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Chapter 5 Statehood and Settlement. Lesson 1 Becoming a State.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 5 Statehood and Settlement. Lesson 1 Becoming a State."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 5 Statehood and Settlement

2 Lesson 1 Becoming a State

3 Mississippi Territory In 1798, the U.S. Congress created the Mississippi Territory. It included the land in Mississippi and Alabama today. Many new settlers came after wars in the 1800s. They took land from the Native Americans. In 1798, the U.S. Congress created the Mississippi Territory. It included the land in Mississippi and Alabama today. Many new settlers came after wars in the 1800s. They took land from the Native Americans.

4 Squatter A squatter is a person who settles on land without any right to do so. People hoped this would allow them to own the land when it went up for sale. A squatter is a person who settles on land without any right to do so. People hoped this would allow them to own the land when it went up for sale.

5 Land Speculators A land speculator is a person who buys land very cheaply and then sells it for a higher price. A land speculator is a person who buys land very cheaply and then sells it for a higher price. Land speculators outside of their office

6 Steps to Statehood The land that is Alabama was part of the Mississippi Territory. The land that is Alabama was part of the Mississippi Territory. Mississippi became their own state and the land that is Alabama today became the Alabama territory. Mississippi became their own state and the land that is Alabama today became the Alabama territory. William Wyatt Bibb became governor of the Alabama Territory. William Wyatt Bibb became governor of the Alabama Territory. A legislature was formed in the AL territory. They met in 1818 and discussed the steps Alabama could take to become a state since there were already 60,000 people living in the territory. A legislature was formed in the AL territory. They met in 1818 and discussed the steps Alabama could take to become a state since there were already 60,000 people living in the territory.

7 Steps to Statehood After having 60,000 people, the legislature sent a petition, or request to Congress. After having 60,000 people, the legislature sent a petition, or request to Congress. Congress approved our petition and passed an enabling act that enabled Alabama to become a state. Congress approved our petition and passed an enabling act that enabled Alabama to become a state. This enabling act required the Alabama Territory to hold a constitutional convention. This enabling act required the Alabama Territory to hold a constitutional convention. Delegates met at the convention and wrote a constitution. Delegates met at the convention and wrote a constitution. We also had to survey and map out Alabamas land. We also had to survey and map out Alabamas land. President Monroe signed the papers and we became a state on December 14, President Monroe signed the papers and we became a state on December 14, 1819.

8 Steps to Statehood The Alabama Territory governor William Wyatt Bibb becomes the first governor of Alabama. He died and his brother Thomas Bibb became governor. The Alabama Territory governor William Wyatt Bibb becomes the first governor of Alabama. He died and his brother Thomas Bibb became governor. The first capital was Huntsville, then Cahaba, Tuscaloosa, and finally Montgomery. The first capital was Huntsville, then Cahaba, Tuscaloosa, and finally Montgomery. etId=2687F EDA-98FC- 5C9545D1F567&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=2687F EDA-98FC- 5C9545D1F567&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=2687F EDA-98FC- 5C9545D1F567&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=2687F EDA-98FC- 5C9545D1F567&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US Alabama Experience: From Territory to State

9 Lesson 2 Life in Alabama

10 Why Alabama? Settlers chose Alabama because of the warm climate, rich soil, and long growing season. Settlers chose Alabama because of the warm climate, rich soil, and long growing season. Most settlers did not have much money and wanted cheap land to grow food. Many wanted to make money by growing cotton. Many people moved by rivers and to the Black Belt. Most settlers did not have much money and wanted cheap land to grow food. Many wanted to make money by growing cotton. Many people moved by rivers and to the Black Belt.

11 Native American Removal As settlers moved to Alabama, they continued to take land away from the Native Americans. As settlers moved to Alabama, they continued to take land away from the Native Americans. Many Native Americans fought back. Many Native Americans fought back. A Creek leader, William McIntosh, sold Creek lands west of the Mississippi River so he wouldnt have to fight. McIntosh broke a Creek law and he was killed. A Creek leader, William McIntosh, sold Creek lands west of the Mississippi River so he wouldnt have to fight. McIntosh broke a Creek law and he was killed. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 forced all Native Americans east of the Mississippi River to move west to Indian Territory. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 forced all Native Americans east of the Mississippi River to move west to Indian Territory. The forced westward movement of the Cherokee became known as the Trail of Tears. Many Native Americans died of hunger, disease, and exhaustion. The forced westward movement of the Cherokee became known as the Trail of Tears. Many Native Americans died of hunger, disease, and exhaustion. 8A0E-C4D90B8B35D4&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US Indian Removal Act

12 Native American Removal

13 Early Alabamians Lives Families cleared the land, built cabins, and planted corn. Families cleared the land, built cabins, and planted corn. Most families lived far from neighbors. Most families lived far from neighbors. House raisings were held so that everyone could help each other out and get to know each other. House raisings were held so that everyone could help each other out and get to know each other. Many settlers enjoyed dancing, singing, and storytelling. Many settlers enjoyed dancing, singing, and storytelling. Most children were educated at home. Most children were educated at home. Alabama had two academies, or schools above the elementary level. Alabama had two academies, or schools above the elementary level.

14 Lesson 3 Alabamas Economy Grows

15 A Growing Economy An economy is a system for managing, producing, and delivering goods and services. Rich soil, rivers, and other resources helped our economy grow. An economy is a system for managing, producing, and delivering goods and services. Rich soil, rivers, and other resources helped our economy grow. Alabamas main crops were corn and cotton. Alabamas main crops were corn and cotton.

16 Staple A staple is a food product that is used and needed all the time. A staple is a food product that is used and needed all the time. Corn is an example of a staple. Corn is an example of a staple. etId=84CAD5C E9-A2A B8D98AA&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=84CAD5C E9-A2A B8D98AA&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=84CAD5C E9-A2A B8D98AA&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=84CAD5C E9-A2A B8D98AA&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US United Streaming-Corn

17 Cash Crop A cash crop is a crop grown to be sold rather than used by the people who grow it. A cash crop is a crop grown to be sold rather than used by the people who grow it. Cotton was a cash crop. Cotton was a cash crop. etId=9BABF9EF F95-941A- 082D775361D0&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=9BABF9EF F95-941A- 082D775361D0&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=9BABF9EF F95-941A- 082D775361D0&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=9BABF9EF F95-941A- 082D775361D0&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US United Streaming-Growing Cotton

18 Cotton Gin Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin that separates the cotton from its seeds. It cleaned cotton faster than by hand. Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin that separates the cotton from its seeds. It cleaned cotton faster than by hand. This allowed cotton growers to produce more cotton and increased the need for slaves. This allowed cotton growers to produce more cotton and increased the need for slaves. Abram Mordecai built the first cotton gin in Alabama and Daniel Pratt built the first cotton gin factory in Alabama. Abram Mordecai built the first cotton gin in Alabama and Daniel Pratt built the first cotton gin factory in Alabama A-AD8B- 1834C1794FA2&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US A-AD8B- 1834C1794FA2&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US United Streaming- The Cotton Gin

19 Cotton Many people hoped to become wealthy by growing cotton. Many people hoped to become wealthy by growing cotton. Communities, like Huntsville, built around cotton production grew quickly. Communities, like Huntsville, built around cotton production grew quickly.

20 Yeoman Farmers Yeoman farmers farmed small plots of land that they worked on their own. They lived in log homes and planted corn, raised animals, and planted cotton to sell. Yeoman farmers farmed small plots of land that they worked on their own. They lived in log homes and planted corn, raised animals, and planted cotton to sell.

21 Plantations A plantation was a large farm on which a single crop is grown. Many plantations were in the Black Belt. Plantation owners produced thousands of bales of cotton for a profit, or money left over after expenses are paid. A plantation was a large farm on which a single crop is grown. Many plantations were in the Black Belt. Plantation owners produced thousands of bales of cotton for a profit, or money left over after expenses are paid.

22 Slavery Cotton plantations depended on slavery. Cotton plantations depended on slavery. Slaves worked long hours with little rest. Slaves worked long hours with little rest. Slaves were punished harshly if they didnt work enough or for disobeying orders. Slaves were punished harshly if they didnt work enough or for disobeying orders. Alabama passed codes, or laws and rules, for slavery. It defined slaves as property and gave them limited rights. Alabama passed codes, or laws and rules, for slavery. It defined slaves as property and gave them limited rights. Slave families were often separated. Slave families were often separated. Religion, singing, dancing, stories, and crafts were important to slaves. Religion, singing, dancing, stories, and crafts were important to slaves.

23 Slavery etId=CDD6B2D3-D173-4D1C-8EB9- D323E859BEAD&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=CDD6B2D3-D173-4D1C-8EB9- D323E859BEAD&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=CDD6B2D3-D173-4D1C-8EB9- D323E859BEAD&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US etId=CDD6B2D3-D173-4D1C-8EB9- D323E859BEAD&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US United Streaming- The Layout of Slave Plantations

24 New Transportation Plantation owners needed better ways to move their cotton. Plantation owners needed better ways to move their cotton. Steamboats started to travel up Alabama rivers. Steamboats started to travel up Alabama rivers. Railroads helped to transport goods without rivers. Railroads helped to transport goods without rivers. Stagecoaches offered another way to travel by land. A system of roads were built for the stagecoaches. Stagecoaches offered another way to travel by land. A system of roads were built for the stagecoaches.

25 New Transportation


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