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Splash Screen. Gunter Marx Photography/CORBIS Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Section 1:Section 1:History and Governments Section 2:Section 2:Cultures.

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Presentation on theme: "Splash Screen. Gunter Marx Photography/CORBIS Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Section 1:Section 1:History and Governments Section 2:Section 2:Cultures."— Presentation transcript:

1 Splash Screen

2 Gunter Marx Photography/CORBIS Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Section 1:Section 1:History and Governments Section 2:Section 2:Cultures and Lifestyles Summary

3 Chapter Intro 1 Place The United States and Canada are former British colonies and have long traditions of democratic government. Both nations also play a major role in international affairs and the global economy. Large numbers of immigrants from around the world continue to add to the diversity of the American and Canadian populations. How do you think immigration affects the cultures of countries?

4 Chapter Intro 2 Section 1: History and Governments The characteristics and movement of people impact physical and human systems. England established several colonies in North America during the 1600s and 1700s. These colonies later formed two large, independent democracies: the United States and Canada. Today they have become home to millions of people from around the world who moved to these lands to start new lives.

5 Chapter Intro 2 Section 2: Cultures and Lifestyles Culture influences peoples perceptions about places and regions. The cultures of the United States and Canada reflect the influence of many different ethnic groups. These groups range from the Native Americans who first lived in the area to the most recent arrivals from all parts of the world.

6 Chapter Intro-End

7 Section 1-Main Idea The characteristics and movement of people impact physical and human systems.

8 Section 1-Key Terms Content Vocabulary colony annex terrorism dominion representative democracy federalism amendment parliamentary democracyparliamentary democracy Academic Vocabulary economy regime principle core

9 A.A B.B Section 1-Polling Question Do you think terrorism is a problem for the United States? A.Yes B.No

10 Section 1 Until 1913 most rural Americans had limited access to markets because it took traveling a long time on poor roads to get to them. Then, on January 1, 1913, the United States Postal Department introduced Parcel Postor the transporting of packages to and from the homeowners own mail box. The economy experienced a huge boost as people quickly discovered the wonders of catalog shopping.

11 Section 1 History of the United States The United States emerged as a world power in the 1900s.

12 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) 15,000 years ago, Asian hunters crossed a land bridge between eastern Siberia and Alaska to become North Americas first settlers and ancestors of todays Native Americans. Europeans became aware of the Americas in 1492, when explorer Christopher Columbus reached islands in the Caribbean Sea. United States Expansion

13 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) Spain soon set up colonies, gaining great wealth from gold and silver mines in Mexico and South America.colonies The French established colonies in eastern Canada, the Great Lakes area, and the Mississippi River valley. The British settled along the Atlantic coast. United States Expansion

14 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) In 1763 Great Britain defeated France in a war and won Frances North American colonies. In 1776 the colonists in Great Britains 13 coastal colonies declared their independence; in 1783 Britain recognized the new United States. United States Expansion

15 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) During the 1800s, the United States expanded to the Pacific Ocean. Some of this growth came through treaties with other countries, and some came when the United States annexed a particular area.annexed United States Expansion

16 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) Throughout the 1800s, high birth rates, advances in public health, and the arrival of millions of European immigrants helped the U.S. population grow. The American economy also grew because of new machines, factory systems, and transportation systems.

17 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) By 1900, the United States was one of the worlds major industrial powers and soon became a world leader. It was involved in World Wars I and II, and its leaders urged the worlds people to fight for freedom against oppressive regimes.

18 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) After World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union competed for political and economic world leadership. This rivalry was known as the Cold War, which ended with the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991.During this period, African Americans, Latino Americans, Native Americans, and women sought equal rights in the United States.

19 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) Leaders such as Martin Luther King, Jr.; Rosa Parks; and César Chávez used peaceful methods that led to social changes. Since 2000, the United States has faced challenges from the growth of terrorism, or the actions of individuals or groups who use violence against civilians to reach political goals.terrorism

20 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) On September 11, 2001, about 3,000 people died in terrorist attacks against the United States. Soon after, United States troops overthrew the Taliban rulers of Afghanistan.

21 Section 1 History of the United States (cont.) The leaders had protected the Muslim terrorist group al-Qaeda, which carried out the September 11 attacks. In 2003 U.S. troops overthrew Iraqs dictator, Saddam Hussein, who was accused of hiding illegal weapons and helping terrorists.

22 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 Which country had colonies in Canada? A.Spain B.Portugal C.Sweden D.France

23 Section 1 History of Canada Canada gradually won independence from British rule during the late 1800s and early 1900s.

24 Section 1 History of Canada (cont.) Canadas first settlers were Native American groups. The first Europeans to arrive in Canada were Viking explorers from Scandinavia, who landed in about A.D but did not stay. In the 1500s and 1600s, both England and France claimed areas of Canada.

25 Section 1 History of Canada (cont.) The French founded Quebec and Montreal and ruled the area around the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes for almost 230 years. By the 1760s, the British had won control of most of Frances Canadian colony. In the late 1700s, British and American citizens began setting up farms along Canadas Atlantic coast and in what is now Ontario.

26 Section 1 History of Canada (cont.) French-speaking Canadians lived mostly in present-day Quebec. European warfare and diseases had nearly destroyed many Native American cultures by this time. In 1867 most of Great Britains colonies in eastern Canada became one nation known as the Dominion of Canada.

27 Section 1 History of Canada (cont.) As a dominion, Canada had its own central government to run local affairs, but Great Britain still controlled Canadas relations with other countries.dominion At Canadas founding, the government promised to protect the French language and culture in Quebec, but French speakers claimed that they were treated unfairly because of their heritage.

28 Section 1 History of Canada (cont.) During the early 1900s, many immigrants arrived, and Canadas population and economy grew. Canadas support of the British and Americans during the two World Wars led to its full independence. In 1982 Canadians won the right to change their constitution without British approval. Today, Canada still faces the chance that Quebec will separate and become independent.

29 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 What language is spoken in Canada? A.French B.Spanish C.English D.Both A and C

30 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada The United States and Canada are democracies, but their governments are organized differently.

31 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) The United States and Canada are both representative democracies, in which voters choose leaders who make and enforce the laws. representative democracies The United States Constitution, written in the late 1780s, explains how our national or central government is set up and how it works.

32 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) The writers of the Constitution applied the principle of separation of powers; they divided the power of the national government among three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial. They also used the idea of checks and balances, or each branch having unique powers as a way to prevent the other branches from abusing their power.

33 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) The U.S. Constitution created a strong central government, but state governments were given certain responsibilities. This structure reflects the idea called federalism, or when power is divided between the federal, or national, government and state governments. federalism

34 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) In the U.S. federal system, people are citizens of both the nation and their state and have the right to vote for both national and state leaders. In 1791 ten amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, were added to the U.S. Constitution.amendments Their purpose was to prevent the government from taking away peoples freedoms, such as freedom of speech.

35 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) Individual freedom is a core value of the United States, as is equality. The Constitutions Fourteenth Amendment requires the states to provide equal protection under the law to all persons within their boundaries. For several decades after independence, only white males could vote.

36 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) African American males gained the right to vote when the Constitution was changed in All women were given the right to vote in 1920.

37 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) Canada has a parliamentary democracy, in which voters elect representatives to a lawmaking body called Parliament.parliamentary democracy These representatives choose a prime minister to head the government. The British monarch serves as king or queen of Canada.

38 Section 1 Governments of the United States and Canada (cont.) Canada has a federal system in which power is divided between the central government and the provinces and territories. Canadas Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects the liberties of Canadian citizens.

39 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 Who were the last people in the United States to be given the right to vote? A.African Americans B.Jews C.Women D.Both A and B

40 Section 1-End

41 Section 2-Main Idea Culture influences peoples perceptions about places and regions.

42 Section 2-Key Terms Content Vocabulary ban suburb indigenous bilingual Academic Vocabulary evolve generate participate

43 A.A B.B Section 2-Polling Question Do you think there many immigration restrictions for the United States? A.Yes B.No

44 Section 2 Each February, the Yukon Quest, a 1,000-mile dog sled race, begins in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada, and ends in Fairbanks, Alaska. Sled teams have 14 dogs and one driver known as a musher. The race lasts about two weeks and goes though temperatures as low as –40ºF (–40ºC) and winds up to 100 miles per hour (161 km per hour).

45 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States The culture of the United States has been shaped by immigrants from around the world.

46 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) During the late 1700s and early 1800s, most immigrants came from Great Britain, Ireland, western and central Africa, and the Caribbean. From the late 1800s to the 1920s, most came from southern, central, and eastern Europe; China; Japan; Mexico; and Canada. About 300 million people live in the United States, making it the third-most-populous country.

47 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) In 1965 a new law based entry into the United States on work skills and links to relatives already living here. In 1882 Congress passed a law that banned almost all immigration from China, and in 1924 another law limited other immigrants. banned

48 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) By 2000, nearly half of the immigrants came from Latin America and Canada, and another third came from Asia. Less than 15 percent came from Europe. The number of immigrants to the United States rose during the late 1900s.

49 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) African Americans are 12 percent of the population, Asian Americans are 4 percent, and Native Americans are 1 percent. People of European descent still make up about two-thirds of the population, but Latinos or Hispanics make up 15 percent of Americans and are the fastest-growing ethnic group.

50 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) Americas earliest artists used materials from their environment to create their works. Native Americans carved wooden masks or made pottery from local clay. English is the primary language of the United States, and Spanish is the most widely spoken language after English.

51 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) Modern painters such as Winslow Homer and Georgia OKeeffe painted scenes from nature; in contrast, Thomas Eakins and John Sloan painted gritty city scenes.

52 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) One theme of American literature is diversity. –Writers Langston Hughes and Toni Morrison portray African Americans in their works. –Chinese American viewpoints are presented in the novels of Amy Tan, and Oscar Hijuelos and Sandra Cisneros write about the countrys Latinos.

53 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) A second theme in American literature is the landscape and history of particular regions. –Mark Twains books represent life along the Mississippi River in the mid-1800s. –Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote about the people of New England. –Willa Cather and Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote about the Great Plains, and William Faulkner about life in the South.

54 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) Americas country music grew out of folk music from the rural South in the 1920s and gained many fans as it evolved over the years. In the early 1900s, African Americans developed jazz and blues, which inspired rock and roll in the 1950s. Rap and hip- hop are now popular.

55 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) Todays movie industry generates enormous profits and continues to entertain audiences around the world. After 1950, television became an important part of American culture. Today, the United States is a land of urban dwellers, although many people have moved from cities to suburbs.suburbs Top Countries for Internet Use

56 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of the United States (cont.) Since the 1970s, the fastest-growing regions have been the South and Southwest. About two-thirds of American families own their own homes. Americans lead the world in the ownership of cars and personal computers and in Internet use. Millions of young Americans participate in sports leagues, such as baseball and soccer.

57 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 2 Who is one of the best known African American authors? A.Amy Tan B.Nathaniel Hawthorne C.Mark Twain D.Toni Morrison

58 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of Canada Canadians of many different backgrounds live in towns and cities close to the U.S. border.

59 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of Canada (cont.) About one-fourth of Canadians are of French ancestry. Most of these people live in Quebec, where they are 80 percent of the population. People of British ancestry form another fourth of Canadas population, and they live mainly in Ontario, the Atlantic Provinces, and British Columbia. Other European backgrounds form about 15 percent of the population.

60 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of Canada (cont.) Canada also is home to people of Asian, African, and Latin American backgrounds. Indigenous Canadians, or people who are descended from the areas first inhabitants, number more than a million.Indigenous

61 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of Canada (cont.) Canada is a bilingual country, meaning it has two official languages:bilingual –English –French To ensure their language and culture, many French speakers want Quebec to become an independent country.

62 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of Canada (cont.) In 1999 the Canadian government created the territory of Nunavut for the northern indigenous Inuit people who had wanted self-rule while remaining part of Canada. In Nunavut, the Inuit govern themselves, although they still rely on the national government for some services.

63 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of Canada (cont.) Certain foods are regional favorites. –Seafood dishes are popular in the Atlantic Provinces, while French cuisine is preferred in Quebec. –Ontario features Italian or Eastern European foods. –British Columbia is known for salmon and Asian foods.

64 Section 2 Cultures and Lifestyles of Canada (cont.) Many Canadians enjoy hockey, lacrosse, hunting, and fishing. They celebrate the founding of Canada on July 1 and the fall Thanksgiving holiday in October.

65 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 2 To preserve their culture, which province of Canada wants to become an independent country? A.Ontario B.British Columbia C.Quebec D.Nunavut

66 Section 2-End

67 VS 1 American History Native Americans, or indigenous peoples, are North Americas earliest inhabitants. The 13 British colonies declared independence in During the 1800s, the United States grew in population and had a prosperous economy. The United States became a global power during the 1900s.

68 VS 2 Canadian History France and then Britain acquired control of the area that today is Canada. In 1867 the Dominion of Canada was founded. Canada grew through immigration and developed a modern economy.

69 VS 3 American and Canadian Governments The United States and Canada are democracies based on federal systems. The U.S. government has three branches, each with special powers to check the power of the others. Canada has a parliamentary system. Legislative members choose a prime minister to head the government.

70 VS 4 American Culture Immigration has created a diversity of groups, languages, and religions. American art and literature have focused on nature and freedom. American music includes country and jazz. American lifestyles reflect the economic well-being of the people.

71 VS 5 Canadian Culture Canadian culture reflects the diversity of the many peoples who settled the country. Canadian art and literature draw on nature and the history of the country. Foods and pastimes in Canada reflect regional life and the contributions of immigrants.

72 VS-End

73 Figure 1

74 Figure 3

75 PP Trans

76 DFS Trans 1

77 DFS Trans 2

78 Vocab1 colony overseas settlement tied to a parent country

79 Vocab2 annex declare ownership of an area

80 Vocab3 terrorism violence used against the people or government in the hopes of winning political goals

81 Vocab4 dominion self-governing country in the British Empire

82 Vocab5 representative democracy form of government in which voters choose leaders who make and enforce the laws

83 Vocab6 federalism form of government in which power is divided between the federal, or national, government and the state governments

84 Vocab7 amendment an addition to a legal document or law

85 Vocab8 parliamentary democracy form of government in which voters elect representatives to a lawmaking body called Parliament, and members of Parliament vote for an official called the prime minister to head the government

86 Vocab9 economy way of producing goods

87 Vocab10 regime government

88 Vocab11 principle rule or guideline

89 Vocab12 core basic or fundamental

90 Vocab13 ban legally block

91 Vocab14 suburb smaller community just outside a large city

92 Vocab15 indigenous people descended from an areas first inhabitants

93 Vocab16 bilingual accepting two official languages; able to speak two languages

94 Vocab17 evolve develop

95 Vocab18 generate make

96 Vocab19 participate take part in

97 Help Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Transparency button from the Chapter Menu, Chapter Introduction, or Visual Summary slides to access the transparencies that are relevant to this chapter. From within a section, click on this button to access the relevant Daily Focus Skills Transparency. Click the Return button in a feature to return to the main presentation. Click the Geography Online button to access online textbook features. Click the Reference Atlas button to access the Interactive Reference Atlas. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the chapter slide show. Click the Help button to access this screen. Links to Presentation Plus! features such as Graphs in Motion, Charts in Motion, and figures from your textbook are located at the bottom of relevant screens. To use this Presentation Plus! product:

98 End of Custom Shows This slide is intentionally blank.


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