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Chapter Four – The Bill of Rights Section One The first ten Amendments to the Constitution –W–While the Constitution describes the powers and authority.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Four – The Bill of Rights Section One The first ten Amendments to the Constitution –W–While the Constitution describes the powers and authority."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Four – The Bill of Rights Section One The first ten Amendments to the Constitution –W–While the Constitution describes the powers and authority of the national government. –T–The Bill of Rights describes the powers and rights of the American citizens. –R–Ratified in 1791 – it shows the Framers strong belief in the principles of limited government.

2 The First Amendment –M–Most widely known and discussed –F–Five basic freedoms Speech Religion Press Assembly Freedom to petition the government

3 The Second Amendment –A–Allowed to serve in state militia and bear arms –R–Realistic view of the right to bear arms

4 The Third Amendment –L–Limit the Government in quartering soldiers peace time and in war time.

5 The Fourth Amendment –P–Protects citizens from illegal search and seizures. –U–Use of a search warrant

6 The Fifth Amendment –C–Cannot be tried without being indicted –P–Prevents double jeopardy –R–Right to remain silent –D–Due process of law –E–Eminent domain

7 The Sixth Amendment –P–Protects those accused of crimes Told of charges Trial by jury Speedy trial Right to confront witnesses against them Right to a lawyer

8 The Seventh Amendment –T–The right to trail by jury in civil (versus criminal) cases over $ –T–Tort law

9 The Eighth Amendment –P–Prohibits excessive bail or fines –P–Prohibits cruel and unusual punishment

10 The Ninth Amendment –S–Specifies that the rights listed in the Constitution are not the individuals only rights. –M–Many of the rights we enjoy are not listed in the Constitution, yet still protected.

11 The Tenth Amendment –S–States that the rights not specifically assigned to the national government, belong to the states or the people. VS

12 Section One Terms Define the following –S–Search warrant –I–Indict –D–Double jeopardy –D–Due process of law –E–Eminent domain –B–Bail

13 Chapter Four –The Bill of Rights Section Two The First Amendment –D–Democracy requires an open exchange of ideas –F–Freedoms under the First Amendment are the hallmarks of freedom. –N–New ideas allow a democracy to grow and change –F–Freedom of religion, press, speech, assembly and petition are the foundation of America.

14 Freedom of Religion –P–Protects freedom of religion in two ways Prohibits Congress from establishing an official religion –S–Separation of church and state Allows citizens to practice religion as they wish

15 Freedom of Speech –A–Allowed to say what is on their mind without fear of punishment, in public and/or private Limits –S–Slander –T–Treason –fire –F–Freedom of speech has been expanded to cover issues such as art, music and even clothing. –Interpretation and others rights

16 Chapter Four –The Bill of Rights Section Two Freedom of Press –A–Allowed to express oneself in print –M–Magazines, books and newspapers –T–Today includes TV, radio and internet –N–Not only to publish, but to read –l–libel

17 Freedom of Assembly –A–Assemble in groups as long as they are peaceful –A–Attend meetings, parades, rallies etc. –R–Right to form and join organizations –B–Belong to any group

18 Freedom of Petition –T–The right to express our ideas to the government –W–We can write our representatives and request something or express our point of view –T–They are not required to follow that request

19 Limits to the Freedoms –T–These freedoms do not allow us to do things that would break the law. –T–The rights of the individual are what make this country great, but the rights of the majority take precedent.

20 Section Two Terms Define the following –S–Slander –T–Treason –L–Libel –p–petition

21 Chapter Four – The Bill of Rights Extended Section Three In 1791 the Bill of Rights did not apply to all people –W–Women –A–African Americans –C–Children under 21 The Civil War Amendments –1–13 th Amendment ended slavery (1865) Also, no forced labor except as punishment

22 Chapter Four – The Bill of Rights Extended Section Three The 14 th Amendment –D–Defined U.S. citizen as anyone born or naturalized in the United States –S–States forbidden from interfering with the privileges or immunities of citizens of U.S. States cannot take away rights granted by Federal Government –R–Required every state to grant equal protection of the laws

23 Chapter Four – The Bill of Rights Extended Section Three The 15 th Amendment –A–African American granted suffrage, or right to vote Poll tax Literacy test

24 Voting rights and elections –T–The 17 th Amendment Allowed citizens to elect Senators not state legislatures –T–The 19 th Amendment The Constitution did not grant suffrage to women, but it did not deny it either. It was up to the individual states. Certain states and territories allowed women to vote Wyoming the first state in 1869

25 Voting rights and elections –T–The 23 rd Amendment Allowed the residents of Washington D.C. to vote in national elections (1961) –Taxation without representation –T–The 24 th Amendment Eliminated the poll tax –T–The 26 th Amendment Lowered voting age from 21 to 18

26 Section Three Terms Define the following –S–Suffrage –P–Poll tax


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