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1 14th Flying Training Wing Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development I n t e g r i t y -

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Presentation on theme: "1 14th Flying Training Wing Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development I n t e g r i t y -"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 14th Flying Training Wing Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

2 – 0800PT 0900 – 1100Mentoring and Counseling 1110 – 1210EAF/Joint Ops/Total Force 1210 – 1330Lunch 1330 – 1530Discipline 1530 – 1630Senior Leadership Panel (Group CCs) Agenda (Day 2)

3 NCO Professional Development Mentoring & Counseling Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

4 4 Mentoring defined Counseling defined Steps in the Process Scenarios Comparing Mentoring/Counseling Overview

5 5 A trusted Counselor Coaching - Specific tutoring for an event Counseling - Exchanging opinions/ideas in order to reach a decision Teaching learned wisdom A mentor is defined as a trusted counselor or guide. Mentoring, therefore is a relationship in which a person with greater experience and wisdom guides another person to develop both personally and professionally. AFI Mentoring (Defined/Purpose )

6 6 Mentoring is not a promotion enhancement program Mentoring helps each individual reach their maximum potential Mentoring covers a wide range of areas: Career guidance Technical and professional development Leadership AF history and heritage Ethics, core values, More..... Mentoring Benefits

7 7 Air Force definition: (taken from AFI ) Immediate supervisor is your mentor All of your subordinates are your mentees Mentoring is an inherent responsibility of leadership This does not preclude you from seeking other mentors--personal or professional Supervisors must make themselves available to subordinates who seek career guidance and counsel Mentor/Mentee Relationship

8 8 Supervisors must prepare themselves to be effective mentors! Study the applicable AF specialty career path pyramid and career experience matrix Supervisors must continually challenge their subordinates to improve Mentors need to distinguish between individual goals, career aspirations, and realistic expectations Mentor/Mentee Relationship (cont)

9 9 NCOs are mentors to: Jr NCOs Airman Civilians Ample opportunities Receive broader view of the Air Force Stay abreast of latest changes Role model on many levels Pass on heritage as enlisted members Mentoring the Mentor

10 10 Steps in the Mentoring Process What are the steps in the mentoring process? Establish rapport Help them establish goals Help them implement goals Give advice and be available when needed Follow-up Mentoring is an on-going relationship that continues on and off duty.

11 11 Feedback Verbal Documented Counseling is a systematic two-way discussion between the supervisor and subordinate concerning duty performance as compared to established standards with the intention of informing the subordinate of his/her past duty performance and cooperatively developing a plan to improve performance. Counseling Defined

12 12 Counseling is to help the follower realize that an opportunity exists to change negative behavior and to reinforce positive behavior. Help people make wise choices and decisions Help people be better adjusted or promote their mental health (refer to professionals) Why Do We Need Counseling?

13 13 Goal setting is important in personal and professional life--provides a measuring stick Near-term goals Mid-term goals Long-term goals Be careful not to set unattainable goals, and make sure your mentee doesnt either Be careful not to set goals which are easily attainable Goals should provide a driving force Celebrate after accomplishing goals Goal Setting

14 14 Performance feedback is essential to mentoring Provide realistic assessment of performance Measure performance against established criteria and goals Point out strong suits Point out weaknesses, and recommend ways to improve Review goals to see if they need adjusting Encourage open communication Bottom line: A glowing feedback is easy to give, but will it help improve your people? Performance Feedback

15 15 Recognition comes in many forms Amn/NCO of the Quarter Volunteer Award Technical (AFSC) Awards Specialty (Honor Guard) Awards Team Awards Decorations Etc. You owe it to your people to write them up when they are deserving--SET THEM UP FOR AWARDS! Mentees: dont be shy about awards--let them know when youre deserving! SET YOURSELF UP! Recognition

16 16 There are four major kinds of situations that require counseling: Job Related Interpersonal Situational Personal or Emotional Counseling Situations

17 17 Help someone make wise choices and decisions Keeping counselee on the right track Getting counselee to overcome fear of criticism Ensuring counselee clearly understands expectations Involving the counselee in developing solutions Counseling Challenges

18 18 Counseling Process What are the steps in the counseling process? Set the meeting Establish a relationship Help the counselee gain self-understanding of the area requiring change Devise a plan to resolve problem and follow-up

19 19 Counseling Environment What are some other things to consider when conducting a counseling session? Private/Quiet, non-threatening place Limit interruptions Allocate plenty of time Non-verbals Confidentiality

20 20 Comparing Mentoring/Counseling What are some of the similarities between mentoring and counseling? The overall steps Both help individuals to make decisions Both are supervisor responsibilities

21 21 Comparing Mentoring/Counseling (cont) What are some of the differences between mentoring and counseling? Mentoring is Proactive and Counseling is Reactive Mentoring ensures the needs of the protégé are met Counseling ensures Air Force standards are met

22 22 Comparing Mentoring/Counseling (cont) What other things do you need to take into consideration? Home Station, TDY or Deployed Location Understanding and appreciating the uniqueness of everyone involved

23 23 Scenario #1 You are the NCOIC of the section. The commander has recently notified you that the squadron has been selected to support another deployment. This is the third time this year! They are asking for volunteers, but you know you will have to twist arms to fill out the team. Everyone is getting frustrated with the high Ops Tempo. Senior Airman Howell is one of the squadrons best troops. He is the first to volunteer for these operations and rarely complains. Today is a different story however. SrA Howell tells you that he cannot volunteer for this deployment because his wife is threatening to leave him if he keeps going away for months at a time. What are the issues? Would you use counseling or mentoring? Why? How would the outcome change if you had chosen the alternative?

24 24 Scenario #1 Answers 1. What are the issues? Professional - Need to fill the mission. Personal - Need to take care of SrA Howell. 2. Would you use counseling or mentoring? Why? Counseling – for the marital problems –possible referral to professional 3. How would the outcome change if you had chosen the alternative? May be showing empathy but not curing the problem. If mentoring happened earlier and a plan for SrA Howells career includes participating in 2-3 deployments a year, SrA Howell can share this with his spouse and this may prevent the problem.

25 25 Scenario #2 You just received a phone call from the BX manager stating that A1C Jones has bounced two checks this week. You know that A1C Jones is supporting a family of four on one income. A1C Jones is an excellent worker and has had no other financial problems that you are aware of. What are the issues? Would you use counseling or mentoring? Why? How would the outcome change if you had chosen the alternative?

26 26 Scenario #2 Answers 1. What are the issues? Financial problems – breaking law Member with huge amount of stress due to having problems supporting their family 2. Would you use counseling or mentoring? Why? Counseling – severity of the problem. Airman is already in trouble and needs to change habits to meet AF standards. 3. How would the outcome change if you had chosen the alternative? If mentoring had been done prior to the offense, supervisor could have offered resources that possibly could have prevented the problem i.e. AF Aid Society, PFMP (Personal Financial Management Program) and WIC (Women, Infant, and Children).

27 27 Scenario #3 SrA Gonzales works downstairs in the Commanders Support Staff. She runs into you in the hallway and tells you that she is considering separating from the Air Force when her enlistment is up. She has asked her immediate supervisor for advice on several occasions, but her supervisor continually tells her they are too busy right now. You know that she is a good airman and has received numerous letters of appreciation during commanders call. You also have seen her at the local community college where you both attend classes. You know she is a valuable member of the Air Force and want to help her make an educated decision about her future. What are the issues? Would you use counseling or mentoring? Why? How would the outcome change if you had chosen the alternative?

28 28 Scenario #3 Answers 1. What are the issues? Poor supervision Retention of a good Airman in question 2. Would you use counseling or mentoring? Why? Mentoring – Want to provide her with as much information as possible so SHE can make an educated decision. She is in compliance with Air Force standards. 3. How would the outcome change if you had chosen the alternative? If the supervisor uses counseling and tries to make the decision for her, she could rebel and separate.

29 29 Mentoring defined Counseling defined Steps in the Process Scenarios Comparing Mentoring/Counseling Summary

30 30 Questions?

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48 48 Questions?

49 49 LUNCH Be back at ???

50 NCO Professional Development Discipline Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

51 51 Nothing is more harmful to the service than the neglect of discipline; for that discipline, more than numbers, gives one army superiority over another. Quote - George Washington

52 52 Supervisors Role and Responsibility Establish and Communicate Effective Standards Preventive Measures Supervisor Disciplinary Tools Commander disciplinary tools SNCOs Roles and Responsibilities in Discipline Developing First Line Supervisors QFRB--Quality Force Review Board Involuntary separation (when all else has failed) NCO benefits regarding involuntary separation Overview

53 53 Supervisors Role and Responsibilities To keep the office running smoothly (be visible/accessible) To correct substandard performance To set and enforce standards (lead by example) To be fair and consistent Counseling Advise troops about the disciplinary process Provide recommendations to Senior Leadership Gaining the knowledge to be effective Establishing credibility up and down the chain

54 54 Understand/Explain Standards What are standards? Standards are the rules and regulations Standards are expectations of behavior and performance Written/Unwritten rules of behavior and work performance

55 55 Enforcing Standards What are your responsibilities towards enforcing standards? Make sure subordinates follow the rules Correct substandard performance Rehabilitate Consistency Reward those who exceed the standards

56 56 Establish and Communicate Effective Standards How do you determine required standards within your section? Specific mission of section Lead by example Continuous feedback Educate supervisors on corrective measures available Established norms (i.e. Duty Hours, Uniforms, Customs and Courtesies, etc.) Supervisor requirements/expectations Be sensitive to perceived/real problems

57 57 Effective Standards What constitutes an effective standard? An effective standard is: Legal (align with AFIs) Obtainable Measurable Clear An understandable expectation

58 58 Understanding Standards How do you ensure your subordinates understand your standards? Clearly state what your standards and expectations are Ask follow up question for clarity Give them the opportunity to discuss the standards with you

59 59 Preventive Measures How do you set your people and unit up for success? Create the proper work environment Get to know your troops and families Be proactive, not reactive Continuous feedback

60 60 Establish A Healthy/Positive Environment How do you get to know your troops? Show interest by asking questions about family, hobbies, goals, etc. (Get to know their spouses/kids names.) Morale Visits Schedule activities away from the job Talk to your troops Build a good working relationship/establish trust

61 61 How do you establish trust with your people? Day-to-day interaction Be consistent and fair Be approachable Set the example Be objective Personal Interest in Subordinates

62 62 Day-to-Day Interaction By getting to know your troops and establishing mutual trust, what are the day-to-day benefits? Troops will approach you for help Recognize problems before they get to large Unit and mission will benefit (i.e., feeling of empowerment, new ideas, etc.) A positive work center environment NCOs increased sense of purpose and value Efficiency (increased productivity)

63 63 Verbal Counseling--recommend you do an MFR afterwards Letter of Counseling--provides record of counseling Letter of Admonishment--attempt to deter offender from repeating behavior--advises member of consequences if behavior is repeated Letter of Reprimand--formal censure reprimanding offender for his/her conduct Supervisor Disciplinary Tools

64 64 Unfavorable Information File Varying length of time based on violation and level of punishment Identifies member on the Commanders Enlisted Management Roster (CEMR)--not a good thing Commander Disciplinary Tools

65 65 Control Roster Lasts 6 months Cant reenlist Cant test for promotion Cant PCS CEMR identification Commander Disciplinary Tools

66 66 Article 15--Non-Judicial Punishment (NJP) Offered, not forced Punishment based on members rank AND commanders rank Forfeiture Reduction Extra duty Restriction Correctional custody Commander Disciplinary Tools

67 67 Courts Martial --Three types Summary--Lowest level--one judge, no jury, minor incidents of misconduct--accused must consent Special--Intermediate level--6 months confinement max, 2/3 pay for 6 months, Bad Conduct Discharge (enlisted only); certain lesser punishments General--Highest level--may include death, Dishonorable Discharge All members entitled to free legal counsel Commander Disciplinary Tools

68 68 Administrative and Punitive Administrative--initiated by commander Honorable Under Honorable Conditions Under Other than Honorable Conditions Punitive--initiated by Courts Martial Bad Conduct Discharge Dishonorable Discharge Dismissal Involuntary Separation

69 69 Scenario #1 At 0046 hours, SFS received a call from a dorm resident complaining of loud music and people yelling from a room down the hall. SFS decide to investigate the noise. Upon arrival at the dorm, the room with the loud noises and yelling was identified. SFS made contact with the individual the room belonged to, Amn John Deer. After seeing empty beer cans laying on the floor, SFS requested that all people present show some form of picture identification. Upon review of identification it was discovered that Amn John Deer was only 17 years old and showed signs of being intoxicated. SFS secured the room and escorted Amn John Deer to the SFSCC where he was read his rights IAW Art 31 UCMJ. He consented to a blood alcohol test and was found to be legally intoxicated. Question #1-What did he do wrong? Question #2-Ask your self what Article of the UCMJ did he violate? Question #3-What is the appropriate level of discipline?

70 70 Answers to Scenario #1 Answer #1-On Columbus AFB the legal drinking age is 18 years old, so underage drinking is his offense. Answer #2-This is a tough one because the UCMJ doesnt have an Article for underage drinking. Amn Deer had a duty not to drink while under the age of 18 so he was derelict in his duty, which is Article 92. Answer #3-This is another tough question which requires you to ask yourself a few more questions. Has this guy been in trouble before? Was this a first time offense? How is his duty performance? If this is the individuals first time getting into trouble and he is an outstanding worker, you as the supervisor might consider an LOR. If however the individual is constantly flaunting his disregard for AF standards and the law, you might go through you first sergeant and ask your commander to consider offering an Article 15 for this offense. Remember only the commander can make the decision to offer an Article 15, but may ask for input from the individuals supervisor before making his/her decision. True Outcome: In a similar case this was not this individuals first offense and he received an Article 15.

71 71 Scenario #2 At 0730 hours Amn Sleepy was to be at his appointed place of duty. When he did not arrive at 0745 hours, SSgt Happy decided that he was going to call him to see why he had not arrived at his place of duty. Amn Sleepy rolled out of bed and rushed to work. When he arrived he made the excuse that his alarm clock had not gone off. This however seems to be becoming a trend with Amn Sleepy. After the Amn and the SSgt talked, Amn Sleepy went to his appointed place of duty. Today he was to be cleaning out vehicles. About two hours later the SSgt went to go check to see how far along Amn Sleepy had gotten with his cleaning duties. When the SSgt arrived at the place of duty he noticed that there was no one that he could plainly see. So he began to look around and see where Amn Sleepy might be. After searching the vehicles all around the outside, he decided to check the insides of them. After he opened the door of the first truck that Amn Sleepy was to be cleaning, he found Amn Sleepy laying on the front seat sound asleep. SSgt Happy woke Amn Sleepy and asked him why he was sleeping on duty. Amn Sleepy replied that he had not yet fully awakened and had drifted off while cleaning the inside of the truck. SSgt Happy had a hard time believing this story as this seemed to correlate with him not arriving on time because he had slept in. Question #1-What did he do wrong? Question #2-Ask your self what Articles of the UCMJ did he violate? Question #3-What is the appropriate level of discipline?

72 72 Answers to Scenario #2 Answer #1-First he was late for work and next he fell asleep while he was at work. Answer #2-Article 86 of the UCMJ covers Failure to go, and for sleeping on duty you go to Article 92 of the UCMJ which covers Dereliction of Duty Answer #3-This is another tough question which requires you to ask yourself a few more questions. Has this guy been in trouble before? Was this a first time offense? How is his duty performance? If this is the individuals first time getting into trouble and he is an outstanding worker, you as the supervisor might consider an LOR. If however the individual is constantly flaunting his disregard for AF standards and the law, you might go through you first sergeant and ask your commander to consider offering an Article 15 for this offense. Remember only the commander can make the decision to offer an Article 15, but may ask for input from the individuals supervisor before making his/her decision. True Outcome: In a similar case the individual had problems with keeping appointments, which constituted the Article 86 and he had also been found to be sleeping while on duty, which with what he was doing could have caused great bodily harm to himself or others. These actions actually earned the individual, two Article 15s.

73 73 Scenario #3 After a random drug screening it is found that one of your troops tested positive for use of marijuana. The troops name is Amn Jay. You of course recognize this name very well as he has been in his fair share of trouble recently. You take Amn Jay to SFS and he agrees to make a statement after he has been read his rights according to Article 31 of the UCMJ. In his statement he admitted to smoking marijuana with two civilians downtown approximately nine days prior to the random drug test. Question #1-What did he do wrong? Question #2-Ask your self what Article of the UCMJ did he violate? Question #3-What is the appropriate level of discipline?

74 74 Answers to Scenario #3 Answer #1-He smoked marijuana a Schedule I drug and drug use in incompatible with continued military service and it violates state law and the UCMJ. Answer #2-Article 112a of the UCMJ covers Wrongful use, possession, etc., of controlled substances. Answer #3-With the information from the random drug screening and the fact that other actions of Amn Jay were so serious, a Special Court Martial was in order for Amn Jay. True Outcome: In a similar case the individual had been found to be using marijuana in a random drug screening, then only weeks later he was found to be making threats towards his 1st shirt and also was late to work on a few occasions. These actions warranted the Special Court Martial.

75 75 Good supervisors understand that exercising these tools at prudent times will lead to successful mission accomplishment and an atmosphere where people are held accountable which will pay dividends in unit morale. No one is perfect and human beings will make mistakes. If members are treated fairly and with respect while being disciplined, they are likely to quickly move on from their mistakes and not repeat them. Closing

76 76 Supervisor Disciplinary Tools Commander disciplinary tools SNCOs Roles and Responsibilities in Discipline Developing First Line Supervisors QFRB--Quality Force Review Board Involuntary separation (when all else has failed) NCO benefits regarding involuntary separation Summary

77 77 Questions?

78 78 Senior Leadership Panel Commanders


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