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Mn/DOT Noise Policy for Type I Federal-aid Projects as per 23 CFR 772 Mn/DOT Training & Conference Center May 18, 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Mn/DOT Noise Policy for Type I Federal-aid Projects as per 23 CFR 772 Mn/DOT Training & Conference Center May 18, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mn/DOT Noise Policy for Type I Federal-aid Projects as per 23 CFR 772 Mn/DOT Training & Conference Center May 18, 2011

2 Todays presentation will cover: Selection and Use of Noise Analysis Locations Procedures for Field Noise Measurements Traffic Noise Analysis Documentation Public Involvement Related to Noise Studies Evaluating Viewpoints of Benefited Receptors Implementation Additional Resources Contact Information Questions

3 Noise Analysis Location Terminology Noise Receptor: a specific potentially noise sensitive location associated with a property; represents a noise measurement and/or noise prediction location Noise Measurement Location: a location where noise measurements are conducted; usually a noise receptor location Noise Prediction Location: a receptor location that includes a noise prediction but not a noise measurement Noise Sensitive Area (NSA): a group of noise receptors in a single geographic area, usually with the same land use Common Noise Environment: a group of receptors with the same Activity Category and exposed to similar noise sources Selection & Use of Noise Analysis Locations

4 FHWA Noise Abatement Criteria Activity Category Activity Criteria (1,2) L10(h), dBA Evaluation Location Activity Description A60ExteriorLands on which serenity and quiet are of extraordinary significance and serve an important public need and where the preservation of those qualities is essential if the area is to continue to serve its intended purpose. B(3)70ExteriorResidential C(3)70ExteriorActive sport areas, amphitheaters, auditoriums, campgrounds, cemeteries, day care centers, hospitals, libraries, medical facilities, parks, picnic areas, place of worship, playgrounds, public meeting rooms, public or nonprofit institutional structures, radio studios, recording studios, recreation areas, Section 4(f) sites, schools, television studios, trails, and trail crossings D55InteriorAuditoriums, daycare centers, hospitals, libraries, medical facilities, places of worship, public meeting rooms, public or nonprofit institutional structures, radio studios, recording studios, schools, and television studios E(3)75ExteriorHotels, motels, offices, restaurants/bars, and other developed lands, properties or activities not included in A-D or F F-- Agriculture, airports, bus yards, emergency services, industrial, logging, maintenance facilities, manufacturing, mining, rail yards, retail facilities, shipyards, utilities (water resources, water treatment, electrical), and warehousing G-- Undeveloped lands that are not permitted Notes (1)L10(h) shall be used for impact assessment. (2)The L10(h) Activity Criteria values are for impact determination only, and are not design standards for noise abatement measures. (3)Includes undeveloped lands permitted for this activity category.

5 Selection & Use of Noise Analysis Locations Assigning Noise Receptor Locations Exterior areas of frequent human use If no areas of frequent human use, then exterior position approximately 20 feet from the façade of the structure closest to the project Multi-story, multi-family buildings may require receptor locations on exterior balconies Do not use ROW line, front curb or sidewalk Maximum of 500 feet from roadway is a general rule of thumb See example on the following slide

6 5 FT 10 FT MIN 20 FT 2 nd FLOOR MODELING (ONLY) LOCATION R.O.W. 3 rd FLOOR MODELING (ONLY) LOCATION

7 Assigning Noise Receptors for Activity Category C Category C Activities: parks, recreation areas, sports areas, picnic areas, playgrounds, campgrounds, etc. One receptor per 100 feet of frequent human use frontage Usually receptor locations do not exceed 500 feet from the project roadway Handled on case by case basis/reviewed by Mn/DOT See example on the following slide Selection & Use of Noise Analysis Locations

8 120 FT MODELING LOCATIONS 400 FT

9 Selection & Use of Noise Analysis Locations Assigning Noise Receptors for Activity Category D and E Category D Activities : Interiors of select Category C auditoriums, schools, libraries, hospitals, office buildings, etc. See FHWA Guidance for estimate of interior noise levels as a function of building type Consult with Mn/DOT staff; done on a case by case basis Category E Activities : Exteriors of hotels, motels, offices, restaurants and other developed and undeveloped lands Less sensitive to highway traffic noise Consult with Mn/DOT staff, done on a case by case basis

10 Purpose for Conducting Noise Measurements for Traffic Noise Studies Validation (comparison) of noise model Measured vs. predicted within suitable agreement, i.e., +/- 3dB(A) Establish existing noise levels Used in areas where traffic is not the dominant noise source, i.e., new roadway alignment Determine loudest noise hour Document noise barrier performance Determine transmission loss Determine reference levels for pavement noise studies Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

11 Basic Procedures for Conducting Noise Measurements Must be consistent with: Minnesota Statute Measurement Methodology FHWAs Measurement of Highway Related Noise Equipment Type I or Type 2 integrating sound level meter (SLM) & tripod Field calibrator Weather instrumentation (wind speed & temperature) Optional but recommended: GPS transponder and digital camera Instrument Calibration SLMs and field calibrators must be within one-year factory or lab calibration, NIST traceable Field calibration is required before & after each measurement session Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

12 Measurement Locations & Set Up At least one measurement location for each noise sensitive area Represent exterior area of frequent human use If no areas of frequent human use, then exterior position approximately 20 feet from the façade of the structure closest to the project Do not use ROW line, front curb or sidewalk SLM microphone set 5 feet above ground level SLM set to A-weighting and Fast response SLM equipped with a 3.5 diameter foam wind screen (good condition) Conduct field calibration check; document on field data sheet Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

13 Measurement Times & Durations Two sets of readings at each selected location Recommend one morning (9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon) and one afternoon (1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.) Representative of worst hourly traffic noise condition (i.e., highest heavy truck volumes) Recommend 30 minute measurements

14 Documentation Field Data Sheet documents: Name, location, and land use Date and time of measurement Name and affiliation of person conducting the measurement SLM settings Results of pre- and post field calibration check Meteorological conditions (confirm dry roadways) Terrain conditions Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

15 Documentation (contd) Field Data Sheet documents: Site sketch Notes on observed noise sources during measurement (i.e., dogs barking, aircraft, emergency vehicles, etc.) Note measured noise levels (L10,Leq,L50, L90, Lmax & Lmin) Traffic counts (autos, medium and heavy trucks) GPS coordinates of SLM (optional) Photos of SLM, receptor, noise source (optional) Example Field Data Sheet on the following slides

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18 Interaction with Residents & Property Owners Exercise respect and professionalism Obtain permission to conduct measurements on private property Have proper documentation for personal identification Letter on agency letterhead referencing the project that requests permission to conduct measurements on their property Direct project related questions to the Project Manager Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

19 Common Mistakes & Poor Measurement Conditions to Avoid Avoid conducting noise measurements under the following conditions: Any type of active precipitation Any snow or ice cover between roadway and measurement location When pavement is wet With wind speeds > 12 mph On extremely hot or cold days (>100 degrees or < -20 degrees F) When relative humidity is > 90% or < 5% Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

20 Common Mistakes & Poor Measurement Conditions to Avoid Avoid conducting noise measurements under the following conditions: During other temporary noise activities (conversation, barking dogs, lawn maintenance, construction, children playing, etc.) Near localized noise sources, i.e., air conditioning units, swimming pool pump/filters, etc. Near large acoustically reflective surfaces or those that may block the line-of-sight to the highway Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

21 Common Mistakes & Poor Measurement Conditions to Avoid New Highway Alignments: Since traffic noise is not the dominant existing noise source, include non-highway sources in the measurement. Good Practice: Stand several feet away from the SLM during the measurement period to avoid interfering/contaminating the measurement.

22 Noise Model Validation (Comparison) If difference between measured and modeled levels is > 3 dB(A), check modeling site input parameters. If difference persists, consult with Mn/DOT staff to determine use of measured levels or use of adjustment factors. Technical References ANSI S FHWA Measurement of Highway Related Noise Minnesota Statute Measurement Methodology Guidance & Procedures for Field Noise Measurements

23 Introduction Project description Background on noise concepts and metrics Review of Federal and/or State noise policies Analysis Methodology Affected environment; define project limits Noise monitoring: locations, methodology, dates, equipment used, max and min monitored levels Guidance on Traffic Noise Analysis Documentation

24 Predicted Noise Levels and Noise Impacts Noise Receptors : general description, total number, activity category, location of greatest receptor concentration and figure denoting monitored and modeled receptors Noise Model Results : modeling assumptions and inputs, existing and future modeled levels, compare to FHWA NAC and State Standards, table for daytime and nighttime periods (see example in Appendix D)

25 Guidance on Traffic Noise Analysis Documentation Consideration of Noise Abatement Description of acceptable noise abatement measures Noise Barrier Evaluation Description of reasonability and feasibility requirements; provide table with all proposed noise abatement elements (see handout) Description of each NSA, noise barrier discussion Discuss noise barrier cost effectiveness for each barrier Discuss other noise mitigation techniques (if applicable)

26 Construction Noise Identify land uses affected by construction noise List typical construction equipment and processes to be used List measures to be used to minimize or eliminate construction noise impacts Guidance on Traffic Noise Analysis Documentation

27 Conclusions and Recommendations Statement of Likelihood General description of overall results and what mitigation is proposed Results of public participation Summary of solicitation results (if available by document completion) Guidance on Traffic Noise Analysis Documentation

28 Project File Information Field data sheets, photographs of monitored locations Modeled data, receptor information, including traffic data and barrier design information Print outs of modeling results Solicitation details Guidance on Traffic Noise Analysis Documentation

29 Purpose of Public Interaction To inform public about the project, including potential noise impacts and abatement options Provide existing and future noise levels Include visual depictions of the proposed noise abatement Provide information regarding barrier performance at specific receptor locations Collect input from public regarding their desire for proposed noise abatement Relay information in simple, understandable terms Guidance on Public Involvement Related to Noise Studies

30 Public Interaction Tools and Techniques Many available tools; may need a combination of efforts Choice depends on project aspects, i.e., size, number of public impacted, level of project controversy Must be properly promoted; possibly at different locations and times Venues: project office, local church, school or community center, etc. Best held in early evening hours May be appropriate to hold more than one meeting on different nights Guidance on Public Involvement Related to Noise Studies

31 Public Meetings Most frequently used tool for relaying information & soliciting viewpoints Seminar format Pro: all present hear the same information Con: too intimidating for some to speak up Open house format Pro: more hands-on/interactive, may ask questions at their own pace Con: lack of formal presentation, must visit all stations to be informed Seminar / open house combination Pro: advantages of both seminar and open house format Con: requires more time and planning

32 Direct Mail and Door Hangers Materials must appear official; doesnt look like junk mail Telephone Surveys and Information Lines Useful for meeting reminders; not effective for relaying project details Useful to ask project related questions / request further information Internet Web Pages Effective for disseminating project information; announcing meetings, etc. Should also use other traditional methods to reach all parties Guidance on Public Involvement Related to Noise Studies

33 Door to Door Canvassing May be useful if other methods have failed Only when impacted number is small Media Announcements Useful to promote public meetings Not recommended for detailed project information Public Interaction Timing After preliminary noise analysis / prior to final design (during NEPA process / may assist in selecting chosen alternative) Guidance on Public Involvement Related to Noise Studies

34 Guidance for Evaluating Viewpoints of Benefited Receptors Sample Letter with Ballot Note the sentences highlighted in red.

35 September 1, 2010 Dear Resident or Owner, (may want to privatize) The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) is proposing to construct a noise barrier along the north side of Highway 99 in the City of Nowhere, from First Avenue to Third Street as part of the reconstruction of Highway 99. It was determined that your property will experience the benefit of a reduction in traffic noise if the proposed noise barrier is constructed. This is your one-time opportunity to express your opinion on this proposed noise barrier. An informational open house is set for Wednesday, September 29 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Nowhere City Hall, 20 Fun Street East. Mn/DOT representatives and city officials will be on hand to provide information and visualization materials on the proposed noise barrier. Individuals with a disability or who need reasonable accommodations to participate should contact (name) at (phone number) by (dateusually a few days before open house). Speech-impaired, deaf, and hard of hearing persons should contact the Minnesota Relay Service at 711 or (TTY, Voice or ASCII). Most importantly, the open house aims to solicit your input on whether or not to build the noise barrier. As mentioned above, this is a one-time opportunity to receive a noise barrier as part of this project. Please take the time to make your opinion known on this noise barrier issue. A short opinion form is attached below. You may bring your completed form to the open house, however, additional forms will also be available at the open house. If youre unable to attend, you may fax your completed form to (phone number) or mail it to (name) at (organization name and address) by (date). This notice has been mailed only to benefited residents and owners (those units getting a reduction in noise of 5 decibels or more as a result of the construction of the noise barrier). If you have neighbors who did not receive this notice but are interested in the project, theyre also welcome to attend for more information, but only the input of benefited residences will be considered in making the final determination. Sincerely, John Doe Public Affairs Please mark one: Owner___ Resident___ Owner & Resident___ Name and Address:____________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________ Please mark one: Yes, I want the noise barrier _____ No, I do not want the noise barrier _____ Comments: ________________________________________________________________

36 NEW: Solicit viewpoints of benefited owners/residents Benefited, directly abutting the highway (first row): Property owner receives 4 points, resident receives 2 points Property owner/resident receives 6 points Benefited, non-abutting (second row and beyond): Property owner receives 2 points, resident receives 1 point Property owner/resident receives 3 points Property with common land ownership: Home is occupied by owner/resident; receives 6 points Property is owned by the Association; receives 4 points See Example in Appendix F

37 NEW: Solicit viewpoints of benefited owners/residents Manufactured home parks: Weighted the same as property owner and residents for direct abutters and second row and beyond Multi-family residential buildings: Only those benefited have a vote according to the same point system Activity Categories C & E: Placement of non-residential receptors Unique variations of scenarios; see Appendix B for guidance Must be reviewed by Mn/DOT noise staff Only yes or no votes; no split votes Non-benefiting receptors do not receive points Simple majority of all possible points must be against the wall for it NOT to be built (See Appendix F).

38 Example of Resident/Owner Viewpoint Point Counting 6 benefited receptors Receptors A, B, C & D are direct abutters Receptors E & F are not direct abutters Receptors A & B: two units within same duplex Resident B owns both units; rents unit A Receptors C & E are owner/resident Receptors D & F are rental units All voted except for receptor D Guidance for Evaluating Viewpoints of Benefited Receptors

39 * The resident for receptor D did not vote.

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42 Implementation Implementation is triggered by the start of the NEPA process 1. Start of NEPA on or after June 1, 2011: Use the new Noise Policy. 2. Start of NEPA prior to June 1, 2011: If noise analysis is started 1 prior to July 13 th, use old Noise Policy. 3. Start of NEPA prior to June 1, 2011: If noise analysis is started 1 after July 13, use the new Noise Policy. 1 Start of noise analysis is indicated by the completion of at least one noise model run: i.e., there is (or is not) a feasible noise abatement measure for those impacted receptors that also meets the $3250/dB/residence cost effectiveness threshold. 2 July 13, 2011 : Implementation date of final Federal Rule.

43 Additional Resources Appendix G: Includes references and links to additional resources: Minnesota State Noise Regulations OES Website: Highway Project Development Process Manual updated to reflect the new Noise Policy (work in progress) FHWA Highway Traffic Noise: Analysis & Abatement Guidance FHWA/Volpe Measurement of Highway-Related Noise FHWA Noise Barrier Design Handbook FHWA Construction Noise Handbook FHWA Noise and Environment Website

44 Marilyn Jordahl Larson, Environmental Stewardship: Mel Roseen, Environmental Stewardship: Peter Wasko, Metro District: Gary Reihl, State Aid: Contact Information

45 Questions???


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