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Civics: Government and Economics in Action 1 Chapter 9: The Executive Branch.

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Presentation on theme: "Civics: Government and Economics in Action 1 Chapter 9: The Executive Branch."— Presentation transcript:

1 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 1 Chapter 9: The Executive Branch

2 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 2 Chapter Links Section 1 The Roles of the President Section 2 The Organization of the Executive Branch Section 3 Presidents and Power

3 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 3 Section Outline: I.Creating the Office of President II.A Leader With Many Roles III.Roles Created by Tradition Main Idea: The President of the United States is a very powerful person who plays many roles in the government. However, the Presidents power is deliberately limited by the Constitution. Key Terms: Executive Branch Foreign Policy Ambassadors Executive Agreements Domestic Policy Section 1 The Roles of the President

4 Journal In 1 paragraph, explain whether you think the presidency is an easy or demanding position. Civics: Government and Economics in Action 4

5 Chief Executive Civics: Government and Economics in Action 5

6 Commander in Chief Civics: Government and Economics in Action 6

7 Chief Diplomat Civics: Government and Economics in Action 7

8 Legislative Leader Civics: Government and Economics in Action 8

9 Party Leader Civics: Government and Economics in Action 9

10 Chief of State Civics: Government and Economics in Action 10

11 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 11 Creating the Office of President Executive Branch –The branch of government responsible for executing or carrying out, the law. Term of Office –Four years per term; two term maximum Limited Power –Checks and balances Qualifications (written) –35 years of age; natural born citizen; 14 years of residency

12 Qualifications (unwritten) Education –Many have been college educated –All since Benjamin Harrison ( ) Men –Women have run for president, but none successfully –None have received more than 200,000 votes Civics: Government and Economics in Action 12

13 Presidents to NOT graduate college PresidentYears in office Washington Jackson Van Buren Harrison (W.H.)1841 Taylor Fillmore Lincoln Johnson Cleveland Truman Civics: Government and Economics in Action 13

14 Presidents with graduate degree or higher PresidentDegree type NixonLaw HayesLaw ObamaLaw TaftLaw FordLaw ClintonLaw WilsonPh.D. Civics: Government and Economics in Action 14

15 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 15 A Leader With Many Roles Chief Executive Commander in Chief of Armed Forces Chief Diplomat –Sets foreign policy and appoints ambassadors –Makes executive agreements with other countries Legislative Leader –Sets domestic policy; plans for dealing with national problems.

16 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 16 Roles Created by Tradition Party Leader –Typically the Democratic or Republican party Head of State –The President is expected to speak for the whole nation on values and the goals of the American people.

17 Electoral College Each state has electors who vote on behalf of their state –Equal to number of members in Congress i.e. GA has 2 Senators and 14 Representatives, so how many electoral votes does GA get? 16 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 17

18 Electoral votes per state Civics: Government and Economics in Action 18

19 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 19 Main Idea: The executive branch of the government includes the President, the White House staff, the Vice President, the executive departments, and the independent agencies. Key Terms: Bureaucracy Administration Cabinet Section 2 The Organization of the Executive Branch Section Outline: I.The Executive Office of the President II.The Executive Departments The Independent Agencies The Civil Service System

20 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 20 The Executive Office of the President Bureaucracy –An organization of government departments, agencies, and offices. Administration –A team of executive branch officials The White House Staff –Presidents most trusted advisers and assistants The Vice President –Presides over the Senate; becomes president if the president dies or falls ill.

21 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 21 The Executive Departments Department of State Department of the Treasury Department of Defense Department of the Interior Department of Agriculture Department of Justice Department of Commerce Department of Labor Department of Health Department of Education Department of Housing Department of Transportation Department of Energy Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Homeland Security

22 Assignment Create an advertisement illustration for one of the Executive Departments. You should have a picture and brief description of the advertisement. Civics: Government and Economics in Action 22

23 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 23 The Independent Agencies Executive Agencies –Under direct control of the President Examples: NASA, EPA. Regulatory Commissions –Formed by Congress, these twelve commissions make and carry out rules for business and economic activity Example: FCC

24 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 24 The Civil Service System In 1883, Congress set up a system by which most government employees (called servants) are hired on the basis of merit and not political connection –Civil Service Exams created –Persons with the highest scores on the exam were hired

25 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 25 Section Outline: I.Freedom to Take Action II.Seeking a Balance III.Presidential Power Main Idea: The power of the President has expanded since George Washingtons time. The Presidents power is still balanced by the other two branches of the government. Key Terms: Treaties Executive Privilege Section 3 Presidents and Power

26 Impeachment Article II, Section 4 of the constitution states that the president (or any official) can be impeached for, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors. What does that mean?? Civics: Government and Economics in Action 26

27 Impeachment Process 1.An impeachment begins in the House, where an investigation is conducted 2.The House Judiciary Committee begins the inquiry 3.The committee conducts hearings and draw up Articles of Impeachment 4.With a simple majority, the House can impeach (much like an indictment) 5.The Senate conducts a trial, and 2/3 vote can confirm removal Civics: Government and Economics in Action 27

28 Johnson Impeachment DateEvent Civics: Government and Economics in Action 28 March 2, 1867 May 26, 1868 May 16, 1868 March 30, 1868 March 5, 1868 March 4, 1868 February 24, 1868 February 21, 1868 After 2 more votes, trial officially ends 1 st votes are tallied in Senate, to confirm Senate trial begins C.J. Chase reports as presiding officer over Senate trial House delivers articles of impeachment to Senate House votes in favor of impeachment Johnson orders removal of Edwin Stanton, Secretary of War Johnson vetoes Tenure of Office Act

29 Clinton Impeachment Background –Stemmed from investigation into Clintons alleged abuses and conduct as president –Clinton had a sexual harassment lawsuit served to him by Paula Jones from when he was governor of Arkansas Civics: Government and Economics in Action 29

30 Clinton Impeachment During investigation into his conduct of the Paula Jones case, Monica Lewinsky was taped saying she had relations with the president Clinton denied claims at first, but later admitted his wrongdoings Civics: Government and Economics in Action 30

31 Clinton Impeachment House of Representatives drafts Articles of Impeachment accusing president of perjury and obstruction of justice 12/19/1998 H.o.R. approved impeachment – for perjury – for obstruction Civics: Government and Economics in Action 31

32 Clinton Impeachment Senate acquitted Clinton Voted on 2/12/1998 –45-55 for perjury –50-50 for obstruction Civics: Government and Economics in Action 32

33 Venn Diagram Create a venn diagram showing the differences and similarities between the 2 impeachments (at least 2 facts for each part) Civics: Government and Economics in Action 33 JohnsonClinton

34 Impeachment Analysis On a sheet of paper to be turned in with your impeachment packet, explain in AT LEAST 1 paragraph which of the 2 presidents impeachments was more deserving. –Use specific examples to support your argument –Choose one or the other!!!! Civics: Government and Economics in Action 34

35 9.3 Reader Read p Define treaties and executive privilege Create a chart showing the following Civics: Government and Economics in Action 35 PresidentQuestion of PowerEnd result Thomas Jefferson Harry Truman Richard Nixon

36 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 36 Freedom to Take Action Treaties –Formal agreements between nations Executive Privilege –The right to keep some information secret from the Congress of the Courts.

37 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 37 Presidential Power The Louisiana Purchase 1803 –French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte offered President Thomas Jefferson of the United States the Louisiana Territory for the bargain price of $15 million. The Constitution did not say whether the President had the power to buy territory President Jefferson and his Secretary of State James Madison decided since the President had the power to make treaties, he could make a treaty purchasing the land.

38 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 38 Presidential Power (cont.) Harry Truman and the Steel Mills –Truman unsuccessfully tried to seize control of American steel mills to prevent a wartime strike. Nixon and Watergate –Nixon unsuccessfully applied executive privilege to the a special Senate committee and House Judiciary committee investigating an illegal burglary of the Democratic party offices at the Watergate Hotel –Nixon, severely implicated, resigned 8/9/1974


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