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Splash Screen. Charles O'Rear/CORBIS Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Section 1:Section 1:Living in the United States and Canada Today Section 2:Section.

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Presentation on theme: "Splash Screen. Charles O'Rear/CORBIS Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Section 1:Section 1:Living in the United States and Canada Today Section 2:Section."— Presentation transcript:

1 Splash Screen

2 Charles O'Rear/CORBIS Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Section 1:Section 1:Living in the United States and Canada Today Section 2:Section 2:Issues and Challenges Summary

3 Chapter Intro 1 Regions The United States and Canada both have large land areas. Each has unique landforms and resources. Americans and Canadians have used their rich resources and technological skills to become leading economic powers. How might a regions economy influence the world economy?

4 Chapter Intro 2 Section 1: Living in the United States and Canada Today Places reflect the relationship between humans and the physical environment. Both the United States and Canada are often divided into economic regions. These regions are based on similar resources and climates. People in each region have developed distinctive ways of life based on the different physical characteristics of their area.

5 Chapter Intro 2 Section 2: Issues and Challenges Cooperation and conflict among people have an effect on the Earths surface. The United States and Canada are peaceful neighbors, sharing the longest undefended border in the world. Landforms and weather patterns do not stop at the border, however, and environmental actions by one country can affect the other.

6 Chapter Intro-End

7 Section 1-Main Idea Places reflect the relationship between humans and the physical environment.

8 Section 1-Key Terms Content Vocabulary free market profit stock biotechnology newsprint Academic Vocabulary guarantee media reluctant

9 A.A B.B Section 1-Polling Question Do you think it is safe to keep your money in a bank? A.Yes B.No

10 Section 1 In both the United States and Canada, many family- owned farms are struggling with competition from commercial farms and imported products. An idea that may allow small farms to survive is agritourismor opening the farm to visitors. Farmers offer such interests as pick-your-own fruits, wagon or sleigh rides, overnight stays, horseback riding, or cattle drives. City dwellers enjoy seeing where their cereal comes from, and farmers stabilize their income.

11 Section 1 Economic Regions The United States can be organized into economic regions.

12 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) In a free market economy, people are free to buy, sell, and produce whatever they want, with limited government involvement.free market –They also can work wherever they want. United States and Canada: Regions

13 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) –In a free market economy, business owners produce the products they think will make the most profits, and consumers shop for the best products at the lowest prices.profits United States and Canada: Regions

14 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) Also in a free market economy, people can buy stock, or part ownership, in a company.stock When a company succeeds, it often pays some of its profits to the stockholders, but if the business fails, the stock becomes worthless. United States and Canada: Regions

15 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) People can also save their money in a bank. Because of government guarantees, some of the money is protected should a bank fail. Although savings accounts are better protected, stocks provide a greater chance for high financial payoff. United States and Canada: Regions

16 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) The economic focus of the Northeast has been on business. New York City has many financial and media companies. Boston is an important center for biotechnology research.biotechnology The Midwests rich soil enables farmers to grow crops such as corn, wheat, and soybeans. United States and Canada: Regions

17 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) Mineral resources found here include iron ore, coal, lead, and zinc. Beginning in the 1800s, manufacturing developed in the Midwest. Towns like Cleveland and Detroit made steel and automobiles, but over time the factories grew outdated and many closed, taking thousands of jobs with them. United States and Canada: Regions

18 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) With its rich soils, the South long relied on agriculture; today, the area has expanding cities, growing industries, and diverse population. –Houston, Dallas, and Atlanta make electrical equipment, computers, textiles, and airplane parts. United States and Canada: Regions

19 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) –Texas, Louisiana, and Alabama produce oil and related products. –In Florida, tourism and trade are major activities. United States and Canada: Regions

20 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) The Interior West has magnificent scenery and outdoor recreation that attracts many people. Although the region is dry, irrigation allows for some agriculture. For many decades, mining, ranching, and lumbering were the Interior Wests main economic activities. United States and Canada: Regions

21 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) Denver and Salt Lake City both have growing information technology industries. Albuquerque and Phoenix have tourism and service industries. In the Pacific area, fruits and vegetables are important crops for California, Oregon, and Washington. United States and Canada: Regions

22 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) Sugarcane, pineapples, and coffee grow in the rich volcanic soil of Hawaii. Fish, timber, and mineral resources are important in the Pacific area as well. California has gold, lead, and copper, and Alaska has vast reserves of oil. United States and Canada: Regions

23 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) Many industries thrive in California and Washington, including airplane manufacturing and computer software development. –Los Angeles is the world center of the movie industry. United States and Canada: Regions

24 Section 1 Economic Regions (cont.) –California, the nations most populous state, has wide ethnic diversity. Nearly half of its people are Latino or Asian American. United States and Canada: Regions

25 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 Which is a product of Hawaii? A.Gold B.Timber C.Oil D.Sugarcane

26 Section 1 Regions of Canada With a few exceptions, Canadas economic regions are similar to those in the United States.

27 Section 1 Regions of Canada (cont.) Fishing was for many years a major industry in the Atlantic Provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick, but overfishing has weakened the industry. Today most people hold jobs in manufacturing, mining, and tourism. The city of Halifax, in Nova Scotia, is a major shipping center.

28 Section 1 Regions of Canada (cont.) Canadas Central and Eastern Region includes the provinces of Quebec and Ontario. The paper industry is important in Quebec, as is the creation of hydroelectric power. Montreal, on the St. Lawrence River, is a major port and leading financial and industrial center.

29 Section 1 Regions of Canada (cont.) Many in Quebecs largely French-speaking population would like the province to separate from Canada. Because of the uncertainty this creates, many outside businesses have been reluctant to invest in Quebecs economy.

30 Section 1 Regions of Canada (cont.) Ontario, an agricultural, manufacturing, forestry, and mining center, has the largest population and greatest wealth of Canadas provinces. The capital, Toronto, is Canadas largest city and a major center of finance and business. It is home to people from about 170 countries.

31 Section 1 Regions of Canada (cont.) Farming and ranching are major activities in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. This area produces large amounts of wheat for export and has large reserves of oil and natural gas. British Columbia has extensive forests that help make Canada the worlds largest producer of newsprint, the paper used for printing newspapers.newsprint

32 Section 1 Regions of Canada (cont.) Mining, fishing, and tourism also help British Columbias economy. Vancouver, its capital, is Canadas main Pacific port. Canadas vast North covers about one- third of the country.

33 Section 1 Regions of Canada (cont.) This area includes the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Many of the 25,000 people in this area are indigenous peoples. The main resources in the North are minerals such as gold and diamonds.

34 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 1 Which province has vast forests that provide the world with newsprint? A.Quebec B.Manitoba C.British Columbia D.Alberta

35 Section 1-End

36 Section 2-Main Idea Cooperation and conflict among people have an effect on the Earths surface.

37 Section 2-Key Terms Content Vocabulary trade deficit tariff trade surplus acid rain brownfield urban sprawl Academic Vocabulary restrict community

38 A.A B.B C.C Section 2-Polling Question Do you think there is a way to stop urban sprawl? A.Yes B.No C.I dont know what urban sprawl is

39 Section 2 Urban sprawl has caused the decline of many downtowns, but Paducah, Kentucky, responded in an innovative way. Its leaders created the Artist Relocation Program, offering monetary aid to artists who will purchase and restore old houses and open studios. So far, 70 artists are involved with the Lowertown Arts District. Paducah is again thriving, artists have ownership security and community, and other towns have new hope.

40 Section 2 The Region and the World The United States and Canada trade with countries throughout the world.

41 Section 2 The Region and the World (cont.) The United States has the worlds largest economy and is a leader in world trade, with exports of chemicals, farm products, manufactured goods, and raw materials such as metals and cotton fiber. Canada sends many of the same goods overseas, as well as large amounts of seafood and timber products. Both countries are also major importers.

42 Section 2 The Region and the World (cont.) The United States and Canada support free trade, or the removal of trade restrictions, so that goods flow freely among countries. The United States needs more oil than it produces and depends on imports from Canada, Mexico, Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, and Nigeria.

43 Section 2 The Region and the World (cont.) The United States spends hundreds of billions of dollars more on imports than it earns from exports, resulting in a massive trade deficit, or when a country spends more on imports than it earns from exports. trade deficit To sell their products in the United States, some nations set the prices of their goods very low.

44 Section 2 The Region and the World (cont.) Also, some countries place high tariffs, or taxes, on imports in order to protect their own industries from foreign competition.tariffs These tariffs then raise the price of U.S. products and thus reduce the sale of the products abroad. Such practices hurt American companies and cost American workers their jobs.

45 Section 2 The Region and the World (cont.) Canada enjoys a trade surplus, or earning more from exports than it spends for imports.trade surplus –Canadas smaller population makes its energy needs less costly. –Also, Canadas export earnings have been growing.

46 Section 2 The Region and the World (cont.) Since the early 2000s, the United States and Canada have worked to prevent terrorist attacks by increasing security along their long border and have participated in international efforts to stop terrorism. In 2003 Canada opposed the U.S. decision to invade Iraq, urging the American government to continue seeking a peaceful solution through the United Nations (UN).

47 Section 2 The Region and the World (cont.) The United States and Canada provide much of the UNs funding, and they take part in UN agencies that provide aid to people in areas affected by war or natural disasters. Both countries have sent soldiers to serve in UN forces that act as peacekeepers in troubled areas of the world.

48 Section 2 Did Canada support the United States invasion of Iraq? A.Yes B.No A.A B.B

49 Section 2 Environmental Issues The United States and Canada face similar environmental issues.

50 Section 2 Environmental Issues (cont.) For energy, Americans and Canadians burn coal, oil, and natural gas, causing air pollution. When mixed with water vapor in the air, the pollution makes acid rain.acid rain Canada has passed laws to reduce the amount of fossil fuels that is burned.

51 Section 2 Environmental Issues (cont.) The United States has funded research for new, less environmentally harmful energy sources. Changing climatic conditions and a rising demand for water have lowered water levels of the Great Lakes.

52 Section 2 Environmental Issues (cont.) Lower lake levels decrease the amount of goods that can be shipped, harm fish populations, and affect tourism as water pulls back from the areas beaches. Brownfields are places such as old factories and gas stations that have been abandoned and contain dangerous chemicals that hinder new development.Brownfields

53 Section 2 Environmental Issues (cont.) Governments in the United States and Canada have given money to communities for cleanup. Urban sprawl, or the spread of human settlement into natural areas, has led to the loss of farmland and wilderness areas, traffic jams, increased air pollution, and strains on water and other resources.Urban sprawl

54 A.A B.B C.C D.D Section 2 Which factors have lowered the levels of the Great Lake? A.Rising demand for water B.Global warming C.Changing climatic conditions D.Both A and C

55 Section 2-End

56 VS 1 Free Market Economies The United States and Canada have free market economies that allow people to own businesses and earn profits. Producers and consumers decide what to produce, how much to produce, and for whom to produce. Governments play a limited role in free market economies.

57 VS 2 U.S. Regions The five economic regions of the United States are the Northeast, the Midwest, the South, the Interior West, and the Pacific. The South and the Interior West are growing rapidly in population and economic strength. The Northeast focuses on business. The Midwest is rebuilding its industries. The Pacific area has diverse economies and populations.

58 VS 3 Canadian Regions Canadas main economic regions are the Atlantic Provinces, the Central and Eastern Region, the West, and the North. The Atlantic Provinces suffer from the decline of the fishing industry. Many people in French-speaking Quebec want their province to be independent. Ontario is Canadas most populous and economically prosperous province. The West includes the grain-producing areas and the Pacific coastal province of British Columbia.

59 VS 4 Global Ties The United States and Canada have joined Mexico in promoting free trade among their countries. The United States is a major global trading power. Its trade deficits, however, could cause future economic problems. The United States and other countries are working to prevent terrorist attacks.

60 VS 5 The Environment The United States and Canada are reducing the amount of chemicals released into the air to reduce acid rain. Declining water levels and rising demand for water are affecting the Great Lakes. The United States and Canada face the loss of farmland and wilderness areas as urban sprawl increases.

61 VS-End

62 Figure 1

63 PP Trans

64 DFS Trans 1

65 DFS Trans 2

66 Vocab1 free market type of economy in which people are free to buy, produce, and sell with limited government involvement

67 Vocab2 profit money a business earns after all its expenses are met

68 Vocab3 stock part ownership in a company

69 Vocab4 biotechnology study of cells to find ways of improving health

70 Vocab5 newsprint type of paper used for printing newspapers

71 Vocab6 guarantee promise

72 Vocab7 media types of communication such as the Internet, television, and radio

73 Vocab8 reluctant hesitant

74 Vocab9 trade deficit situation that occurs when the value of a countrys imports is higher than the value of its exports

75 Vocab10 tariff tax added to the price of goods that are imported

76 Vocab11 trade surplus situation that occurs when the value of a countrys exports is higher than the value of its imports

77 Vocab12 acid rain chemicals from air pollution that combine with precipitation

78 Vocab13 brownfield sites that have been abandoned and may contain dangerous chemicals

79 Vocab14 urban sprawl spread of human settlement into natural areas

80 Vocab15 restrict to limit

81 Vocab16 community neighborhood

82 Help Click the Forward button to go to the next slide. Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide. Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Transparency button from the Chapter Menu, Chapter Introduction, or Visual Summary slides to access the transparencies that are relevant to this chapter. From within a section, click on this button to access the relevant Daily Focus Skills Transparency. Click the Return button in a feature to return to the main presentation. Click the Geography Online button to access online textbook features. Click the Reference Atlas button to access the Interactive Reference Atlas. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the chapter slide show. Click the Help button to access this screen. Links to Presentation Plus! features such as Graphs in Motion, Charts in Motion, and figures from your textbook are located at the bottom of relevant screens. To use this Presentation Plus! product:

83 End of Custom Shows This slide is intentionally blank.


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