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Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Taking Charge: Building Self-Confidence Chapter 2: Safe and Smart Physical Activity.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Taking Charge: Building Self-Confidence Chapter 2: Safe and Smart Physical Activity."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Taking Charge: Building Self-Confidence Chapter 2: Safe and Smart Physical Activity

2 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Lesson Objectives: List and describe some activity-related physical injuries. List some guidelines for preventing injuries during physical activity. Explain how to apply the RICE formula to the treatment of physical injuries. Identify different types of risky exercises.

3 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question Injuries can occur while playing sports or because you attempt to do too much activity. What are some common types of injuries?

4 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Some common types of injuries are chronic injuries, which result from overuse or over-training; examples include –shinsplints, –stress fractures, –tennis elbow, and –rotator cuff (shoulder) injuries.

5 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer (continued) acute injuries, which result from an accident that occurs while participating; examples include –spraining an ankle, –straining a muscle, and –breaking a bone.

6 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer (continued) Another kind of injury is called microtrauma. It is a small but unseen and unfelt injury, caused by risky exercises, caused by wear and tear over time, and the cause of muscle or joint injuries later in life.

7 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What is the difference between a strain and a sprain?

8 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Sprains are injuries to ligaments (sprained ankle, for example). Strains are injuries to muscles and tendons (strained hamstring muscle, for example).

9 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What is the difference between a sign and a symptom of an injury?

10 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Signs are things the injured person or others can see: –bruising –swelling –bleeding Symptoms are felt by the injured person: –soreness –sharp pain

11 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question Injuries from physical activity occur most often to skin, bones, ligaments, and tendons. What is the difference between ligaments and tendons?

12 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Ligaments are tissues that connect bones together. For example, knee ligaments connect the bones of the upper and lower leg (femur to the tibia and fibula) (see picture).

13 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer (continued) Tendons are tissues that connect muscles to bone. For example one tendon connects the muscle of the upper leg to the kneecap (see previous picture).

14 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question When an injury happens, it needs to be treated. For injuries such as sprains and strains, what should be done immediately following an injury?

15 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer The RICE principle should be followed: Rest Ice Compression Elevation

16 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question Some people may become injured as a result of doing certain risky or harmful exercises. Can you name some of the types of movements that are risky (name movements, specific exercises will be discussed later)?

17 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Some risky exercises that involve unnatural movements are hyperflexion (too much flexion), hyperextension (too much extension), joint twisting, compression, friction, and improper strengthening exercises.

18 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What are some examples of risky hyperflexion exercises?

19 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Some risky hyperflexion exercises are duckwalks (knee hyperflexion), bicycles (neck hyperflexion), yoga ploughs (neck hyperflexion), and deep knee bends (knee hyper- flexion).

20 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What are some examples of risky hyperextension exercises?

21 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Some risky hyperextension exercises are weightlifting with back arched, cobra and rocking horse, back bends (picture below) or wrestlers bridge, and neck circles to the rear (picture to the right).

22 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What are some examples of risky exercises that involve twisting, compression, or friction?

23 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Some risky exercises that involve twisting, compression, or friction are hurdle sits, double-leg lifts, standing toe touches or windmills, arm circling palms down, and heroes (see picture).

24 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What are some examples of improper strengthening or stretching exercises?

25 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Some improper strengthening or stretching exercises include forward arm circles, straight-leg sit-ups, and double-leg lifts (see picture).

26 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What is meant by the term muscle balance and why is muscle balancing an important concept in a discussion of injuries?

27 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Muscle balance refers to having good fitness of muscle on each side of a joint (flexors and extensors). If muscles on one side are too strong injuries can occur. For example, if the extensors of the knee (the quadriceps) are too strong injury could occur in the flexors (hamstrings).

28 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What are some of the things you can do to help prevent injury from physical activity?

29 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Some of the things you can do to help prevent injury from physical activity are ensure a balanced training program, ensure that the exercise environment is safe (good equipment), participate in an adequate warm-up and cool- down, and use good exercise technique and avoid dangerous exercises.

30 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Question What does the word moderation mean in the context of physical activity participation?

31 Lesson 2.2: Physical Activity and Injury Answer Moderation means not doing too much exercise too soon, listening to your body, and if you hurt, stop exercising.

32 Taking Charge: Building Self-Confidence Read about Richard and Tony in the Taking Charge section of chapter 2 (page 37). Self-confidence is having faith that you can be successful in some activity. If you think you will succeed in the activity, you have a higher level of self-confidence than if you are unsure about how well you will do. You are more likely to participate in an activity if your self- confidence level is high.

33 Taking Charge: Building Self-Confidence People who lack self-confidence may avoid trying new activities or experiences, or they may prematurely quit an activity. What are some reasons people lack self-confidence? How can they increase their confidence levels? What advice would you have for Richard and Tony? Fill out the questionnaire for this chapter to see how self- confident you are about taking part in physical activities.


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