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Lesson 6.1: Activities for a LifetimeChoices From the Pyramid Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Chapter 6: Lifestyle Physical Activity and Positive Attitudes.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson 6.1: Activities for a LifetimeChoices From the Pyramid Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Chapter 6: Lifestyle Physical Activity and Positive Attitudes."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson 6.1: Activities for a LifetimeChoices From the Pyramid Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Chapter 6: Lifestyle Physical Activity and Positive Attitudes

2 Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid Lesson Objectives: Describe various types of lifestyle physical activities. Describe the FIT formula for lifestyle physical activities.

3 Question What are examples of lifestyle physical activities that can be done at home? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

4 Answer Houseworkvacuuming, cleaning Yard workraking the leaves, mowing the lawn, or shoveling snow Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

5 Question What are examples of lifestyle physical activities that can be done at work? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

6 Answer Occupations such as carpentry or bricklaying are physically active. Walking and climbing the stairs (rather than taking an elevator). Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

7 Question Can some sporting events be classified as lifetime physical activities? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

8 Answer Yes – sports like golf, tennis, and racquetball can be termed lifestyle activities. The sports can be started when young. They can be continued for life. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

9 Question What is important about the intensity of lifestyle physical activities? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

10 Answer People can select the exercise intensity. Higher levels of intensity –will lead to greater improvements in fitness. –will use a greater number of calories. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

11 Question What does the word MET refer to? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

12 Answer The word MET comes from the word metabolism. The word metabolism refers to the use of energy to sustain life. One MET refers to how much energy you use while resting. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

13 Question Lifestyle physical activities require more energy than is needed when you are just resting. How many METs do you use when doing lifestyle physical activities and vigorous physical activities? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

14 Answer Lifestyle activities usually involve a caloric expenditure around 4-7 times the resting metabolic rate. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

15 Answer (continued)

16 Question How many METs do you use when doing vigorous physical activities? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

17 Answer Vigorous activities involve a lot higher caloric expenditure, around times the metabolic rate. This is an intensity of METs. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

18 Question Where are lifestyle physical activities placed on the Physical Activity Pyramid? Why? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

19 Answer Lifestyle activities are placed at the base of the Pyramid because they are important for health, and anybody can do them on a daily basis.

20 Question How much lifestyle physical activity is recommended? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

21 Answer All teens should do 30 minutes of moderate physical activity (4-7 METs) on most days of the week. Doing more than 30 minutes of moderate activity each day is even better. It is best to get your 30 minutes in bouts or activity sessions lasting at least 10 minutes in length. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

22 Question How many calories should you expend each day and each week? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

23 Answer At a minimum (threshold), you should expend at least 200 calories a day in physical activity. This would amount to 1,000 to 1,400 calories each week based on 5 to 7 active days a week. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

24 Question What are pedometers? What lifestyle physical activity are they connected with? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

25 Answer Pedometers count the number of steps people take. They are used to monitor how much walking a person does over the course of a day. They can count running also but are more accurate for walking. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

26 Question How could you use pedometers as a motivational tool to increase your physical activity levels? Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

27 Answer You can first see how many steps you take on a normal day. A personal goal of steps to achieve can be written down. Observing the step counts during the day (and walking more if you are not on target) can help you achieve your walking goal. Lesson 6.1: Activities for a Lifetime Choices From the Pyramid

28 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Question For whom is the walking test best suited?

29 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Answer Less fit people. It can be done at a low intensity. The walking test gives you an alternative to the one-mile run, the PACER, and the step test.

30 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Question If you are active, is the walking test best for you?

31 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Answer The one-mile run or PACER may be best for estimating your cardiovascular fitness for active and fit people, but the walking test is also a good test.

32 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Question Do you need a warm-up for the walking test?

33 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Answer Because you are walking, a warm- up is not necessary. The walk itself is a warm-up.

34 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Question How do you perform the walking test?

35 Self-Assessment 6: Walking Test Answer Walk a mile at a fast pace (as fast as you can while keeping approximately the same pace for the entire walk). Immediately after the walk, count your heart rate for 15 seconds. Calculate your one-minute heart rate by multiplying by 4. Record your rate on your record sheet. Locate your walking test rating using the appropriate chart and record your rating.


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