Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects open in Internet.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects open in Internet."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects open in Internet Explorer and click on Slide Show at the bottom right browser window. To advance through the presentation, left-click the mouse or the press the space bar. From the resources slide, click on any resource to see a presentation for that resource. From the Chapter menu screen click on any lesson to go directly to that lessons presentation. You may exit the slide show at any time by pressing the Esc key. How to Use This Presentation

3 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Monday August 24 th Overview Seating Chart Bellwork: Information Card My Introduction to Class Classroom Rules Classroom Consequences Discipline Writing Procedure Materials for Class How to Enter the Classroom Procedure Being Prepared for Class Procedure Heading on Every Paper Procedure Attendance Procedure Tardy Procedure Getting Class Attention Procedure Hall Pass Procedure Pencil Sharpening Procedure Asking a Question Procedure End of Class Procedure Homework Procedure: using agenda to record assignments Homework: Memorize Student ID Number and bring $15 Lab money (Checks to Leon High School). Student photo on Wed. George Washington Carver Red Tails Homework: $15 Lab Expense, Notebook, Tabs, 2 pencils or pens, Memorize Student ID # August 18 th

4 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Dr. George Washington Carver featured Bellringer: Read the first page of the George Washington Carver Story and answer these questions: –What is George Washington Carver Most Famous For? –In the Second Paragraph, What do you think happened to Georges Mother? –What age was George when he started school? –Why didnt George go work in the fields with the others? –What was Georges attitude about nature? Fascinating Facts Tuskegee Institute founded by Booker T. Washington –Faculty Member –Later Home of the Tuskegee Airmen 332 Fighter Group known as the Red TailsRed Tails

5 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday August 25 th Overview Bellringer: George Washington Carver Story Questions See Extra Credit Projects Classwork: Getting to Know You; Introduction of Neighbor Lab Expense Collection Reinforce Getting Class Attention Procedure Introductions Course Syllabus Homework: Get Lab Fee in and Memorize Student ID, Sign last page of Syllabus, Join the List Serve, Label your notebook Tabs Appropriate to teacher My address: To be Covered Tomorrow Signing on my List Serve Set Up Notebook See how to Access Integrated Science Web Site See Chapter Resources available online Frame Notes: Scientific Method August 19 th

6 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Classwork Read Article on George Washington Carver Use Complete Sentences to Answer the Items below 3. Write Three Things that surprised you in this article 2. Write Two Things you already knew 1. Write One question that you still have Begin Going Over the Science Fair Requirements

7 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer Even before you started this course, you knew a lot about science because science and its effects surround everyone in our society. To help you tap this knowledge, answer the items below. 1. The term science encompasses many areas of study. Name four branches of science and briefly describe the topics that are studied in each. 2. Computer technology has changed the way many tasks are completed today. Name three other technological advances that have occurred since 1900 that have changed our lives significantly. 3. Scientific laws such as the law of gravity govern our daily lives. Name two additional laws of science that govern our lives. Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

8 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday August 26 th Overview Nature of Science Bellringer Hall Pass Miniature Earth Model related to USAs science and technology prowessMiniature Earth Model Lab Monies 4 th Hand in Medical Forms and Code of Conduct Checking Notebook and Dividers –Hand in Signed Syllabus Sheet Gradebook Procedure Begin Going Over the Science Fair RequirementsScience Fair More Introductions Homework: Lab Monies, Notebook, Calculator, Labeled Tabs August 20 th

9 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Chapter Presentation Bellringers Transparencies Standardized Test Prep Math Skills Visual Concepts Resources

10 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Integrated Science II Chapter 1: Introduction to Science Quiz Bowl Review Chapter 1 Helps English Text Section 1 Section 2 Section 3 Spanish Intro Text Spanish section 1 Spanish section 2 Spanish section 3

11 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer Your teacher has given you the following assignment: Investigate the impact on plant growth of adding various amounts of fertilizer to potted plants. Think about what you would need to do to be certain that the fertilizer was having the impact on the plant growth. Then answer the items below. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

12 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer: Fertilizer Plan Part I Write out the four items that would be part of your plan to investigate plant height and fertilizer. Do not write out the items that will not help you investigate this particular connection. a. _______ Put one plant in a sunny windowsill and one in a dark corner. b. _______ Give plants the same amounts of water. c. _______ Give different plants different amounts of fertilizer without keeping track of which plant got extra fertilizer. d. _______ Use some new plants from seeds and some old plants that have been growing for months. e. _______ Start with plants that are the same size. f. _______ Keep all plants in a similar location. g. _______ Carefully note amounts of fertilizer each plant is given. h. _______ Keep one plant fertilized but with no water. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

13 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Introduction to Science Chapter 1 Table of Contents Section 1 The Nature of Science Section 2 The Way Science Works Section 3 Organizing Data

14 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Extra Credit Reports (You may do only one) Report on Dr. George Washington Carver Fascinating Facts Fascinating Facts Report on The Tuskegee Airmen 332 Fighter Group better known as the Red TailsRed Tails Should Intelligent Design be taught as an alternative to Evolution Look up the definitions for Serendipity and Providence and Compare and Contrast their meanings and value to Science

15 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 The Nature of Science Objectives Describe the main branches of natural science and relate them to each other. Describe the relationship between science and technology. Distinguish between scientific laws and scientific theories. Explain the roles of models and mathematics in scientific theories and laws. Chapter 1

16 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Thursday August 27 th Overview Bellringer: Fertilizer Part I BINGOO Read GWC Quotes Lab Monies, Notebook, Tabs, Calculator, Pen or Pencils Continue Introductions Homework: George Washington Carver Quotes Late Homework: Lab Money, Syllabus Signature Sheet –4 th Period also needs Emergency Form and Code of Conduct Form August 21

17 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday September 1 st Overview Bellringer: Fertilizer Part I Books Handed Out HW: Prepared for Class Quiz on Monday –Have 2 Pencils or Pens –Notebook with 5 Dividers –Textbook –Agenda Book –Hall Pass Late Homework: Lab Money, Syllabus Signature Sheet –4 th Period also needs Emergency Form and Code of Conduct Form

18 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Homework: George Washington Carver Quotes George Washington Carver Quotes 1.Look at quote 1 and 12 and tell me in your own words how George Washington Carver (GWC) feels about education 2.Look at quote 3, 8,14 and 16 and tell me in your own words what GWC feels are the keys to success and what causes most failures. 3.What type of mind is describe in quote 5 and what type of mind should we develop in quote 13 and why. 4.Look at quote 2 and 15 and tell me in your own words how George Washington Carver (GWC) feels about hate. 5.Look at quote 4, 6, and 11 and tell me in your own words how George Washington Carver (GWC) feels about God. 6.Pick your favorite quote and tell how it speaks to you.

19 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer: Fertilizer Plan Part II 2. Name at least five tools or supplies you will need to perform this experiment. 3. What quantities will be measured, and what units will you use to record these measurements? When Finished, Get out Book, Pencils, Notebook, Dividers, Agenda, and Hall Pass for Daily Grade. Begin looking at the Scavenger Hunt Page and fill it out as you can. Finally, be sure to read pps 1-11 Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

20 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Friday August 28 th Overview Bellringer: Fertilizer Plan Part II Frame Routine: Nature of Science

21 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu How Does Science Take Place? Scientists investigate. Scientists plan experiments. Scientists observe. Scientists always test the results. Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

22 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu How Does Science Take Place? continued Science has many branches. Biological science is the science of living things. Physical science is the science of matter and energy. Earth science is the science of the Earth, the atmosphere, and weather. Science is the knowledge obtained by observing natural events and conditions in order to discover facts and formulate laws or principles that can be verified or tested. Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

23 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Natural Science Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

24 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Biology Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

25 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Physics Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

26 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Earth Sciences Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

27 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Monday August 31 st Overview Bellringer: 5 Milestones of GWC –from the Dr. George Washington Carver Fascinating Facts websiteFascinating Facts –Look at all the milestones and pick 5 that stand out for you and be able to tell why Hand Out Books Thieves today and tomorrow Homework: – Read Section 1 and Answers Odd Questions 1-9 on Page 11 in Complete Thoughts –Late Homeworks: Lab Fees, Syllabus Sign Page, Finish Scavenger Hunt

28 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu The Element of Thieves T=Title What is the title of Chapter 1 on page 2? What do I already know about the topic? What do I think I will be reading about? H=Headings What does the Green letter Heading on pages 4, 12, and 20 tell me I will be reading about? How can I turn these Headings into questions that are likely to be answered in the text? I=Introduction Look at the Focus activity on page 3. How does this page introduce the chapter? What do you think your grandparents would say was the scientific discovery that made the biggest difference in their lifetime? E=Every first sentence in a paragraph After reading the first sentence of each paragraph of section 1 on pages 4-11, what do I think this first section will be about? If time permits I will read the first sentence of each paragraph in sections 2 and 3. V=visuals and vocabulary How do the photographs, drawings, maps charts and graphs help me learn about this chapter? List the vocabulary words in the margins that you will need to know E=end-of-chapter questions While looking at the chapter review questions from pages 27-29, list 7 things that are important in this chapter. S=Summary After I review the summaries on pages 11, 19, 26 what do I understand and recall about thie topic covered in the summary?

29 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday September 1 st Overview Bellringer: The House Grade HW Show Grades Finish Notes on Section 1 Homework Answers Even Questions 2-8 on Page 11 in Complete Thoughts Tomorrow Classes meet in the Band Field

30 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu How Does Science Take Place? continued Science and technology work together. Some scientists practice pure science defined as the continuing search for scientific knowledge. Some scientists and engineers practice applied science defined as the search for ways to use scientific knowledge for practical applications. Technology is the application of science for practical purposes. Link to Frame Routine Section 1 a NotesFrame Routine Section 1 a Notes Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

31 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Laws and Theories Laws and theories are supported by experimental results. Scientific theories are always being questioned and examined. To be valid, a theory must: explain observations be repeatable be predictable Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

32 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Laws and Theories, continued Scientific law a summary of many experimental results and observations; a law tells how things work Scientific theory an explanation for some phenomenon that is based on observation, experimentation, and reasoning Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

33 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Comparing Theories and Laws Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

34 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Laws and Theories, continued Mathematics can describe physical events. A qualitative statement describes something with words. A quantitative statement describes something with mathematical equations. Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

35 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Laws and Theories, continued Theories and laws are always being tested. Models can represent physical events. A model is a representation of an object or event that can be studied to understand the real object or event. Scientists use physical and computer models to study objects and events. Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

36 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Models Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1

37 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Physical, Mathematical, and Conceptual Models Section 1 The Nature of Science Chapter 1 Link to Frame Routine Section 1 b Notes

38 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 2 nd Overview Pendulum Lab – Changing which variable give the most dramatic change in the Time it takes for the pendulum to return to its starting position after being released (called the Period) –Outcome: The Period (What we are interested in discovering) –Variables that we can change: String Length, Weight, or Drop Height –Test Variable: The one variable from the above list of variables that your group believes most affects the Period Time and you will change throughout the lab –Control Variable: The two remaining variables that you will keep the same throughout the Experiment Check HW Answers to SR p 11 Odd Questions Available online on the next slide

39 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Thursday September 3 rd Overview Bellringer: Complete Lab Notes from yesterday. Begin Lab Report Go over Section Reviews Answers Complete Notes on Section 1 Homework: Finish Lab Report –Be prepared for BINGOO on Section 1 –Section 1 Quiz on Tuesday Online Source of the Lab Report Handout –In a Word Document (I am not sure if you can access it) Click Here then click on the Lab Report with the Word Icon in front of it. me if you have any problems. Click Here me –As a Web PageWeb Page

40 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Answers to Section 1.1 Review Odd 1.Chemistry is the study of matter and its changes. Physics is the study of forces and energy and their interaction with matter. 3.A guess or opinion is usually an unsupported statement. A scientific theory is one that has been repeatedly tested through observations. 5.A law does not attempt to explain why something happens; a theory does 7.A model is used to study or make predictions about the object or situation the model represents. They are also used when an object or situation is too complex. 9.Answers will vary

41 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Answers to Section 1.1 Review Even 2.Technology is the application of science. Improving technology involves someone finding a use for a scientific discovery. However some scientific discoveries cannot be made until the technology for making the necessary observations exist. 4.A scientific law states a repeated observation about nature. 6.Quantitative descriptions use numbers. Qualitative descriptions do not. 8.Instead of being disappointed Roetengen decided to experiment to find out more about his failure.

42 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Friday September 4 th Overview Bellringer: Prepare to Hand in your Pendulum Lab –3 Hole punch paper –Staple Data Lab and Summary of Data page to Lab –Place Lab in Red Tray on top of Scanner 4 th period Hand out passwords Show effect of Lab and Quiz Grades –If you make a 100 on both most you will have an A and some will have Bs for the class –If everyone had a 40 on each, everyone would be failing –So be sure to study hard and do good. Play BINGOO Section Review Game Homework: Study for Quiz which will be in the Media Computer Lab

43 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday September 8 th Overview Login to the Computer –Call teacher over for assistance if you do not know login and password How to get to my website and how to get on the list serve Find Shortcut to Coon on Leon MS-10 on the Desktop –Click into it, Find the Test Folder and click into it –Click on Ch1.1quiz.eot Chapter 1.1 quiz –password bingoo Next do Short Final Exam.eot password final Google George Washington Carver or Roentgen for extra Credit report –Level I Game get it under 60 seconds before going to level II Homework: Read Section1.2 pp12-19 and Answer questions 2-5, 7 p.19 in complete thoughts

44 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 9 th Overview Bellringer: Write the notes about KWL from the Whiteboard and here KWL: K=Know (if you think you know but are not sure write in pencil not pen); W= What Questions do you Have; L = What did you Learn after you read it. –Scan pages in Green Book or Purple Book –Write a total of 10 things for the K and W sections before you read section (Can be 5 Ks and 5 Ws or can be 3 Ks and 7 Ws or any combination) –Read the pages, and write 10 things you learned from reading in the Learn Section, KWL and Begin Tonights Homework Last Nights Homework will be checked Tomorrow along with tonights Homework: (Section 1 Quiz Retake on Friday) –Section Review p. 19 #s 1,6 –Chapter Review p.27 #s 4, 5, 9 Begin Section 1.2 Notes

45 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer Place a Y besides items that would be part of your plan to investigate plant height and fertilizer. Place a N besides items that will not help you investigate this particular connection. a. _______ Put one plant in a sunny windowsill and one in a dark corner. b. _______ Give plants the same amounts of water. c. _______ Give different plants different amounts of fertilizer without keeping track of which plant got extra fertilizer. d. _______ Use some new plants from seeds and some old plants that have been growing for months. e. _______ Start with plants that are the same size. f. _______ Keep all plants in a similar location. g. _______ Carefully note amounts of fertilizer each plant is given. h. _______ Keep one plant fertilized but with no water. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

46 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer 2. Name at least five tools or supplies you will need to perform this experiment. 3. What quantities will be measured, and what units will you use to record these measurements? If you finish this early, be sure that Scavenger Hunt (Whole Book) and Element of Thieves (Chapter 1) Handouts are done from Friday Get out Book, Pencils, Notebook, Dividers, Agenda, Hall Pass and Above Handouts for Be Prepared Quiz. Next Read pp 8-11 starting with Mathematics can describe physical events heading Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

47 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Units of Measurement SI units are used for consistency. Scientists use the International System of Units (SI) to make sharing data and results easier. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

48 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Thursday September 10 th Overview Bellringer: Copy SI Base Units Table 1-1 p 16 (slide 47), and Common SI Units (slide 48) Review Homework Scientific Method King Henry Died bye Drinking Chocolate Milk Even Number problems p 17 if time Homework: Work the odd practice problems on page 17 And Read the Science Project Help Book

49 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Answers to 1.2 Section Review 1.Things that are commonly measured by a.Mass: solid food items, people, and mail; b.Volume: liquid food items, gasoline, air flow (exhausts fans and a/c units); c.Length: rope, distance, height. 2.Scientific method is similar to critical thinking in that both involve thinking about a problem and checking details. 3.A hypothesis is a possible answer to a question that can be tested. An example: I can pass the test if I study at least 5 hours. 4.No experiment should be called a failure because an experiment that has unexpected results provides a chance to learn something new. 5.Even now, there are scientific theories which have not been verified. In some cases these theories cannot be tested because the tools do not yet exists. 6.An SI base unit is a single unit while a derived unit is a combination fo the base units. Base units include: seconds, meters, kilograms, kelvin, amperes, moles, and candelas. Examples of derived units are meters cubed (m 3 ) or the newton (N), which is a kg*m/s 2. 7.It is much easier to determine which factor your experiment depends on if you only check one factor at a time. If you change more than one thing and something unexpected happens, you will not know what caused the result.

50 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Method Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

51 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 The Way Science Works Objectives Understand how to use critical thinking skills to solve problems. Describe the steps of the scientific method. Know some of the tools scientists use to investigate nature. Explain the objective of a consistent system of units, and identify the SI units for length, mass, and time. Identify what each common SI prefix represents, and convert measurements. Chapter 1

52 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Units of Measurement, continued The table below shows SI prefixes for small measurements. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

53 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Units of Measurement, continued SI prefixes are for very large and very small measurements. The table below shows SI prefixes for large measurements. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

54 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Conversion Shortcut King Henry Died (Bye) Drinking Chocolate Milk khdadcm 1.6kg 5.1cA 550mm

55 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Conversion Shortcut King Henry Died (Bye) Drinking Chocolate khdadcm 1.6 kg16 hg.51 dA5.1 cA 550mm Move one decimal to the right to get the box one place to the right Move one decimal to the left to get the box one place to the left The number of spaces you move is the amount you change the decimal

56 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Conversions p 17 1.Write 550 millimeters as meters. 2.Write 3.5 seconds as milliseconds 3.Convert 1.6 kilograms to grams 4.Convert 2500 milligrams to kilograms 5.Convert 4.00 centimeters to micrometers 6.Change 2800 millimoles to moles 7.Change 6.1 amperes to milliamperes 8.Write 3 micrograms as nanograms.

57 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Conversion Shortcut Write in Bellringer Section khdadcm 550 mm 1.6 kg 6.1 amps

58 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Conversion Shortcut Write in Bellringer Section khdadcm 3.5 s 2500 mg 2800 mmol

59 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Conversion Shortcut Answers khdadcm 1.6 kg16 hg160 dag 1600 g dg cg mg kA hA daA A0.51 dA5.1 cA51 mA 550mm

60 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Friday September 11 th Overview Bellringer: Look at 1 st page of Science Project Help Book –Put stars by the Topic Categories you find the most interesting How to exit a computer test –You must use the exit button –Raise your hand –Have teacher record your score Ch 1. Section 1 Retake password xray Science Fair Packet read Frequently Asked Questions and Tips for Completing Your ProjectScience Fair Packet Possible Science Fair Questions Sample Research Paper Research Paper Outline Discuss with your teacher what you would like to research and with his approval, start to Google it.

61 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Monday September 14 th Overview Bellringer: Check your work to Practice on page 17 – be sure to include units m ms g kg μm mol mA ng Lab Notes on Experiments Be sure you understand how to conduct an experiment Brainstorm ideas on Science Fair questions –Be ambitious (infrared bee project) –No elementary school projects Research Lesson Wednesday in Media Center Homework: Have a science fair question ready for class tomorrow

62 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Science Skills for Science Fair Critical Thinking Scientists approach a problem by thinking logically. Critical thinking is the ability and willingness to assess claims critically and to make judgments on the basis of objective and supported reasons. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

63 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Science Skills, continued Using the scientific method The scientific method is a general description of scientific thinking rather than an exact path for scientists to follow. Scientific method a series of steps followed to solve problems including collecting data, formulating a hypothesis, testing the hypothesis, and stating conclusions Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

64 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Science Skills, continued Hypothesis a possible explanation or answer that can be tested Testing hypotheses Scientists test a hypothesis by doing a controlled experiment. In a controlled experiment, all the factors that could affect the experiment are kept constant except for one change. Variable a factor that changes in an experiment in order to test a hypothesis Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

65 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Hypothesis Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

66 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Controlled Experiment and Variable Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

67 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu SI (Le Système Internationale dUnités) Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

68 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Science Skills, continued Conducting experiments No experiment is a failure The results of every experiment can be used to revise the hypothesis or plan tests of a different variable. Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

69 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Science Skills, continued Using scientific tools There are many tools used by scientists for making observations, including Microscopes (light and electron) Telescopes (light, radio, infrared) spectroscopes particle accelerators computers Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

70 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Friday August 31 st Overview Leaf Blower demonstration Bellringer: Draw the Conversion Shortcut Table Go Over Fire Drill Procedure 4 th Period Fire Drill Work the Conversion Shortcut Table as a group Go over page 17 using Shortcut Table Begin Units of Measure 1.2 Notes Review Certain Classroom procedures Homework: Have a great weekend

71 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Conversions A roll of copper wire contains 15 m of wire. What is the length of the wire in centimeters? 1. List the given and unknown values. Given: length in meters, l = 15 m Unknown: length in centimeters = ? cm Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

72 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills 2. Determine the relationship between units. Looking at the table of prefixes used for small measurements, you can find that 1 cm = 0.01 m. This also means that 1 m = 100 cm. You will multiply because you are converting from a larger unit (meters) to a smaller unit (centimeters) 3. Write the equation for the conversion. length in cm = m Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

73 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills 4. Insert the known values into the equation, and solve. length in cm = 15 m length in cm = 1500 cm Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

74 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer: Interpreting and Graphing Fertilizer Data Imagine your teacher asked you to study how providing different amounts of fertilizer affected the heights of plants. You perform a study and collect the data shown in the table below. Use this data to answer the items that follow. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

75 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bellringer, continued 1. Which amount of fertilizer produced the tallest plants? 2. Which amount of fertilizer produced the smallest plants? 3. Plot the data on a grid like the one below. 4. Describe the overall trend as more fertilizer is added to the plants. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

76 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday September 15 th Overview Bellringer: Interpreting and Graphing Fertilizer Data Classwork: KWL pp Each Student is to discuss with teacher their Science Fair Idea and be prepared to research topic tomorrow Cherrydale Fundraising Opportunity Homework: –Read Section1.3 pp20-26 –SR p26 1-4

77 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 16 th Overview Bellringer: Citing Resources Login find the Media link on the Leon Website Find the Resources link and use E-Library to discover articles or books for your science fair projects. Homework: Be sure you have a good Science Fair question for research

78 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Thursday September 17 th Overview Bellringer: Scan pages 20 – top 26; : KWL: K=Know (if you think you know but are not sure write in pencil not pen); W= What you Want to Know; L = What did you Learn after you read it. –Write a total of 10 things for the K and W sections before you read section –Read the pages, and write 10 most important things you learned from the reading Review Fertilizer Data Plot Engineering Science Fair Option- Problem instead of Question then Engineering Goal instead of Hypothesis Math Skills using Block Diagram Method Go over answers to 1.3 Section Review SR p Homework –SR p 26 #s 5-7

79 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Units of Measurement, continued Making measurements Many observations rely on quantitative measurements. Length a measure of the straight-line distance between two points Volume a measure of the size of a body or region in three-dimensional space Mass a measure of the amount of matter in an object Weight a measure of the gravitational force exerted on an object Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

80 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Volume Section 2 The Way Science Works Chapter 1

81 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Friday September 18 th Overview Login to the Computer –Call teacher over for assistance if you do not know login and password Click on and practice ch_1_section_2_review ch_1_section_2_review Check Homework next slide Continue working with Ms. David on Bibliographies –We need to have Four Sources per person plus the International Science Fair Rules and Guidelines site Extra Credit Homework: Go to Challenger Learning Center for Free IMAX and Planetarium from 10 AM to 4 PM. Write a paragraph for each thing you see including demos If you have not taken the retake on Section 1 you may do so now –Open Ch1.1 retake.eot –Password xray Go to the Free Day at Challenger Learning Center from 10 AM to 4 PM and write a paragraph on each of your experiences (1 point for IMAX; 1 point for Planetarium; 1 Point for Demonstrations ames/ptablegames.htmlhttp://chemistry2.csudh.edu/ptableg ames/ptablegames.html –Level I Game get it under 60 seconds before going to level II –Level II game get it under 100 seconds before going to level III

82 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu SR 1.3 p26 #s1-4 1.Line graphs are best for continuous changes. 2.Pie charts show the parts of a whole. An example is the percentages of types of CDs that make up a collection 3.Accuracy is how close a measurement is to being correct. Precision is how small the smallest unit of measurement is. 4.The correct answer is that both weigh the same. A reason for an incorrect answer might be that the batch of feathers would be much lighter than the same-sized piece of lead.

83 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Monday September 21 st Overview Correct Pendulum Lab for ½ credit See Grades on Easy Grade Pro Math using Block Diagram Method BINGOO Review Homework: Finish Lab Corrections and turn in –Quiz on Ch 1 Section 2 tomorrow (last grade before progress reports)

84 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Block Diagram Method Armando stepped on the scale in his doctors office and found out that his mass is 35 kg. What is his mass in grams? g 35 kg kg g

85 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Sheet Conversions L/y = ? mL/month 64 times 1000 divided by 12 = 5,333 mL/mo 64 L y L mL y mo 1 12

86 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu 1 Math Skills SheetMath Skills Sheet On March 24, 1989, the Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska Spilling 37,854,120 L of crude oil. What is the volume in milliliters?

87 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Sheet Conversions kg = ? Mg s = ? ms 1000m = ? cm 4.5 µg = ?g m = ?km

88 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Sheet Conversions s = ?ks 100m = ?km 7.100mA = ?A m = ?km cm = ?m

89 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Sheet Conversions 11. The purpose of the sport called flight archery is to shoot an arrow the greatest possible distance. On of the greatest distance achieved was 624 m. What is the distance in centimeters?

90 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Sheet Conversions m 2 = ?km 2 Hint: How many m 2 = km 2 To figure out the hint, look at square inches from square feet How many inches in a foot? –12 Then How many square inches in a square foot? –144 which is 12 squared How many meters in a kilometer? –1000 How many square meters in a square kilometer? –Now square the 1000 meters so there is square meters in a square kilometer

91 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tricky when converting from Metric to English How much is 25 cm in inches? Conversion factor 2.54 cm = 1 in Divide 25 by 2.54 = 9.84 in. 25 cm cm in

92 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday September 22 nd Overview Login to the Computer –Call teacher over for assistance if you do not know login and password Take Ch 1 Section 2 Quiz password nano If you have not taken Chapter 1.1 quiz or the 1.1 Retake you may do so now –Ch 1 Section 1 Quiz password bingoo –Ch1 Section 1 retake.eot password xray When finished quiz, go to my website, click on Form 1A and Research Plan link (bottom right) and fill out as much as you know. Save it to youre My Documents folderForm 1A and Research Plan Bernoullis Principal Leaf Blower Lab October Sky Movie during my absence with its Quiz on Tuesday My Expectations for my Class with a Substitute Teacher

93 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Plotting Data Imagine your teacher asked you to study how providing different amounts of fertilizer affected the heights of plants. You perform a study and collect the data shown in the table above. Use this data to answer the items that follow. 1. Which amount of fertilizer produced the tallest plants? 2. Which amount of fertilizer produced the smallest plants? 3. Plot the data on a grid like the one to the left. 4. Describe the overall trend as more fertilizer is added to the plants.

94 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday – Monday Overview September 23 rd - 28 th Watch October Sky ( A movie with a Science Fair Theme) and fill out the Movie Study GuideMovie Study Guide Treat the Substitute Teacher with Respect Friday Review answers after Movie Monday continue Review Be prepared for a Quiz or Test on October Sky Movie Tuesday Cherry Dale Fundraiser Due tomorrow Homework: Continue to locate sources for your Science Fair Research. Be ready to complete Bibliography on Tuesday in Computer Lab

95 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Plotting Data Imagine your teacher asked you to study how providing different amounts of fertilizer affected the heights of plants. You perform a study and collect the data shown in the table above. Use this data to answer the items that follow. 1. Which amount of fertilizer produced the tallest plants? 2. Which amount of fertilizer produced the smallest plants? 3. Plot the data on a grid like the one to the left. 4. Describe the overall trend as more fertilizer is added to the plants.

96 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 5 th Overview Bellringer: Fertilizer Data Begin 1.3 Notes Take up 4 th and 6 th Notebooks Homework SR 5-7 p 26

97 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 3 Organizing Data Objectives Interpret line graphs, bar graphs, and pie charts. Use scientific notation and significant figures in problem solving. Identify the significant figures in calculations. Understand the difference between precision and accuracy. Chapter 1

98 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday September 29 th Overview Login to the Computer –Call teacher over for assistance if you do not know login and password Go to the Test Folder inside of Coon on leon-ms10 folder and take the October Sky Movie Test password sputnik Continue working with Ms. David on Bibliographies –If you finish today receive an extra 10 points – tomorrow 5 points –Due by Thursday – Friday minus 5 points –We need to have Four Sources per person plus the International Science Fair Rules and Guidelines site If you have not taken the retake on Section 1 you may do so now –Open Ch1.1 retake.eot –Password xray –Level I Game get it under 60 seconds before going to level II –Level II game get it under 100 seconds before going to level III

99 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 30 th Overview Bellringer : Making and Interpreting Bar and Pie GraphsMaking and Interpreting Bar and Pie Graphs Show Grades Turn in CherryDale Fundraising Material Practice p 23 Writing Scientific Notation (Extra Practice)Extra Practice Practice p 24 Using Scientific Notation Practice p 25 Significant Figures (Extra Practice)Extra Practice Homework: –Complete the Study Guide 1.3 (on the backside of the Bar and Pie Graphs page)Study Guide 1.3 –Turn in Bibliography on Science Fair Topic

100 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Thursday October 1 st Overview Bellringer: Making a Line GraphMaking a Line Graph Turn in your Science Fair Bibliography All Fundraising Material in by Tuesday Class Work: Deciding Which Type of Graph is AppropriateDeciding Which Type of Graph is Appropriate Correct Last nights homework Significant Figures Homework: Practice p 25 #s 1-4

101 Practice p 24 1,2 Using Scientific Notation 1.Perform the following calculations. a.(5.5 x 10 4 cm) x (1.4 x 10 4 cm) b.(2.77 x m) x (3.29 x m) c.(4.34 g/mL) x (8.22 x 10 6 mL) d.(3.8 x cm) x (4.4 x cm) x (7.5 x cm) 2.Perform the following calculations. a. b. c. d.

102 Friday October 2 nd Overview Bellringer: Practice p 24 1, 2 Hand in Bibliography for – 5 Classwork: Notes and Practice p 23 Homework: Get your Bibliography in if you havent!!!

103 1 a-c Worked a.(5.5 x 10 4 cm) x (1.4 x 10 4 cm) =(5.5 x 1.4) x (10 4 x 10 4 ) x (cm x cm) =7.7 x cm 2 = 7.7 x 10 8 cm 2 b.(2.77 x m) x (3.29 x m) =(2.77 x 3.29) x (10 -5 x ) x (m x m) = x m 2 = 9.11 x m 2 c.(4.34 g/mL) x (8.22 x 10 6 mL) =(4.34 x 8.22) x (10 0 x 10 6 ) x (g/mL x mL) = x ( ) (g/mL x mL/1) =35.7 x 10 6 g = 3.57 x 10 7 g

104 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Practice p 24 Using Scientific Notation 1.Perform the following calculations. a.(5.5 x 10 4 cm) x (1.4 x 10 4 cm) = (5.5 x 1.4) x ( ) x (cm x cm) = 7.7 x 10 8 cm 2 b.(2.77 x m) x (3.29 x m) = (2.77 x 3.29) x ( ) x (m x m) = 9.11 x m 2 c.(4.34 g/mL) x (8.22 x 10 6 mL) = (4.34 x 8.22) x ( ) x (g/mL x mL) = 35.7 x 10 6 mL = 3.57 x 10 7 g d.(3.8 x cm) x (4.4 x cm) x (7.5 x cm)

105 2a, d from Practice

106 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Practice p 24 Using Scientific Notation 2.Perform the following calculations. a.(3.0 x 10 4 L) ÷ 62s = (3.0 x 10 4 L) ÷ (6.2 x 10 1 s) = (3.0 ÷ 6.2) x ( ) x (L ÷ s) = 0.5 x 10 3 L/s = 5.0 x 10 2 L/s b.(6.05 x 10 7 g ) ÷ (8.8 x 10 6 cm 3 ) = (6.05 ÷ 8.8) x (10 7 ÷ 10 6 ) (g ÷ cm 3 ) = x ( ) g/cm 3 = 0.69 x 10 1 g/cm 3 = 6.9 g/cm 3 c.(5.2 x 10 8 cm 3 ) ÷ (9.5 x 10 2 cm) = (5.2 ÷ 9.5) x ( ) (cm 3 /cm) = 5.5 x 10 5 cm 2

107 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Notation Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

108 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Writing Numbers in Scientific Notation Scientific notation is a method of expressing a quantity as a number multiplied by 10 to the appropriate power. Some powers of 10 and their decimal equivalents are shown to the right. Coons Rule: The power of 10 represents how far you move the decimal from its current position –Positive powers move the decimal to the right –Negative powers move the decimal to the left. The zero power doesnt move the decimal at all = = = = = = = x 10 3 = x = Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

109 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Practice p 23 1,2 Writing Scientific Notation 1.Write the following measurements in scientific notation: a m b kg c L d m e km f kg 2.Write the following measurements in long form: a.4.5 x 10 3 g b.6.05 x m c x 10 6 km d.1.99 x cm = 4500 g = m = km = cm = 8.0 x 10 8 m = 1.5 x kg = 6.02 x 10 4 L = 9.5 x m = x 10 6 km = 6.0 x kg

110 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Writing Numbers in Scientific Notation, continued Using scientific notation When you use scientific notation in calculations, you follow the math rules for powers of 10. When you multiply two values in scientific notation, you add the powers of 10. When you divide, you subtract the powers of 10. Click on Slide Show on the Lower Left of Screen before proceeding to next slide Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

111 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Now Prepare to do the Quizzes Find Shortcut to Coon on Leon MS-10 on the Desktop –Click into it, Find the Test Folder and click into it –Click on Ch1.3quiz.eot Chapter 1.3 quiz –password data –Press end button when done Chapter 1 Review –After completing 1.3 Quiz click on New –Click on Chapter 1 Review –Password review –You may do this quiz as many times as you can to get a great grade and prepare for the Test on Wednesday When finished, Watch the Spaceport Video using your headphonesVideo

112 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Monday September 15 th Overview Finish October Sky Movie and Study GuideStudy Guide Homework: Mixed Review SheetSheet –Test on Wednesday: Chapter 1 (35% of Grade) –Quiz on October Sky Movie from Study Guide Go over the rest of the Slides for this Chapter before the Test. Find questions you need to ask me for the review. Additional Chapter Study Guide from Internet. See how you would do.from Internet Additional Chapter Review from Internet.from Internet.

113 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday September 16 th Overview Bellringer: Chapter Review p 27 #s 1-12 Checking Mixed Review Homework Significant Figures Poker Review Chapter Test Wednesday Homework is Study for the Test –Review notes –Check homework –Go over Mixed Review –Additional Chapter Study Guide from Internet. See how you would do.from Internet –Additional Chapter Review from Internet.from Internet

114 CR p27 # 13 Graph Time (min) Temperature (°C ) 1112 a.What is the highest temperature reached during the reaction? b.How many minutes passed before the highest temperature was reached? c.During what period of time was the temperature increasing at a near steady rate? d.Which occurred more slowly, heating or cooling?

115 Monday, October 5 th Overview Bellringer: Answer Chapter Review Question # 13 p 27 Precision vs. Accuracy Notes Bibliography overdue Homework: CR p 27 #s 6-8, 12, 14, 15-17

116 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Answers CR p 27 #13 a.Highest Temp reached at 69° C from book (or 70 ° C from slide) b.3 minutes passed till highest temp. reached c.The first 3 minutes increased at near steady state d.Cooling occurred more slowly

117 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Significant Figures Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

118 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Using Significant Figures Significant figure a prescribed decimal place that determines the amount of rounding off to be done based on the precision of the measurement Precision and accuracy Precision the exactness of a measurement Accuracy a description of how close a measurement is to the true value of the quantity measured Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

119 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Using Significant Figures, continued When you use measurements in calculations, the answer is only as precise as the least precise measurement used in the calculation. The measurement with the fewest significant figures determines the number of significant figures that can be used in the answer. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

120 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Accuracy and Precision, part 1 Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

121 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Accuracy and Precision, part 2 Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

122 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Accuracy and Precision Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

123 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Presenting Scientific Data Line graphs are best for continuous change. Line graphs are usually made with the x-axis showing the independent variable and the y-axis showing the dependent variable. The values of the dependent variable depend on what happens in the experiment. The values of the independent variable are set before the experiment takes place. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

124 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Line Graph Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

125 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 10 th Overview Read Worlds Biggest Scientific Experiment articleWorlds Biggest Scientific Experiment Finish Plant Fertilizer Data Chart Practice p 23 Writing Scientific Notation Practice p 24 Using Scientific Notation Practice p 25 Significant Figures Answers to HW Homework: Quiz tomorrow in Media Lab –Study Guide 1.3Study Guide 1.3

126 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Presenting Scientific Data, continued Bar graphs compare items. A bar graph is useful for comparing similar data for several individual items or events. A bar graph can make clearer how large or small the differences in individual values are. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

127 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Bar Graph Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

128 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Presenting Scientific Data, continued Pie charts show parts of a whole. A pie chart is ideal for displaying data that are parts of a whole. Data in a pie chart is presented as a percent. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

129 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 17 th Overview Media Computer Lab Login to the Computer –Call teacher over for assistance if you do not know login and password Find Shortcut to Coon on Leon MS-10 on the Desktop –Click into it, Find the Test Folder and click into it –Click on Chapter_1_Test.eot Chapter 1 Test –password Carver When finished, Click Next and do October Sky October Sky Quiz –Password Sputnik Find Leon High School Shortcut and open it –See your grades by clicking on Online Grades –Login ID is your student ID and the password was given to you by your 2 nd period teacher (come to me to get it if you dont have it) Check for missing Quiz or Test Scores Ch1.1retake.eot –Password retake Chapter 1.2 quiz –password big bang Chapter 1.3 quiz –password data Chapter 1 Review –Password review –You may do this quiz as many times as you can to get a great grade and prepare for the Test on Wednesday Next be sure you finished Sample Final Exam.eot password final Go to my website and Chapter 1 slide 107 games.htmlhttp://chemistry2.csudh.edu/ptablegames/ptable games.html –Level I Game get it under 60 seconds before going to level II –Level II game get it under 100 seconds before going to level III Reread Worlds Biggest Scientific Experiment article and Google more about it for extra credit.Worlds Biggest Scientific Experiment Google George Washington Carver or Roentgen for extra Credit report

130 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Writing Scientific Notation The adult human heart pumps about L of blood each day. Write this value in scientific notation. 1. List the given and unknown values. Given: volume, V = L Unknown: volume, V = ? x 10 ? L Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

131 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills, continued 2. Write the form for scientific notation. V = ? x 10 ? L 3. Insert the known values into the form, and solve. First find the largest power of 10 that will divide into the known value and leave one digit before the decimal point. You get 1.8 if you divide into L. So, L can be written as (1.8 x ) L Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

132 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills, continued Then write as a power of 10. Because = 10 4, you can write L as 1.8 x 10 4 L. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1 V = 1.8 x 10 4 L

133 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Using Scientific Notation Your state plans to buy a rectangular tract of land measuring 5.36 x 10 3 m by 1.38 x 10 4 m to establish a nature preserve. What is the area of this tract in square meters? 1. List the given and unknown values. Given: length, l = 1.38 x 10 4 m width, w = 5.36 x 10 3 m Unknown: area, A = ? m 2 Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

134 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills, continued 2. Write the equation for area. A = l w 3. Insert the known values into the equation, and solve. A = ( m) ( m) Regroup the values and units as follows. A = ( ) ( ) (m m) When multiplying, add the powers of 10. A = ( ) ( ) (m m) A = m 2 A = m 2 Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

135 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills Significant Figures Calculate the volume of a room that is m high, 4.25 m wide, and 5.75 m long. Write the answer with the correct number of significant figures. 1. List the given and unknown values. Given: length, l = 5.75 m width, w = 4.25 m height, h = m Unknown: Volume, V = ? m 3 Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

136 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Skills, continued 2. Write the equation for volume. V = l w h 3. Insert the known values into the equation, and solve. V = 5.75 m 4.25 m m V = m 3 The answer should have three significant figures, because the value with the smallest number of significant figures has three significant figures. Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1 V = 76.4 m 3

137 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu SR 1.3 p 26 questions Convert the following measurements to scientific notation: a.15,400 mm 3 = 1.54 x 10 4 mm 3 b kg = 3.3 x kg c mL = 2.05 x 10 3 mL d mol = 1.5 x mol 6.Calculate the following: a. 3.16x10 3 m x 2.91x10 4 m = 9.20 x 10 7 m 2 b. 1.85x10 -3 cm x 5.22x10 -2 cm = 9.66 x cm 2 c. 9.04x10 5 g ÷ 1.35x10 5 cm 3 = 6.70 g/cm 3 7.Calculate the following, and round the answer to the correct number of significant figures. a. 54.2cm 2 x 22 cm = 1200 cm 3 b.23,500m ÷ 89s = 260 m/s

138 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Answers to Practice p 23 1,2 1.Write the following measurements in scientific notation: a m = 8.0 x 10 8 m b kg = 1.5 x kg c L = 6.02 x 10 4 L d m = 9.5 x m e km = x 10 6 km f kg = 6.0 x kg 2.Write the following measurements in long form: a.4.5 x 10 3 g = g b.6.05 x m = m c x 10 6 km = km d.1.99 x cm = cm

139 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Notation Shortcuts One shortcut involves numbers larger than 9. –Move the decimal point to the left and count the number of places it is moved until you get only one number to the left of the decimal. –To change to 1.8 in the previous example, the decimal point is moved four places. The number of places the decimal is moved is the correct power of L = 1.8 x 10 4 L The other shortcut is for numbers smaller than 1. –When a quantity smaller than 1 is converted to scientific notation, the decimal moves to the right and the power of 10 is negative. –Suppose an E. Coli bacterium is measured to be m long. To express this measurement in scientific notation, move the decimal point to the right six spaces m = 2.1 x m

140 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Tuesday, October 6 th Overview Bellringer: Writing Scientific Notation / Using Scientific NotationWriting Scientific Notation Using Scientific Notation Go Over Homework Answers BINGOO Review Homework: Study for Section 1.3 Quiz tomorrow End of the Fundraiser – Return the forms and money Bibliography Rubric: 50 Points Total –Heading an d Name(s) 5 points –Early/Late10 points –Intel R & G site 5 points –Enough Sources 5 points –MLA Format 25 points

141 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday October 7 th Overview Media Computer Lab Login to the Computer –Call teacher over for assistance if you do not know login and password Go to Coon on Leon MS 10 folder –Click on Tests Folder –Select Ch 1 Section 3 Quiz –Put in your name & Student ID –Password is data –Minus 5 points if you need the paper test Correct your Bibliography and resubmit it for full credit Find Leon High School Shortcut and open it –See your grades by clicking on Online Grades –Login ID is your student ID and the password was given to you by your 4 th period teacher (come to me to get it if you dont have it) –See if you are missing any quizzes or the Bibliography –Make up your work now Chapter Test on Tuesday Chapter Test Study Guide

142 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Chapter 1: Review Sheet Section 1: Describe the main branches of natural science and relate them to each other. Describe the relationship between science and technology. Distinguish between scientific laws and scientific theories. Explain the roles of models and mathematics in scientific theories and laws. Section 2: Understand how to use critical thinking skills to solve problems. Describe the steps of the scientific method. Know some of the tools scientists use to investigate nature. Explain the objective of a consistent system of units, and identify the SI units for length, mass, and time. Identify what each common SI prefix represents, and convert measurements. Section 3: Interpret line graphs, bar graphs, and pie charts Use scientific notation and significant figures in problem solving. Identify the significant figures in calculations. Understand the difference between precision and accuracy.

143 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu CR p 27 6,7,12, 6.The quantity 5.85 x 10 4 m is equivalent to ________ a m b m c m d m 7.Which of the following measurements has two significant figures? a g b.500 mL c km d.2.3 cm

144 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu 7.Which of the following measurements has two significant figures? a g b.500 mL c km d.2.3 cm

145 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu CR p Scientific Notation Write the following measurements in scientific notation: a mg b km c m d kg 16.Scientific Notation Do the following calculations, and write the answers in scientific notation: a x b ÷ 486 c.4.6 x 10 4 cm x 7.5 x 10 3 cm d.8.3 x 10 4 kg ÷ 2.5 x 10 9 cm Significant Figures Do the following calculations, and write the answers with the correct number of significant figures: a m x 8.45 m b.5650 L ÷ 27 min c km x km d.6271 m ÷ 59.7 s e.3.5 x 10 3 x2.11 x 10 4

146 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Notation Practice (Basic Skill 2.2)Basic Skill Humans can hear sounds with frequencies up to Hz, while dolphins can hear sounds as high as Hz. Write these numbers in scientific notation. 2.In meteorology, cm/h of precipitation is a mist, while 0.02 cm/h of precipitation is a drizzle. Write these numbers in scientific notation. 3.Express the area and average depth of the Pacific Ocean in scientific notation. The area is km 2, and the average depth is 4200 m. 4.Write 1.47 x 10 3 m/s, the speed of sound in water, in standard notation. 5.Write the diameter of an atom, 1x10 -8 cm, in standard notation.

147 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu 12.The volume of a bottle has been measured to be 485 mL. Use the terms significant figures, accuracy, and precision to explain what this tells you about the way volume was measured.

148 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu CR p27 8, 13, 14 8.The composition of the mixture of gases that makes up our air is best represented on what kind of graph? a.Pie chart b.Bar graph c.Line graph d.Variable graph 13.Graphing The graph on the next slide shows the changes in temperature during a chemical reaction. Study the graph and answer the following questions: a.What was the highest temperature reached during the reaction? b.How many minutes passed before the hightest temperature was reached c.During What period of time was the termperature increasing at a steady rate? d.Which occurred more slowly, heating or cooling? 14.Graphing Silver solder is a mixture of 40% silver, 40% tin, 14% copper, and 6% zinc. Draw a graph that shows the composition of silver solder.

149 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Dividing with Scientific Notation (Math Skills Sheet)Math Skills Sheet In order for an object such as a satellite to continue orbiting the earth, it must travel at least 7.8 x 10 3 m/s. Suppose an object was observed traveling 9.39 x 10 4 m in 1.20 x 10 2 s. Would the object continue to orbit or burn up reentering the atmosphere? 1.List the given and unknown values Given: distance, d = 9.39 x 10 4 m time, t = 1.20 x 10 2 s 2.Write the Equation for velocity. v = d ÷ t 3.Insert the known values into the equation and solve v = (9.39 x 10 4 m) ÷ (1.20 x 10 2 s ) Regroup the values and units as follows v = (9.39 ÷ 1.20)(10 4 ÷ 10 2 )(m ÷ s) When dividing, subtract the powers of 10. v = (9.39 ÷ 1.20)( )(m/s) v = x 10 2 m/s (Is this rounded to the right number of significant figures?) v = ?

150 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Thursday September 18 th Overview Bellringer: Questions 5 and 6 from Math ReviewReview Test Tomorrow For Up to 15 points of Extra Credit: From memory or with the help of your Math book or teacher, write down a workable set of rules for adding and subtracting using scientific notation

151 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Power of 10 Internet Link Bellringer: As you watch each time the picture zooms in 10Xs or zooms out 10Xs write three things you found the most surprising about the changes. This link examines the Powers of 10 as it takes us from deep in space down into the smallest part known of an atom u/powersof10/http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceoptics u/powersof10/

152 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Thursday September 18 th Overview Computer Lab Bellringer: Powers of Ten – 3 Surprises Read About the Science and Engineering FairScience and Engineering Fair Begin to get your notebook in order Homework/Classwork: –Design an Experiment for One Liter Bottled Water Rockets, where you determine the best amount of water to add to get the greatest height. All rockets will be pumped to the same pressure of air (90psi) and you will have 10 launches to discover the best amount of water. Place your design in the Lab section of the Notebook. –Finish getting Notebook in Order

153 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Notebook Rubric Prd: ___ Name:____________ Score: ___ Syllabus in Front Bellringer Tab –8/18 Be Sure you turned in 5 by 8 information Card –8/19 Four Sciences, 3 Technologies, 2 Laws –819 George Washington Carver Questions –8/21 George Washington Carver Quotes –8/26 Fertilizer Experiment Part 1 –8/27 Fertilizer Experiment Part 2 –9/3 KWL pp Section 1.2 –9/4 SI Tables –9/5 Conversion Shortcut / King Henry –9/9 KWL pp Section 1.3 –9/16 Chapter Review p Each Item is 3 points for having it Add 10 points for Paying the Lab Fee Homework Tab –Be sure Syllabus page is turned in, Lab Expense –8/27 Section 1.1; SR p 11; Odd questions 1-9 –8/28 Section 1.1; SR p 11; Even questions 1-9 –9/2 Section 1.2; SR p 19; #s 2-5, 7 –9/3 Section 1.2; SR p 19 #s 1, 6; CR p 27 # 4, 5, 9 –9/4 Odd Problems p 17 –9/5 Study Guide Section 1.2 –9/8 SR p –9/9 SR p –9/10 Study Guide Section 1.3 Notes Tab –8/19 George Washington Carver 3, 2, 1 –8/20 Frame Routine 1.1 Nature of Science –9/5 Even Problems p 17 –9/5 Scientific Method Diagram –9/9 Fertilizer vs. Height Graph –9/10 Practice p 23 #s 1, 2 Lab Tab (Empty) Handout Tab –8/27 Scavenger Hunt –8/27Elements of Thieves

154 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Friday September 19 th Overview Bellringer: Design an Experiment using the Scientific Method for One Liter Bottled Water Rockets, where you determine the best amount of water to add to get the greatest height. All rockets will be pumped to the same pressure of air (60psi) and you will have 10 launches to discover the best amount of water. Place your design in the Lab section of the Notebook. Be sure that you have covered these areasScientific Method

155 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Designing Water Rocket Experiment –Making Observations What model rocket launches have you seen before? How does the rocket get launched? How and where are we going to set up the experiment? –Asking Questions How are we going to tell which rocket goes the highest? What would happen to the test results if we varied the air pressure? –Forming a Hypothesis, your guess as to how much water will give the highest launch –Testing Hypothesis Create a Data Table where you can organize your findings How can you get close to the truth soon so the final launches can give the best details to the question –Analyzing Results How will you tell how much water to put into each successive launch as you get close to highest –Drawing Conclusions How did the results compare with the hypothesis. Why was the correct amount of water the best? If a 2 Liter Bottle was used, what would be the best amount of water for that? –Communicating Results – what will be the best way to get your results to the teacher?

156 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Wednesday September 24 th Overview Slide 135 Media Computer Lab Get together in Lab Groups and each of you answer the Water Rocket Lab Quiz; –password: Homer –Each student print the results of this quiz Login to the Computer –Call teacher over for assistance –Find Shortcut to Coon on Leon MS-10 on the Desktop Find Leon High School Shortcut and open it –See your grades by clicking on Online Grades –Take any missing quizzes or tests Chapter 1 Test –password Carver October Sky Quiz –Password Sputnik Ch1.1retake.eot –Password retake Chapter 1.2 quiz –password big bang Chapter 1.3 quiz –password data Chapter 1 Review –Password review Next be sure you finished Sample Final Exam.eot password final Read About the Science and Engineering FairScience and Engineering Fair Google Science Fair Project Ideas and see what you want to do for a project games.htmlhttp://chemistry2.csudh.edu/ptablegames/ptable games.html –Level I Game get it under 60 seconds before going to level II –Level II game get it under 100 seconds before going to level III Reread Worlds Biggest Scientific Experiment article and Google more about it for extra credit.Worlds Biggest Scientific Experiment Google George Washington Carver or Roentgen for extra Credit report

157 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Rocket Lab: Team Name: ___________ Period: ____ Rocket Mass _____ in grams Rocket & Stand ______ - Stand ____= Rocket Mass Group Name or Launch # Pressure in Rocket (psi) Water in Rocket (ml) Time of Flight sec. (s) Protractor Angle degrees. (°) Observations

158 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Team Assignment Sheet Date: _____ Period: ___ Team Name: _____________________ Team Leader: _____________________ Launch Director _____________________ Flight Director: _____________________ Data Officer: _____________________ Trajectory Officer: _____________________

159 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Friday September 26 th Overview Yesterday was Rocket Launch Get in Teams and Plot your data on Graphs – One for each team member. Place it in Lab portion of notebook – I will take it up later for a grade with the rest of the reportGraphs Team Leader assign one member to do protractor calculations with the conversion sheet that I give you. Keep the calculations and the Sheet. Watch more Inconvenient Truth and continue to fill out Study Guide Homework: Decide on 5 things you would be willing to do for a Science Fair Project and two other people you would be willing to work with (3 per team Maximum) Extra Credit: Go to Saturday Physics at FSU from 9:30 to 11:30 and watch the presentation on Physics of Waves in the large lecture hall (Room 101) at the east end of the Richards Undergraduate Physics Laboratory, located near the west end of campus (see campus map),campus map

160 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Monday & Tuesday September 29 th & 30 th Continue An Inconvenient Truth using the study guide. A Test will be given on it on Friday. Tuesday – Finish An Inconvenient Truth. Have discussions and go over the answers. Tomorrow we will transition to chapter two and continue with the Water Rocket Experiment.

161 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Quiz Answers 1. a.7.7 x 10 8 cm 2 b.9.11 x m 2 c.3.57 x 10 7 g d.1.3 x cm 3 2 a.5.0 x 10 2 L/s b.6.9 g/cm 3 c.5.5 x 10 5 cm 2 d.8.3 x cm 3

162 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Using Significant Figures Write in Note Section (Todays Date) Precision: the degree of exactness of a measurement Sort these units of length from the least precise to the unit with the greatest precision. –Centimeters –Kilometers –Megameters –Nanometers –Meters –Millimeters –Gigameters –Micrometers Which tape measure would be more precise, the one marked to decameters or the one marked to decimeters? Significant figures: the digits in a measurement that are known with certainty Hint: Zeros are only significant if they are sandwiched between other numbers –Do 3 and then 4a. from handout Accuracy: the extent to which a measurement approaches the true value What if the decimeter tape had about 0.5 meters torn off. Which would suffer, its precision or its accuracy?

163 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Significant Figures PracticePractice 1.Round m, kg, and cm to four significant figures. 2.Round m, cm, and kg to one less significant figure than they each have currently. 3.Use the equation, A = l x w, to find the area of a rectangle that is 48.5 cm long and 3.77 cm wide. Round your answer to the correct number of significant figures. 4.Use the equation, weight = mass x free-fall acceleration, to find the weight of a kg dog. Round your answer to the correct number of significant figures kg x 9.81 m/s 2 = 5.Multiply m x m x 8.7 m. Round your answer to the correct number of significant figures.

164 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Math Review Pages Scientific Notation Basic Skills Basic Skills SI Units and Conversions Basic Skills Converting Measurements

165 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Practice SI Units and Conversions Between them 1.Convert 100 m, the length of a well-known track event, to kilometers. 2.Convert 5.98 x kg, the mass of Earth, to milligrams, mg. 3.If you reported how quickly energy was used, measuring energy in joules, J, and time in seconds, s, which unit would you use? 4.Convert a force of N to units of gcm/s 2. 5.Convert the gravitation constant of 6.67 x Nm 2 /kg 2 to Nkm 2 /g 2

166 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Practice Converting Measurements 1.In Canada, you pass a speed limit sign that says 75 km/h. How fast can you drive in mi/h? 2.How many liters of milk are in 3.5 gal? 3.How many meters long is a 100 yd football field? (Note that 1 yd = 3 ft.)

167 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu More Math Review Sheets Math Skill Writing Scientific Notation Math Skill Using Scientific Notation Math Skill Significant Figures

168 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Answers Chapter Review p d; 2. b; 3. a; 4. d; 5. c; 6. b; 7. d; 8. a; 9. c 10. Chemistry once thought to only belong in the non living world is now known to exist inside the living body 11. The sun sets repeatedly in the west and this statement does not try to attempt to say why so it is a law instead of a theory. 12. Since the measurement has been done to 3 significant figures it is known that the precision is to the milliliters. The accuracy is not known unless compared to a standard or calibrated.

169 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Concept Mapping Section 3 Organizing Data Chapter 1

170 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Understanding Concepts, continued 3. What is a scientific theory? A.A theory is a guess as to what will happen. B.A theory is a summary of a scientific fact based on observations. C.A theory is an explanation of how a process works based on observations. D.A theory describes a process in nature that can be repeated by testing. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

171 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Understanding Concepts, continued 4. When designing a new airplane, experienced pilots use computer simulations to determine how changes from previous designs affect the planes handling in flight. What is the advantage of computer simulation over actually building the plane and having pilots test it in actual flight situations? Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

172 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Understanding Concepts, continued 4. When designing a new airplane, experienced pilots use computer simulations to determine how changes from previous designs affect the planes handling in flight. What is the advantage of computer simulation over actually building the plane and having pilots test it in actual flight situations? Answer: The computer simulation provides a model of the new plane so that potential design problems can be corrected without risk to the pilots and without the expense of building an airplane that does not function well. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

173 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills Two thousand years ago Earth was believed to be unmoving and at the center of the universe. The moon, sun, each of the known planets, and all of the stars were believed to be located on the surfaces of rotating crystal spheres. Motion of the celestial objects could be predicted based on the complex movement of the spheres that had been determined using observations recorded over many years. 5. Demonstrate why this description of the universe was a useful model to ancient astronomers but not to present-day astronomers. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

174 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills, continued 5. [See previous slide for question.] Answer: It was useful because it could predict motions of objects in the sky. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

175 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Interpreting Graphics 6. What is the volume of the gas 40 seconds into the experiment? A.15 mL B.24 mL C.27 mL D.50 mL Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

176 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Notebook – Syllabus First, Bellringer Tab Syllabus in Front Bellringer Tab –8/20 Be Sure you turned in 5 by 8 information Card –8/21 4 Sciences, 3 Technologies, 2 Laws –8/22 George Washington Carver 3, 2, 1 –8/23 George Washington Carver Quotes –8/24 Fertilizer Experiment Part 1 –8/27 Fertilizer Experiment Part 2 –8/28 KWL pp Section 1.2 –8/29 SI Tables –8/30 Even Problems p 17 Practice –8/31 Conversion Shortcut / King Henry –9/4 KWL pp –9/5 Fertilizer vs. Height Graph

177 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Notebook – Homework Tab Be sure Syllabus page is turned in, Lab Expense 8/27 Section 1.1; SR p 11; Odd questions 1-9 8/28 Section 1.2; SR p 19; #s 2-5, 7 8/29 Section 1.2; SR p 19 #s 1, 6; CR p 27 # 4, 5, 9 8/30 Practice Math Problems p 17 Odd questions 9/4 SR p26 #s 1-4 9/5 SR p26 #s 5-7

178 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Notebook – Notes Tab Frame Routine 1.1 Nature of ScienceFrame Routine Frame Routine 1.1 Nature of Science ContinuedFrame Routine Frame Routine 1.2 The Way Science WorksFrame Routine Scientific Method Diagram Diagram 9/4 Frame Routine 1.2 Units of MeasureFrame Routine 9/5 Frame Routine 1.3 Organizing DataFrame Routine

179 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Notebook – Handout Tab Scavenger Hunt Elements of Thieves

180 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Notebook Rubric Prd: ___ Name:____________ Score: ___ –Syllabus in Front Bellringer Tab –8/18 Be Sure you turned in 5 by 8 information Card –8/19 Four Sciences, 3 Technologies, 2 Laws –819 George Washington Carver Questions –8/21 George Washington Carver Quotes –8/26 Fertilizer Experiment Part 1 –8/27 Fertilizer Experiment Part 2 –9/3 KWL pp Section 1.2 –9/4 SI Tables –9/5 Conversion Shortcut / King Henry –9/9 KWL pp Section 1.3 –9/16 Chapter Review p Each Item is 3 points for having it –Add 15 points for Paying the Lab Fee Homework Tab –Be sure Syllabus page is turned in, Lab Expense –8/27 Section 1.1; SR p 11; Odd questions 1-9 –8/28 Section 1.1; SR p 11; Even questions 1-9 –9/2 Section 1.2; SR p 19; #s 2-5, 7 –9/3 Section 1.2; SR p 19 #s 1, 6; CR p 27 # 4, 5, 9 –9/4 Odd Problems p 17 –9/5 Study Guide Section 1.2 –9/8 SR p –9/9 SR p –9/10 Study Guide Section 1.3 –9/16 Mixed Review Notes Tab –8/19 George Washington Carver 3, 2, 1 –8/20 Frame Routine 1.1 Nature of Science –9/5 Even Problems p 17 –9/5 Scientific Method Diagram –9/9 Fertilizer vs. Height Graph –9/10 Practice p 23 #s 1, 2 Lab Tab (Empty) Handout Tab –8/27 Scavenger Hunt –8/27Elements of Thieves


Download ppt "Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects open in Internet."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google