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Celebrating the Strengths &Talents Within 6-12 Language Arts Leadership Mandatory Training Session Honolulu Airport Hotel, Oahu October 27, 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Celebrating the Strengths &Talents Within 6-12 Language Arts Leadership Mandatory Training Session Honolulu Airport Hotel, Oahu October 27, 2006."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Celebrating the Strengths &Talents Within 6-12 Language Arts Leadership Mandatory Training Session Honolulu Airport Hotel, Oahu October 27, 2006

3 Introductions Petra Schatz, Ph.D. –Educational Specialist Maria Gordon, State Resource Teacher Debra Masada, State Resource Teacher

4 Todays Desired Outcomes An understanding of the HCPS III Implementation Process Model and related support tools An understanding of how to use the searchable feature of the Benchmark Maps to assist in lesson planning and/or task creation An increased understanding of language arts benchmarks and the method of assessing those benchmarks by reviewing and discussing the released H S A items, rubrics and student examples Student work examples with commentary for a range of proficiency levels for selected benchmarks Have fun!

5 Expectations-Which Hat Am I Wearing?

6 Literacy Opportunities in Our Back Yard Celebrate Reading Festival Ted Kooser-Poet Laureate Shiro Matsuo Poetry Contest Barry Lane IRA Regional Conference: Hawaii Nov th Katie Ray

7 HCPS III Implementation Process Model 1. Identify relevant benchmarks. 2. Determine acceptable evidence and criteria. 3. Determine learning experiences that will enable students to learn what they need to know and to do. 4. Teach and collect evidence of student learning. 5. Assess student work to inform instruction or use data to provide feedback. 6. Evaluate student work and make judgment on learning results and communicate findings. The HCPS III Implementation Process Model is used by teachers to plan and implement standards-based curriculum, assessment, and instruction.

8 HCPS III Implementation Process Model 1. Identify relevant benchmarks. Which benchmark(s) will be the central focus of the lesson/unit? 2. Determine acceptable evidence and criteria. What evidence will show that the student has met the benchmarks at the appropriate taxonomic level? 3. Determine learning experiences that will enable students to learn what they need to know and to do. What strategies or learning experiences will build understanding and help all students meet proficiency? How can the General Learner Outcomes and Process Standards enhance the learning experience? 4. Teach and collect evidence of student learning. 5. Assess student work to inform instruction or use data to provide feedback. What does the evidence indicate about the students progress? Other evidence: reflections, observations, interviews. Is there enough work to make a judgment about the students level of proficiency? What further support is needed? 6. Evaluate student work and make judgment on learning results and communicate findings. What is the level of proficiency most recently demonstrated by the student?

9 HCPS III Implementation Process Model 1. Identify relevant benchmarks.Which benchmark(s) will be the central focus of the lesson/unit? HCPS III (www.doe.k12.hi.us)www.doe.k12.hi.us Secondary Course Benchmark Development (in progress) –Reading Workshop –Expository Writing Benchmark Maps

10 ACCN UPDATES The high school program has required courses in grades 9 and 10 with an option to supplement or substitute the required courses with basic elective courses in grades 11 and 12 only. Grade 9- English Language Arts 1 Grade 10-English Language Arts 2 Basic Elective= English Graduation Credit Specialized Elective= Elective credit only (e.g., newswriting, reading workshop, strategic reading) Supplemental Elective= Elective credit only. These are lab courses taken concurrently with required or basic elective courses ( e.g., World Literature lab, English Language Arts lab).

11 BENCHMARK MAPS DEFINITION: The state benchmark maps are a sequence of clustered benchmarks to be covered within a grade or course. PURPOSE: Benchmark Maps provide consistency in identifying when benchmarks will be addressed as schools develop curriculum maps.

12 Review: Benchmark Maps- feedback 1. Read the maps individually, note suggestions on your individual recording sheets. 2. Share your suggestions as a group. 3. Come to a consensus. 4. Place suggestions that come from the consensus on the recording sheet. 5. Make sure to include the rationale for your suggestions.

13 Review: Feedback on the Benchmark Maps Shared Understanding: No changes will be made to the benchmarks themselves. Feedback will be collected in multiple venues. Feedback will focus on the placement of benchmarks. We will collect 1 recoding sheet (per grade reviewed) from each group. Please do not write on the maps themselves.

14 BENCHMARK MAPS Major Changes: DraftNew Map Genre FocusSuggested Text Focus Literary (Q1-3) Informational (Q2-4) Functional (Q2- 4) Many more italicized benchmarks Many benchmarks moved to fit text focus.

15 HCPS III Implementation Process Model 2. Determine acceptable evidence and criteria. 3. Determine learning experiences that will enable students to learn what they need to know and to do. 4. Teach and collect evidence of student learning. 5. Assess student work to inform instruction or use data to provide feedback. State Support –Instructional Map –Taxonomic Level Trainings and Modules (see complex area School Renewal Specialists)

16 Taxonomic Level Trainings 10/13- North/South Central 11/6- Farrington Kaiser 11/13- CKW 11/20-11/21-Mckinley/Roosevelt 11/27- Lanai 11/30- Kaimuki Kalani 12/05- NPW 12/12- Kauai 1/30- Molokai 2/5- Kailua/Kalaheo 2/6- Hilo/Laupahoehoe/Waikea

17 Instructional Map Developed by OCISS w/ input from field and aligned to the Benchmark Map Includes sample assessment tasks with accompanying rubrics and criteria Includes student work (exemplars) for the tasks that are provided

18 Instructional Map Timeline Fall 2006 Contracted teachers will create tasks for all quarters and grade levels. These tasks will be presented to Fall LA Leadership participants (by e mail in January) to implement. Spring 2007 Participant teachers will do the tasks for 3 rd & 4 th quarter; Quarter 3 Due by April 5, 2007 Quarter 4 Due by June 11, 2007 At Spring LA Leadership meetings, we will analyze student work from the third quarter and write commentary. Fall 2007 At Fall LA Leadership meetings, we will look at 4 th quarter work from Spring Spring 2008 We will look at 1 st and 2 nd quarter work and write commentary

19 Creating the Sample Tasks Step 1: Defining the Targets: Does the task align to the targeted benchmark? –SPA (specific performance assessment) and benchmark rubric –Placement in the Benchmark Map –Standard Progression of the Benchmark At the appropriate taxonomic level? – Marzanos 4 levels of taxonomy

20 Creating the Sample Tasks Step 2: Determine the Assessment Evidence: Developing a Task and Criteria: Consider the purpose of the task as initial, formative, or summative. Consider the SPA and the Benchmark Rubric to develop the task. Consider the appropriate level of difficulty or taxonomy. Consider criteria/rubrics that are research-based. Consider implementing a pre-assessment or use formative assessment evident to develop rubric/criteria for the task. Consider using forms and checklists for evidence of proficiency, as appropriate.

21 Design your own…SHARED EFFORT Educational Websites rls rls Supplemental Resources Textbooks / Chapter Tests (with modifications) Identifying Assessment Tasks

22 Well I got that, but how will the students be assessed on the H S A?

23 HAWAII STATE ASSESSMENT UPDATES As of Based on HCPSIII The H S A will include 6 sessions –4 standards-based sessions that include 2 reading and 2 math sessions of multiple- choice and constructed response items. –2 norm-referenced sessions that include 1 reading and 1 math session of multiple choice items.

24 Norm referenced test= A test comparing test takers to each other ½ below the midpoint and ½ above Criterion referenced test= A test intended to measure how well a person has learned a specific body of knowledge

25 H.S.A. Assessment Schedule Fall 2006Spring 2007 Writing (4, 6, 9 and 11) 5-dimensional scoring Field-test new writing prompts October 30 & 31 Reading (3-8, 10) April (5 days) Make up April (6 days) Fall 2007Spring 2008 Writing (4, 6, 9 and 11)Reading (3-8, 10) Fall 2008Spring 2009 Writing (4, 6, 9 and 11)Reading (3-8, 10)

26 Hawaii State Assessment Updates The Terra-Nova will replace the SAT-9 as the norm referenced portion of the Hawaii State Assessment Raw scores CR Items will be scored using item-specific rubrics rather than generic rubrics. 4 points- extended response 2 points- short answer

27 HSA- Support to Schools In lieu of printed H S A related documents, such as the Interpretive Guides, teachers will be able to access the Released Items website, an on-line resource that will house items as of 8/8/06 (blue handouts)www.hsaitems.org

28 NEW RUBRICS (HSA) From generic to item specific Why– greater inter-rater reliability in a large scale assessment

29 Generic Rubric 3 The response indicates an appropriate stance (personal, interpretive, or critical) is taken in relation to the text under consideration. The explanation of the elements of that stance in relation to the text itself (literary, informative, or functional) is clear and shows a good understanding of the complexities involved. The response contains sufficient detail to ensure the completeness of the answer.

30 Item Specific Rubric Grade 7 Question: Using details from the passage, explain Wus goals as an underwater photographer.

31 Item-Specific Rubric 2 The response addresses the task in a satisfactory manner. It is complete and accurate, containing enough information (general or specific) to answer the question thoroughly. For this item, the response includes two of the following correct details: Wu wants to show others how to appreciate the beauty and mystery of the ocean. Wu wants to inspire people to protect marine life by showing them the damaging effects of pollution and over fishing in the sea Note: Responses that include information about Wus motivation/goal in taking pictures of ocean wildlife will be accepted, such as Wu enjoys taking photos of sea creatures because he finds them interesting.

32 H S A Support to Schools (continued) Lets examine H S A released items Where do these come from? -HCPS II items (Harcourt)

33 H S A Support Tools Examine H S A Sample Items---Read Your Sample Items Think about the following questions 1. How does this support my understanding of the benchmark and how it might be assessed? 2. How can this resource be used to support student achievement? 3. What is the most significant feature of this tool? (complete protocol in groups of 4)

34 HCPS III Implementation Process Model 6. Evaluate student work and make judgment on learning results and communicate findings. Standardized Course Assessment- coming soon for high school courses. not meant to determine a students grade Standards Based Report Card for secondary schools

35 SEARCHABLE BENCHMARK MAPS Welcome Hilary Apana-Mckee, School Library Services Specialist Advanced Technology Research Branch

36 WELCOME! Kristin Noelle Wolfgang Kau High and Pahala Elementary School

37 COLLABORATING FOR HIGH STANDARDS: Analyzing Student Work Why we examine student work: To set common performance standards so teachers will have a clearer understanding of teaching targets and be more consistent in their evaluation of student learning in relations to standards To plan reteaching of concepts to students who have not met the performance standards To identify possible strengths and/or weaknesses in instructional and programmatic practices so teachers can plan improvements

38 Closure Thank you so much for your participation today! Expectations for the Spring! (we need your student work!) Please remember to fill out the evaluation form. Have a safe trip home!


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