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U.S. Flag Etiquette. Why Red, White, & Blue? Red – Valor & Hardiness White – Purity & Innocence Blue – Vigilance, Perseverance, & Justice.

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Presentation on theme: "U.S. Flag Etiquette. Why Red, White, & Blue? Red – Valor & Hardiness White – Purity & Innocence Blue – Vigilance, Perseverance, & Justice."— Presentation transcript:

1 U.S. Flag Etiquette

2 Why Red, White, & Blue? Red – Valor & Hardiness White – Purity & Innocence Blue – Vigilance, Perseverance, & Justice

3 Why Red, White, & Blue? George Washingtons Legend: Stars came from the night sky Red from British colors White stripes to symbolize secession from home (England).

4 U.S. Flag Etiquette Who sewed the first flag? Betsy Ross What are some nicknames of the US flag? Old Glory, Stars and Stripes, The Star Spangled Banner

5 U.S. Flag Etiquette How many stars are on the flag now? 50 What do the stars stand for? Number of states How many stripes are on the flag? 13What do the stripes stand for? The 13 original states

6 U.S. Flag Etiquette Etiquette – is proper behavior or the proper way something should be done The Flag should be raised and lowered by hand. The flag should be displayed only from sunrise until sunset.

7 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag may be displayed on all days, weather permitting, particularly on national and state holidays and historic and special occasions.

8 U.S. Flag Etiquette No flag may be flown above the U.S. flag or to the right of it at the same height.

9 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag should never touch or drag the ground or floor beneath it.

10 U.S. Flag Etiquette Do you have to destroy the flag if it touches the ground accidentally? No. You should, of course, try to avoid having the flag touch the ground. But if it does, you should correct the situation immediately.

11 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag may be flown at half staff (mast) by order of the president, usually to mourn the death of a public official.

12 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property

13 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always carried aloft and free.

14 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag should not be used as part of a costume or athletic uniform, except that a flag patch may be used on the uniform of military personnel, fireman, policeman and members of patriotic organizations (this is a tradition that has changed over the past couple of decades)

15 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature

16 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature

17 U.S. Flag Etiquette The flag should never be used as wearing apparel

18 U.S. Flag Etiquette When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left

19 U.S. Flag Etiquette When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left

20 U.S. Flag Etiquette When the flag becomes old and tattered, it should be destroyed by burning (customary).

21 U.S. Flag Etiquette When the flag becomes old and tattered, it should be destroyed by burning (customary).

22 Is burning the U.S. flag in protest a crime?

23 No. Despite several attempts each year by members of the House of Representatives to pass an amendment to overrule Supreme Court decisions allowing the burning of the U.S. flag as a First Amendment right, it fails to be passed by the Senate.

24 Pledge of Allegiance I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of American and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible with liberty and justice for all

25 History of the Star-Spangled Banner by Francis Scott Key This song is the national anthem of the United States. The poem that formed the basis of the lyrics was penned in 1814 by Francis Scott Key, a 35-year old lawyer who was sent to negotiate with the British in an attempt to gain the release of an American prisoner they were holding. On September 7, Key reached the British fleet and after a few days of negotiations, secured the release of the prisoner. However, the British planned to attack Baltimore and would not release the Americans until after the battle. On September 13, the British launched a fierce bombardment of Fort McHenry in Baltimore that lasted throughout the night, an event Key witnessed from the deck of a US truce ship. The next morning (in the "dawn's early light") Key saw the Americans take down the battle-torn US flag at the fort and replace it with a larger one. This inspired him to write down notes for his famous poem, which he finished upon his return to Baltimore the evening of the 16th. Key later described the event: "Through the clouds of the was the stars of that banner still shone in my view, and I saw the discomfited host of its assailants driven back in ignominy to their ships. Then, in he hour of deliverance, and joyful triumph, my heart spoke; and 'Does not such a country and such defenders of their country deserve a song?' was its question."

26 The Star Spangled Banner Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming? Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there. Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?


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