbursable Please remember food safety when eating off-site Field Trip Notification Form found in packets Sponsors are required to notify the State agency of all field trips that affect the time and location of the meal service. In addition, sponsors are also advised to notify the food service vendor, if applicable, in advance of any trips. Sponsors may use the Field Trip Notification form to inform the State of any field trips. This form may be submitted with your application. If sponsors fail to notify the State agency, the meals served may be considered “consumed off-site” and may not be reimbursed.

130 Leftover Meals or Components
Sponsors may use the following to help minimize the amount of food waste: Monitor site reports and adjust meal preparation Limit number of second meals served as a unit Transfer extra meals from a site with too many to a site with a shortage Designate a “sharing table” Store complete meals and nonperishable components (must follow food safety) Donate excess food to homeless shelters, food pantries or other nonprofit organizations All sponsors must plan, prepare, or order meals with the objective of providing one meal per child at each meal service, and must ensure that entire meals and food components are not often left over and unusable. Sponsors should minimize the amount of waste and unusable leftovers. The following are some ideas to help limit waste: Sponsors should monitor site reports and make appropriate adjustments on the number of attending children and the number of delivered meals to reduce waste and cost A limited number of second meals served as a unit can be claimed for reimbursement, as long as the total number of second meals does not exceed 2% of the first meals served by the sponsor, for all sites, during the claiming period. Extra meals can be transferred, if allowed by the local health code, from a site with too many meals to a site with a shortage, keeping in mind that meals in excess of the receiving site’s approved meal level are not reimbursable. Sponsors may designate a “sharing table” where children may return whole items that they choose not to eat. These items are made available to other children who may want additional helpings. Sponsors may serve meal components so that they can be easily “recycled.” For example, if sandwich halves are wrapped separately, a child can return an uneaten half to the sharing table. Sponsors will need to check with your local health department on “sharing tables.” If sponsors have the equipment available, you may store complete meals and nonperishable components that are left from the sharing table back into the refrigerator for the next meal service. And when appropriate, sponsors may choose to donate excess meals to homeless shelters, food pantries or other nonprofit organizations.

131 Menu Planning Five basic menu planning principles…
Include all food components Strive for high nutritional content Emphasize variety Think about color Consider eye appeal Planning menus means thinking about what foods to serve together. A healthful diet offers a variety of foods, is low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and moderate in total fat, salt and sugar. Moderation means offering foods with caution as to the number of times used. The more variety of foods that are offered the better, as a wide variety of foods offered to children provides various vitamins and nutrients. Meals should also offer a variety of textures, tastes and color. Your menus should look very eye appealing to the children. This can help increase the participation rate during your meal service.

132 Cycle Menus Vs Production Records
All sponsors must maintain daily production records or use cycle menus to document meals that meet the meal pattern requirements. Sponsors must be able to justify the claims for reimbursement to ensure that the meals served meet the SFSP requirements. Sponsors have two options to document the meals served by either using cycle menus or daily production records. Cycle menu/production records will be verified at the time of review.

133 Cycle Menus Set of planned menus repeated in the same order for a period of time, 3-6 weeks is typical. Keep original on file Post a working copy & save Substitutions must be listed on working cycle menus Combination foods must have recipe on file with yields Cycle menus are a set of planned menus that are repeated in the same order for a period of time. A cycle menu offers variety and allows for substitutions to be made. Sponsors that choose to use cycle menus must keep the original cycle menu on file and post a working copy for the cooks to use. On the working menu, any substitutions that are made must be listed in place of the food item that was originally planned. The working copy must be saved and kept on file. For combination foods that are made from scratch, a recipe must be kept on file to document how food item meets the meal pattern requirements. For any processed food item prepared and served to the children, a CN label or manufacturer’s analysis must be kept on file to document how each ingredient contributes towards the meal pattern.

134 Cycle Menus Evaluate your Cycle Menu
Will the foods on the menu appeal to the children and look good? Do your menus repeat any of the foods you have selected for other meals on that day? Do they encourage children to eat a variety of foods? Do they meet SFSP requirements? Do they promote a healthy lifestyle? Is it within your food budget? Good menu planning for summertime involves several food service considerations. It is important to evaluate your menu to ensure you’re serving healthy, well-balanced and practical meals.

135 Combination Foods Foods that have more than one ingredient are considered combination foods. May be commercially made or homemade. Commercial – need CN label or Manufacturer’s Analysis Homemade – need recipe For lunch or supper: Combination foods should only have 2 components that will be claimed Only 1 vegetable/fruit component can be represented Additional food items in the combination food will count as “extras” Foods that have more than one ingredient are considered combination foods. They may either be commercially made or homemade. For commercial made combination food items, you need to have a CN label. For a homemade combination food item, a recipe needs to be on file to document the contributions of each ingredient towards the meal pattern. Sponsors must ensure that the recipe reflects that the components per serving size are adequate. It is recommended that for lunch or supper, combination food items that are served to children should only have 2 meal components that will be claimed and only 1 serving of the fruit/vegetable components can be represented. If a child chooses not to eat the combination food item, he/she will only be missing out on 2 meal components. Any additional food items in the combination food will count as “extras.” In Offer Versus Serve, a child may only decline 2 food items offered, therefore if the combination food item is declined, he/she must take the rest of the food items in order for the meal to be claimed for reimbursement.

136 Child Nutrition (CN) Labels
Provides information on how a product contributes to the meal pattern requirements If you purchase a product that does not have a CN label, you must obtain the Product Formulation Sheet (Manufacturer’s Analysis) Child Nutrition (CN) Labeling Program CN Labels clearly identifies the contribution of a product toward the meal pattern requirements. Sponsors are not required to purchase products with CN labels, but are encouraged to do so. CN Labels should be collected for either: Main dish products which contribute a minimum of 0.5 ounces equivalent meat/meat alternate toward the meal pattern requirements. For example, beef patties, cheese or meat pizzas, meat or cheese and bean burritos, egg rolls, and breaded fish portions Juice drink and juice drink products which contain at least 50% full-strength juice by volume including grape drink, fruit punch and juice bars.

137 How to identify a CN label?
A CN label will always contain the following: The CN logo, with a distinct border The meal pattern contribution statement A 6-digit product identification number USDA/FNS Authorization The month and year of approval CN 000000 This 3.00 oz serving of raw beef patty provides when cooked 2.00 oz equivalent meat for Child Nutrition Meal Pattern Requirements. (Use of this logo and statement Authorized by the Food and Nutrition Service, USDA ) CN CN CN Sponsors should be aware of false Child Nutrition Labels. To identify a true CN Label, it must have the following: The CN logo with a distinct border as shown The meal pattern contribution statement. For this particular item, 3.00 oz of raw beef patty provides 2.00 oz meat when cooked. For lunch or supper, A unique 6-digit identification number that has been assigned by Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) found in the upper right hand corner of the CN logo The USDA/FNS authorization statement; and the month and year of approval in parenthesis at the end of the statement

138 Food Buying Guide An essential manual to help determine quantities of food to purchase for use when preparing meals for children. Food Buying Guide Manual: de.html Food Buying Guide Calculator: The Food Buying Guide is an important resource tool for your organization. It helps determine quantities of food to purchase for use when preparing meals for children. It will also explain food yields, recipe analysis’, production records, and so much more. It can be downloaded online at the link provided. There is also the Food Buying Guide Calculator that is helpful for adjusting your standardized recipes to fit the number of children you are trying to prepare for.

139 Standardized Recipes A standardized recipe is one that has been tried, adapted, and retried several times for use by a given food service operation and has been found to produce the same good results and yield every time when the exact procedures are used with the same type of equipment and the same quantity and quality of ingredients. Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes USDA Recipes for Schools: USDA Recipes for Child Care: A standardized recipes help ensure that the correct portion size is served to all students. It’s a recipe that has been tried, adapted and retried several times and has been found to produce the same good results and yield every time when the exact procedures are used with the same type of equipment and the same quantity and quality of ingredients. A sample of a standardized recipe can be found in 2012 SFSP Nutrition Guidance for Sponsors Manual page 116. Additional information can be found in Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes or you can find more standardized recipes from USDA for schools or child care at the links provided.

140 Analyzing Recipes Use Recipe Analysis Worksheet – Appendix A of the Food Buying Guide Document the contributions of ingredients in the recipes to ensure it meets the meal pattern requirements Sponsors should analyze the recipes to determine the contributions of the ingredients towards each of the meal components of the meal pattern. State agencies will use the same procedure to determine if the meals you are serving are meeting the meal pattern requirements. I have provided a Recipe Analysis Worksheet in your packets. A similar template can also be found in Appendix A of the Food Buying Guide.

141 Recipe Analysis Instructions
List all ingredients and the amount of each ingredient Use the Food Buying Guide. Record the yields (meat/meat alternate in ounces, fruit/vegetable in ¾ cup servings and grains/bread in 1 slice bread or equivalent) Determine the number of 2 ounce meat/meat alternate servings by dividing the total by 2 Round the total for fruit/vegetables and grain/bread down to the nearest whole number to find the number of servings When analyzing your recipes, you will want to: List all the ingredients you are using and the amount of each ingredient Use the Food Buying Guide as a reference to record the yields of each meal component. For example, record the meat/meat alternate in ounces, fruit/vegetable in ¾ cup servings and grains/bread in 1 slice bread or equivalent servings). This will help you determine how much of each meal component can contribute to the meal pattern. Using the calculation portion of the worksheet, you will need to determine the number of 2 ounce meat/meat alternate servings by dividing the total by 2 Finally, round the total for fruit/vegetables and grain/bread down to the nearest whole number to find the number of servings for each meal component. We can take a look at an example on the next slide.

142 Recipe Calculation for Claiming Beef & Spaghetti Casserole
Ingredients that are being claimed Amount Meat/Meat Alternate (2 oz) Fruit/Vegetable (3/4 cup) Bread/Bread Alternate (1 slice bread or equivalent) Raw ground beef (no more than 25% fat) 3 lbs. 4 oz. 1 lbs.= oz servings (from FBG) 3.25*11.5= 37.37 servings Cooked macaroni noodles or spaghetti 1 qt. 2 ¼ cup = 6 ¼ cups ½ cup = 1 serving or 1 slice of bread (from FBG) 6.25/0.5= 12.5 servings Canned tomato paste 1 lb. 2 oz. = 18 oz 16 oz = 27.6 servings (from FBG) 16/27.6 = servings/oz 18/0.578= 31 servings 1 Tbsp = ¼ cup servings Total 37.37 oz. 31 Calculations 37.37/2 = 18 Number of Servings oz. servings 31 – ¼ cup servings (not claiming) 12 - ½ cup servings (equal to 1 slice) A sponsor is serving a Beef & Spaghetti Casserole for lunch, we can use this Recipe Analysis Worksheet to determine the contributions of each ingredient towards a reimbursable meal. First you want to list out the ingredients. This recipe calls for raw ground beef, cooked macaroni noodles or spaghetti, and canned tomato paste. These are the ingredients the sponsor is trying credit towards the meal pattern. Second you want to write down the amount of each ingredient. This recipe calls for 3 pounds and 4 ounces of raw ground beef, 1 quart and 2 ¼ cups of cooked macaroni or spaghetti, and 1 pound and 2 ounces or 18 ounces of canned tomato paste. For raw ground beef look up the amount of servings per purchase unit in the Food Buying Guide. It gives 1 pound of raw ground beef 25% or less provides 11.5 – 1 ounce servings. Therefore, 3.25 lbs of raw ground beef divided by 11.5 (1 ounce servings) gives us servings. Use the calculation box at the bottom to determine the amount of servings of 2 ounces of raw ground beef. Divide 2 by and you should get about 18 servings (round down) to meet the meat/meat alternate meal pattern requirement. For cooked macaroni noodles or spaghetti, look at the Grains/Breads Worksheet found in the Food Buying Guide. Under Group H, 1 serving of macaroni noodles or spaghetti noodles is equivalent to ½ cup cooked noodles. Using conversion factors, 1 quart equals 4 cups, therefore, 6.25 cups of cooked macaroni noodles divided by 0.5 equals 12.5 servings. Again, ½ cup servings is equivalent to 1 slice of bread. You would get only 12 servings of grains/bread to meat that requirement of the meal pattern. For canned tomato paste, look at tomato paste to find the amount of servings in 1 pound in the Food Buying Guide. 1 pound or 16 ounces of canned tomato paste gives 27.6 servings. To get the amount of servings per ounce divide 27.6 by 16 to get servings per ounce. Therefore 18 ounces of the canned tomato paste used in the recipe divided by gives 31 servings. In the Food Buying Guide, it says that 1 tablespoon of tomato paste is equivalent to ¼ cup of vegetable so we have 31 – ¼ cup servings of vegetable. You’ll need to add another fruit/vegetable to get the required ¾ cup of fruit/vegetable for the lunch meal pattern. You may need to make adjustments to your recipe depending on the number of children you need to serve. The max amount of children we can serve for this particular recipe is 12 children (due to the 12 servings of grains/bread meal component). You may adjust your menus as well to make sure you meet requirements of each meal component for the meal pattern. 142

143 Production Records Minimum documentation of meals meeting the meal pattern Date Estimated number to be served Actual number served Menu items Portion size Quantity prepared Amount leftover Production records can vary in format, but all production records provides staff information on what foods and recipes to use and what portion sizes to serve. It also allows staff to record the quantities prepared and the numbers served. The minimum documentation for production records include: The date Estimated number to be served The actual number served The menu items used The portion sizes of each menu item served How much was prepared; and Any meals leftover all should be documented on the daily production records.

144 Production Record Instructions
Enter the calendar date showing month, day and year. Enter all menu items served on this date for the appropriate meal service Enter the name of each food used to meet meal or snack requirements. For a menu item like beef pot pie, the foods that meet the meal requirements at lunch or supper could be: beef cubes would meet the meat/meat alternate requirement; potatoes and carrots in the pie would meet part of the fruit/vegetable requirement; the pie crust would meet part or all of the grain/bread requirement. Enter quantity of each ingredient or food item used to meet the meal requirements. Use weights, measures or number, (e.g., stew beef, 10 lbs; potatoes, 3 lbs; etc.). Enter the portion or serving size of each menu item served (e.g., 5 oz. pie, ½ cup juice). Serving sizes can be shown in measures (such as cup measures, scoop size, ladle size), weight, or number (such as medium apple). Enter the child participants served at each meal/snack. Enter the number of program adults served at each meal/snack (if applicable). Enter the number of leftovers on the production record. Tracking of leftovers is important. Staff can also indicate whether leftovers are to be frozen for later use or incorporate into the menu in the next few days. A production record template is provided in your packets. You will need to enter the calendar date showing the month, day and year Enter all menu items served on this date for the appropriate meal service i.e. breakfast, lunch, supper or snack Enter the name of each food used to meet the meal or snack requirements. For example, for beef pot pie, the foods that meet the meal requirements at lunch or supper could be: beef cubes for the meat/meat alternate component requirement and the potatoes and carrots in the pie would meet part of the fruit/vegetable component requirement. The pie crust could meet part or all of the grain/bread component requirement. However, remember in combination food items, it is recommended that only 2 items are credited. Enter the quantity of each ingredient or food item used to meet the meal pattern requirements. You will want to use weights, measures or the numbers found on the cans/cartons/boxes of the food. For example, for the beef stew, you can weigh out 10lbs if that is what the recipe calls for or 3lbs for the potatoes. Enter the portion or serving size of each menu item served. For example, 5 oz of the beef stew needs to be served to each child or ½ cup of juice. Serving sizes can be shown in measures such as a cup, scoop size, ladle size, weight or number. Enter the number of child participants served at each meal/snack Enter the number of program adults served at each meal/snack, if applicable. Enter the number of leftovers, if any, on the production record. Sponsors should be tracking leftovers as it can indicate whether leftovers should be frozen for later use or should be incorporated into the menu over the next couple days.

145 Daily Menu Production Worksheet
Production Records Daily Menu Production Worksheet Date (1): March 1, Sponsor: Summer Sun Club Meal Pattern Menu (2) Food Item Used (3) Quantity Used (4) Serving Size (5) C P (6) P A (7) Left-overs (8) Breakfast Milk, Fluid Juice or Fruit or Vegetable Grain/Bread Nonfat Milk Orange Smiles Oatmeal Nonfat Milk (gal) Large navel oranges Quaker Oats Oatmeal 1 gallon 10 oranges 6 cups 8 fl. oz. ½ cup 8 2 8 serv. 5 oran 2 serv AM Snack (Select 2) Meat/Meat Alternate Lunch Nonfat Choc. Milk Apple Baby Carrots Ham/Cheese Sandwiches Nonfat Choc. Milk (12oz carton) Medium sized bag of apples Baby Carrots (1/4C prepacked bags) Whole Wheat Bread Ham and Cheddar Cheese (1oz each) 10 cartons 10 apples 10 bags 20 slices 20 oz ¾ cup total 1 slice 2 oz. 9 1 None PM Snack Ants on a Log 100% Grape Juice Celery Sticks ( ¼ cup = 3 sticks) 100% Grape Juice (4 fl. oz. cartons) Peanut Butter (2T = 1oz) 1 lb. 32 oz jar ¼ cup 4 fl. oz. 2 Tbsp 7 8 serv 2 cart. 24 oz. Supper Additional Comments: Here is an example of a complete production record for a camp serving breakfast, lunch and snack. The date and sponsor name is included. The menu items are listed in section 2. The specific food items and the quantity used of each food item is listed in section 3 and 4. The serving size needed for each food item to meet the meal pattern requirement is listed, telling the staff exactly how much of each ingredient they need to be serving to the children to meet the minimum portion sizes of the meal pattern. The number of child participants and adult participants are listed and any leftovers are listed to let staff know what food items are available to reuse if necessary.

146 More Resources Check out the USDA Team Nutrition website for many nutrition and menu planning resources… USDA MyPlate National Food Service Management Institute USDA Recipes Menu Planners And much more…

147 Included in SFSP Packet
Application Packet & Checklist (in yellow) Appeal Procedures Advance Payment Options Vended Meal Agreements Agreement between Sponsors and Schools to Furnish Food Waiver for Unitized Meals Site Definitions & Eligibility Documentation Alaska 50% or Greater School Data 2013 SFSP Reimbursement Rates Allowable Expenses Worksheet Meal Pattern Daily Production Record Daily Meal Count Medical Statement Field Trip Notification Form First Week Site Visit Fourth Week Site Review Ethnic/Racial Data Form 2013 SFSP Manuals (Administrative Guidance, Nutrition Guidance, Site Monitors, Site Supervisors)

148 For more information, contact:
Veronica Lietz Acting Program Specialist (907) Or Debbie Soto Education Program Assistant (907)


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