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Leon County Schools 8 th and 10 th Grade Writing Training Leon County Schools Office of Curriculum Services Friday, September 30, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Leon County Schools 8 th and 10 th Grade Writing Training Leon County Schools Office of Curriculum Services Friday, September 30, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leon County Schools 8 th and 10 th Grade Writing Training Leon County Schools Office of Curriculum Services Friday, September 30, 2013

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3 Organization of Notebooks Insert the cover sheet on the front. Create five dividers with the following headings: Data Scoring Teaching Ideas Ready-made Lessons Resources As we move through activities today, we will instruct you where the materials go.

4 Using FCAT Writing Data to Inform Instruction

5 Leon County Schools 2013 FCAT Writing Results (1)What is considered proficient for FCAT Writing? (2)What percentage of your students met proficiency? (3)What percentage of your students did not meet proficiency? (4)How does our district proficiency rate in middle school compare with the state proficiency rate in middle school? (5)How does our district proficiency rate in high school compare with the state proficiency rate in high school? (6)Where does Leon County Schools rank in the state with writing proficiency in middle school? (7)Where does Leon County Schools rank in the state with writing proficiency in high school?

6 Lets take a closer look at our papers to understand why so many of our students were unable to earn a 4.

7 Read and discuss the papers in your packet that earned a 5. Make a list of the characteristics of these papers. In other words, what are the writers of 5 papers doing to achieve success?

8 Read and discuss the papers in your packet that earned a score of 4. Make a list of the characteristics of these papers. What do writers who earn a 4 do well? What are the differences between papers scoring a 4 and a 5?

9 Read and discuss the papers in your packet that earned a score of 3. Make a list of the characteristics of these papers. What are the differences between papers scoring a 4 and a 3? What are the areas of weakness in the papers scoring a 3?

10 1.Get together with your grade level colleagues from the other schools. 2.Discuss the characteristics of papers scoring a 5 and make a compiled list on chart paper. 3.Discuss the characteristics of papers scoring a 4 and make a compiled list on chart paper. 4.Discuss the characteristics of papers scoring a 3 and make a compiled list on chart paper. 5.Review your 3, 4, and 5 lists and discuss the instructional implications for your students who scored a Make a list of instructional needs/goals for your students who scored 3s based on your analysis. COMPILATION OF GROUP ANALYSIS

11 What does this tell us about the instruction we need to provide for our students to move beyond the 3?

12 A Return to Writing Process Instruction

13 Mini Simulation of Writing to a WUR Prompt using the Writing Process

14 Sample Prompt You have been given a Writes upon Request booklet with a practice prompt. Lets read the prompt together. Youve been asked to speak to a group of prospective teachers on what makes a great teacher. Think about what exemplifies great teaching. Now write to explain to prospective teachers your view on what exemplifies great teaching.

15 PREWRITING: The power is in the thinking.

16 Three Steps in Prewriting 1.Analyze the prompt 2.Generate ideas for topics. 3.Organize ideas into a graphic organizer or outline.

17 Prewriting Step One: Analyze the prompt. Step Two: Generate ideas for writing. Step Three: Organize ideas using a graphic organizer.

18 Prewriting Step One: Analyze the prompt. Purpose (P) – Determine the purpose for writing. Audience (A) – Identify to whom you are writing. Subject (S) What is the subject for writing?

19 Lets analyze our prompt. Identify purpose, audience, and subject. Youve been asked to speak to a group of prospective teachers on what makes a great teacher. Think about what exemplifies great teaching. Now write to explain to prospective teachers your view on what exemplifies great teaching.

20 Lets analyze our prompt. Identify purpose, audience, and subject. Youve been asked to speak to a group of prospective teachers on what makes a great teacher. Think about what exemplifies great teaching. Now write to explain to prospective teachers your view on what exemplifies great teaching. PURPOSE AUDIENCE SUBJECT

21 Prewriting Step One: Analyze the prompt. Step Two: Generate ideas for writing. Step Three: Organize ideas using a graphic organizer.

22 After analyzing prompt, brainstorm ideas on back of planning sheet. Turn your paper over. Together, lets make a list of qualities of exemplary teachers. As I write these on the screen, please make the list on the back of your planning sheet. Lets try to identify three of the ideas that provide the most examples for elaboration. Lets jot down some of our examples by the three ideas that we picked to be sure we have enough to talk about.

23 Prewriting Step One: Analyze the prompt. Step Two: Generate ideas for writing. Step Three: Organize ideas using a graphic organizer.

24 Organizing Ideas for Writing Which ideas have the most evidence that you can discuss comfortably? Lets use those ideas for our main ideas. As a group, lets select three to discuss. Now, turn your paper over and create a graphic organizer with three columns and three rows.

25 Organize your ideas by creating a Tic-Tac-Toe Grid.

26 Organizing Ideas for Writing Subject or Topic for Writing: Main point 1Main point 2Main point 3 Example 1 Example 2

27 Organizing Ideas for Writing Subject or Topic for Writing: Main point 1Main point 2Main point 3 Example 1 Example 2 What makes an exemplary teacher Someone who builds a personal relationship with the student. Egyptian student I tutored on writing and ACT My 9 th grade English teacher and Anchor Club sponsor

28 DRAFTING

29 As we go through the activities today, keep your eye on the prize. The writing is focused on the topic, and its organizational pattern provides for a logical progression of ideas. Effective use of transitional devices contributes to a sense of completeness. The support is developed through ample use of specific details and examples. The writing demonstrates a mature command of language, and there is variation in sentence structure. The response generally follows the conventions of mechanics, usage, punctuation, and spelling.

30 Drafting: The Introduction

31 What does a high-scoring introduction look like? Lets take a minute to look at examples of introductions ranging in quality. At your table, read and discuss the introductions for students scoring between a 1 and a 6. What are the qualities of introductions scoring a 4, 5, and 6? What are the differences between the 3 and the 4? DISCLAIMER: Remember that papers are scored holistically, so an introduction may not be winning attribute of the paper.

32 How to Write an Introduction: The Basics Start with something that provides a context that connects the prompt to the real world. Think BIG PICTURE. Present a thesis statement or claim that expresses in clear and direct language your answer to the prompt. You may choose to outline the main points of your essay but avoid supporting details and trite listing.

33 Lets look at my example. Many people have pondered the question, Is a great teacher born or is a great teacher made? Although this question may be hard to answer, it does prompt a discussion about the qualities of an exemplary teacher. As you embark on your venture into the world of teaching, I encourage you to consider the importance of building personal relationships with students, engaging them in meaningful learning experiences, and expecting the very best from them.

34 Now you try. At your table, work with your group members to create a strong introduction based on any of the three attributes you identified at your table. Put on chart paper in large letters. Be prepared to share with whole group. You have 10 minutes.

35 The Importance of Real World Examples of Introductions Introductions from articles in newspapers and magazines can be used to show students how real writers introduce an article. Be sure to use articles that reflect the kind of writing you are addressing in class. Science articles are great for expository and persuasive. They also present a great opportunity to blend reading and writing.

36 From The New York Times blog WHEN I was growing up, a student would be sent down to the principals office for chewing gum in class. We were told chewing gum was bad; it caused cavities. Like chocolate and coffee, gum is now being rehabilitated. It turns out that sugar-free gum can actually prevent cavities in children. Instead of banning it, we should require children to chew it in school to promote their oral health.

37 From The New York Times blog Its becoming clear that we can grow all the food we need, and profitably, with far fewer chemicals. And Im not talking about imposing some utopian vision of small organic farms on the world. Conventional agriculture can shed much of its chemical use if it wants to.

38 DRAFTING THE BODY PARAGRAPHS

39 How to Write Body Paragraphs: The Basics Start with your main idea. What is the main point you will be discussing? Explain your evidence. Remember that your evidence should be authentic. This means use something you have witnessed first hand, read about, seen on television or the Internet, etc. Dont make up information without some knowledge. Explain how your evidence supports your main idea. You must show the connection between your main idea and the evidence.

40 Lets look at an example of a body paragraph for our prompt. Without a personal relationship with the students, the teacher will not get a firm commitment from a student. The old expression, Students dont care what you know until they know what you care, is absolutely true. I had a student many years ago who came to the U.S. from Egypt with little to no English skills. I asked him to write a personal narrative about his life in Egypt. I then sat down and worked with him in making editorial changes. The personal one-on-one time I spent with him built a positive relationship that led to after-school tutoring sessions on the ACT. Eventually, he was able to achieve all of the requirements for graduation. I believe his willingness to work hard was built largely on the relationship I had with him.

41 Now you try. Using the introductory paragraph you created previously, write a body paragraph for one of your main points. Use Ways to Elaborate resource from Orange County Schools. Put it on chart paper and be prepared to share. You have 10 minutes.

42 DRAFTING THE CONCLUSION

43 Drafting the Conclusion The conclusion is one of the most difficult parts of a paper to write, and often, the least discussed. A good conclusion should revisit the original thesis. provide a statement that answers, So what? leave the reader thinking about the significance of the thesis. Use emotion or discuss impact for future for effect. Lets take a look at a conclusion.

44 Lets look at an example of a conclusion. As a 30 year veteran of the classroom, I will soon leave my school and you will enter with fresh ideas and enthusiasm for teaching. There will be challenges along the way, but never lose sight of the basics of great teaching. To achieve greatness in in this field, always remember the importance of the student-teacher relationship, the role of engagement in learning, and the power of high expectation. With these tools in your toolbox, you are sure to achieve the greatness that many before you discovered too late to make a difference.

45 Now you try. At your tables, create an alternative conclusion that addresses your thesis. Put on chart paper. You have 10 minutes.

46 Feedback and revision are necessities for our success!

47 Scoring Method for FCAT Writing FOCUS: The theme or unifying point is clearly established and maintained throughout. ORGANIZATION: Students demonstrate effective organization pattern and strong, well-crafted transitions that are embedded in the text. SUPPORT: Students provide elaborated examples and the relationship between supporting ideas and the topic is clear. Specific and relevant details are used, in addition to precise word choice. CONVENTIONS: Students vary sentence structure and follow basic conventions.

48 Strive for the five. The writing is focused on the topic, and its organizational pattern provides for a logical progression of ideas. Effective use of transitional devices contributes to a sense of completeness. The support is developed through ample use of specific details and examples. The writing demonstrates a mature command of language, and there is variation in sentence structure. The response generally follows the conventions of mechanics, usage, punctuation, and spelling.

49 Instructional Practices that Result in Higher Scoring Papers: Revision Since we want our students to aspire, at the very least, to achieve a 5, lets review the papers scoring a 5 in the calibration set. As I read the papers out loud, make annotations regarding focus, organization, support, and conventions. Pay particular attention to mature command of language and syntax.

50 Encourage the use of alternatives to the words lacking specificity. Provide a reference sheet with alternatives to words that are overused. During the process of writing or revising, encourage students to select words from the list to use. What are some other ways this list could be used in the writing process?

51 Practice with Feedback: A Sample Paper 1)Follow along with me as I read the sample paper out loud. 2)Consider the papers you have seen that scored a 5, paying attention to focus, organization, support, and conventions. 3)Dont forget mature command of language and syntax. 4)Identify places in this paper where improvement is needed to move to a higher score. 5)Discuss at your table.

52 What should feedback look like? 1)Teacher feedback should be specific enough that the student knows what to do to improve the draft. 2)When opportunity presents itself, address mature command of language and syntax. 3)In addition to suggestions for improvement, include specific praise for parts that are deserving of praise. 4)While some corrections for conventions are appropriate, avoid overwhelming the student with proofreading marks. 5) Consider limiting your comments to 2-3.

53 Provide feedback on this paper. 1)Work with your table group to create 3 comments that would help a student improve this paper. 1)Write your comments on the draft.

54 Revision can be as simple as one paragraph As a group, select one paragraph which corresponds to your feedback and revise it.

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56 An Idea for Addressing Conventions in Student Writing While reviewing student papers, make a list of common mistakes in conventions. Collect examples of sentences from student papers and create a handout. Review the rules yourself so that you are prepared to address common mistakes. Give the students the handout, allowing them a few minutes for each item to make corrections. Once they have tried to correct on their own, go over each item with them. Get the students to write down the rules as you review them with the sample sentences.

57 Lets practice. Lets correct #1 together: There are three major qualities that make a great teacherthe ability to connect with students on a personal level, the commitment to do whatever is needed to engage every student in the subject matter, and the expectation and follow-through that they will perform at high levels. What needs to be corrected in this sentence and what are the rules?

58 Lets practice. Here are my corrections: There are three major qualities that make a great teacher: the ability to connect with students on a personal level, the commitment to do whatever is needed to engage every student in learning, and the expectation that they will perform at high levels. Lets review the rules I used to defend my changes.

59 THE COLON OR THE DASH WHICH ONE SHOULD I USE? (1) Use a colon for lists, but make sure everything before the colon is an independent clause (complete sentence). Barbara gave three reasons for not going: it was stormy, she didnt like loud music, and she preferred the company of her cats. (2) Use a colon to introduce an appositive you want to emphasize. Again, make sure everything before the colon is an independent clause. I finally found the perfect food: chocolate! (3) Use a colon to introduce quotations. Everything before must be an independent clause. When Daryl appeared, he made a big announcement: Im married!

60 WHEN NOT TO USE COLONS Do not use colons after include or any form of include. I remembered to bring everything, including: candy, nuts, and drinks. (WRONG) (Note that there is no independent clause before the colon.)

61 WHEN DO YOU USE A DASH? To showcase a list or interruption in thought in the middle of an independent clause. For example: Three of my favorite foodsravioli, tiramisu, and gelatooriginated in Italy. James cant make ithe caught the flu from his sisterbut hopefully hell be better by tomorrow. To indicate interrupted speech in dialogue. For example:What if weNo, I have a better idea! To emphasize a sentence. For example: You can give Alicia her birthday cardjust make sure to send it on time.

62 Lets go on to student sentence #2. Once a relationship is established, the next step for a great teacher is to engage the students in the skills and content of youre class. What is wrong with this sentence?

63 Corrections to Sentence 2 Once a relationship is established, the next step for a great teacher is to engage the students in the skills and content of youre class. Two errors: (1)Teacher is the singular noun (antecedent). The pronoun your does not agree with its antecedent. (2)Youre is a contraction that stands for you are. The possessive pronoun your is needed here.

64 Corrections to Sentence 2 Once a relationship is established, the next step for a great teacher is to engage the students in the skills and content of the class. Two errors: (1)Teacher is the singular noun (antecedent). The pronoun your does not agree with its antecedent. (2)Youre is a contraction that stands for you are. To avoid the messiness of the terms his or her, I elected to eliminate the pronoun altogether.

65 Lets go on to student sentence 3. But even more important these experiences help kids develop high level thinking skills they need for success. What is wrong with this sentence?

66 Sentence Corrections More importantly, these experiences help kids develop high-level thinking skills they need for success. Two errors: (1)Importantly is intended to describe the words help develop, not the word, experiences. The wordsmore and importantly are both adverbs, and adverbs describe verbs. (2)Two words working together to describe a noun should be hyphenated to eliminate confusion.

67 Lets go on to student sentence 4. Finally, a great teacher has great expectations for their students. What is wrong with this sentence?

68 Sentence Corrections Finally, a great teacher has great expectations for his or her students. One error: The pronoun their (plural) does not agree with its antecedent, teacher (singular).

69 Lets go on to student sentence 5. We all may disagree on the 1 st question but there is no doubt that having a relationship with kids in addition to engaging them in learning and high expectations are all necessary for a teacher to exemplify greatness. What is wrong with this sentence?

70 Sentence Corrections We all may disagree on the 1 st question but there is no doubt that having a relationship with kids in addition to engaging them in learning and high expectations are all necessary for a teacher to exemplify greatness. Errors: This sentence is a run-on. It has three independent clauses and one dependent clause joined by four conjunctions. We have two options: (1) Change this into two sentences, or (2) Re-work this sentence to tighten it up.

71 Sentence Corrections Everyone has different ideas about whether great teachers are born or made, but this we do know– exemplary teachers build meaningful relationships with their students, engage them in powerful learning experiences, and expect the very best from them.

72 Editing: Applying the Rule to Your Own Draft After reviewing common errors and practicing corrections, direct students to look for theshowcased errors in their own papers or their classmates papers. Create a proofreaders checklist and add rules as you address them in class. (See OCPS Resource.) Once you have given feedback and students have done revisions and editing, ask them to complete a final draft. If you are technologically savvy, explore ways to provide feedback through turnitin.com, electronic submissions, etc.

73 PUBLISHING

74 An Idea for Strategically Teaching Grammar and Conventions Lay out your yearly plan for literature and writing by nine weeks. (See sample plan.) After reviewing the CCSS for language/conventions and considering your own students needs, lay out a plan to address language and conventions that aligns with your literature and writing goals. Designate a rule a week and create 4-5 sentences with errors for practice. At the end of the nine weeks, create a review sheet of rules/practice for your students. Review and test on the skills.

75 District Recommendations for Writing Teachers should regularly integrate elements of writing process into weekly lessons. Students should regularly participate in a 3-5 day writing workshop activity that includes prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. (Traditional WUR prompts should be included.) Feedback and revision should be frequent, particularly for those students at risk of scoring below proficiency. Teachers are required to participate in three district- sponsored training/scoring dates.

76 Now what? In your departments, reflect on the conversations and activities from today. Make a plan to strategically address your students specific writing needs. Re-dedicate time to teaching the writing process with literature-based writing activities, creative writing activities, and –yes– prompt writing. Dedicate time to teaching parts of the writing process in your weekly lessons. Provide regular feedback on student writing and require revisions on a small and large scale. Nurture authentic writing with your students.

77 With Your Group Use the vertical alignment of College Board and Common Core State Standards for your grade. Use the nine-week template to designate writing, language, grammar and convention skills for each nine weeks.

78 Instructional Implications We must re-emphasize writing process instruction in our language arts classrooms. Feedback and revision are needed, particularly for our students scoring 3.0. A balance of creative, text-dependent, and prompt writing activities utilizing the writing process will help our 3s achieve success.

79 Resources Introductory writing process lesson plans are available for middle and high school on our Sharepoint site. Orange County Public Schools Writing Guide has been loaded on our Sharepoint page as well.

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81 Scoring Dates for Writes Upon Request and Text Dependent Writing Writes Upon Request Scoring for 8 th and 10 th Grade Language Arts Teachers: 8/30,10/7, and 12/9 Text Dependent Writing Follow-up for LA Teachers of 6 th, 7 th, and 9 th grades – 10/17


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