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Demonstration of Common Core Lesson Charles Dickens Hard Times.

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1 Demonstration of Common Core Lesson Charles Dickens Hard Times

2 FIRST READING OF TEXT: Read the excerpt from Hard Times (1854) by Charles Dickens silently. As you read, try to visualize some of the specific details he describes.

3 SECOND READING OF TEXT: This time, your teacher will read the text out loud as you follow along. Pay particular attend to the underlined words in the passage and how the words are used.

4 Working with your partner, use the clues from the sentence and word parts to determine the meaning of the underlined words in the selection. In the second column write specific clues to the words meaning, followed by what you think the word means in the third column. Highlight any other words you do not know that you can ask about later. A Closer Look at Key Vocabulary

5 From Hard Times by Charles Dickens It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it…it was a town of machinery and tall chimneys, out of which interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves forever and ever. What does it mean to terminate something? What does the prefix in mean? How does the suffix able affect the meaning of the word? How do the words forever and ever help you understand the meaning?

6 From Hard Times by Charles Dickens …the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness. Can you think of other words with the prefix mono in them? (monologue, monogamy) What does the prefix mono mean? Do you see parts of any other words in the word? What does tone mean? What does monotone mean? If you add –ly, what does it do to the word?

7 From Hard Times by Charles Dickens ….every day was the same as yesterday and tomorrow, and every year the counterpart of the last and the next. What clues in this sentence helps us understand the meaning of the word counterpart?

8 From Hard Times by Charles Dickens These attributes of Coketown were in the main inseparable from the work by which it was sustained; against them were to be set off, comforts of life which found their way all over the world, and elegancies of life which made, we will not ask how much of the fine lady, who could scarcely bear to hear the place mentioned. What word forms the basis of elegancies? Do you know what elegant means? What clues in the sentence help the reader determine the meaning of the word?

9 From Hard Times by Charles Dickens The solitary exception was the New Church; a stuccoed edifice with a square steeple over the door, terminating in four short pinnacles like florid wooden legs. How does the structure of the sentence and the use of the semi colon help you determine the meaning of edifice? With other clues exist in the sentence?

10 What is the Text Structure? Narrative Descriptive Problem-Solution Comparative Cause-Effect Sequence Question-Answer Cyclical Identify clues to the text structure in the text.

11 What is the Text Structure? Narrative Descriptive Problem-Solution Comparative Cause-Effect Sequence Question-Answer Cyclical Identify clues to the text structure in the text.

12 Text Marking Write the letter T over any words in the text describing the town in the passage. Write the letter P over any words describing the people in the passage.

13 Challenging Text-based Questions Work with a partner in creating challenging text- based-questions based on the passage and text markings.

14 Lets Take a Look at Your Questions.

15 How does the authors description of Coketown serve as an editorial on industrial England? In your analysis, address the techniques Dickens uses to create his descriptions and what the descriptions indicate about his views of industrialization. Culminating Writing

16 Review the sample student paper on the writing prompt. Look at evaluation slide scale. What does this student do well? What does this student need to improve? A Sample Writing

17 Document 2: Observations on the Effect of the Manufacturing System by Robert Owen Reading #1: As I read the text aloud, follow along with the purpose of determining the authors opinion of industrialization.

18 Determining Meaning Through Context …the character of the lower orders in Britain is formed chiefly by circumstances arising from trade, manufactures, and commerce. All are sedulously trained to buy cheap and to sell dear… Based on the sentence before, who is the all the author is referring to? If the factory owners character is formed chiefly by trade, then how are they being trained? Factory Owners Intensely, Earnestly

19 Reading #2 Work with a partner to read the excerpt again and develop text-based questions that could be used in a discussion. Ex: Please read the first 2 sentences. The manufacturing system has already so far extended its influence over the British Empire, as to effect an essential change in the general character of the mass of the people. This alteration is still in rapid progress; and ere long, the comparatively happy simplicity of the agricultural peasant will be wholly lost amongst us. What is the author implying when he refers to the comparatively happy simplicity of the agricultural peasant? What is the fallacy, or error, in this reasoning?

20 The Basic Elements of Argument A claim is a statement or assertion that conveys the writers interpretations or beliefs. In an argument, there is usually a governing claim and supporting sub- claims. Evidence is facts, figures, details, quotations, examples, or other sources of data and information that provide support for claims or analysis that can be evaluated by others. A warrant is the logical connection between a claim and the evidence.

21 The Case of the Dead Musician The musician didnt kill himself. Look at where his feet are. If he hanged himself, his feet wouldve been below the top of the stool. Claim Evidence Warrant

22 Reading #3 – Text Marking Read through the article again and mark the text using the following code: C – Claim E – Evidence W – Warrant Lets find the governing claim(s) together.

23 Text Marking The manufacturing system has already so far extended its influence over the British Empire, as to effect an essential change in the general character of the mass of the people. This alteration is still in rapid progress; and ere long, the comparatively happy simplicity of the agricultural peasant will be wholly lost amongst us. It is even now scarcely anywhere to be found without a mixture of those habits which are the offspring of trade, manufactures, and commerce. C C

24 Text Marking Now, read through the article independently and mark the text using the following code: C – Claim E – Evidence W – Warrant

25 Talk with your table about your text marking. Pay special attention to areas in which you disagree or marked differently. Text Marking

26 Writing Prompt Consider the argument Robert Owens presents on the negative influences of industrialization. Write a response that analyzes the strengths and/or weaknesses of the argument. Remember to use textual evidence to support your ideas.

27 Writing Check To ensure that your response contains all of the elements of an analysis, re-read your response and mark it with the following text code: C – Claim E – Evidence W - Warrant

28 28 Making Evidence-Based Claims

29 Extension of Activity The painting on the next slide is William Wyldes Manchester from Kersal Moor (1852). Teachers could use Reading Standard 7 (Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.) and develop teaching activities and a prompt that addresses the text documents and the painting.

30 30

31 Homework For next time, review the CCSS for your content and grade. Select one document to teach that aligns with the CCSS. Be sure the text is rich enough to support a discussion of complex ideas and themes. Pour over the document to identify the questions that stimulate close reading. Bring your text and questions to our next meeting on Monday, February 18 th.


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