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ARE YOU READY? A Guide to Disaster Planning for Clients & Staff.

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Presentation on theme: "ARE YOU READY? A Guide to Disaster Planning for Clients & Staff."— Presentation transcript:

1 ARE YOU READY? A Guide to Disaster Planning for Clients & Staff

2 Purpose It is the policy of the State of South Carolina is to be prepared for any emergency or disaster. South Carolina State Regulations 58-1 and 58- 101 require contingency plans and implementing procedures. Persons with special needs or functional needs need to take extra care in preparing for an emergency. From making sure you have adequate medication, medical supplies and equipment to knowing what special resources you may require to make it safely through a disaster. This guide was developed to help clients and staff alike prepare for natural disasters and unexpected emergencies.

3 How Would You Define a Disaster?

4 Disasters are… Events that causes great harm or damage or an incident that causes widespread destruction and distress. They can strike quickly and without warning and can force you to evacuate your neighborhood or confine you to your home.

5 Categories of Disasters Disasters can be categorized into three groups: 1. Natural 2. Accidental 3. Intentional

6 Disasters can be natural, examples include: Hurricanes Tornadoes Floods Droughts Extreme Heat Fires Blizzards Earthquakes Volcanoes Tsunamis Ice Storms Disease Epidemics

7 Hurricane Hugo Hugo crossed into South Carolina coast near the Isle of Palms in September of 1989. The surface winds were recorded at 138 miles per hour and gusts of more than 160 miles per hour. The damage to coastal and inland properties, utilities, agriculture, timber and commerce exceeded $6 billion. 50- 70,000 people were left homeless and 26 people were killed (SCDNR).

8 Types of Disasters - Natural Hurricane Hugo Charleston, SC 1989

9 Disasters can be accidental, examples include: Explosions Toxic spills Transportation Accidents Structural Failure Building Collapse Disease Oil Spills Global Warming Floods Droughts Fires

10 Types of Disasters - Accidental Train Derailment Graniteville, SC 2005

11 Intentional Disasters include: Hijackings Riots Demonstrations Stampedes Bombings Shootings Kidnappings Assassinations Bombings Cyber Attacks Threats of Terrorism Wars

12 Intentional Disasters Twin Towers Sept. 11, 2000 New York

13 Planning & Preparation Are You Ready?

14 All too often in emergency situations the needs of people with disabilities are overlooked or swept aside. People with special needs need to take extra care in preparing for an emergency. The services you rely on daily may not be available in the event of an emergency. Plan

15 15 Plan Disaster and emergencies often disrupt routines. They can change when and where you eat, sleep, play, work, study, go to school, how you get around, when you see your family and friends. This Is Not A Test

16 Plan The stress caused by having to think about what you might do in an emergency much less actually having to cope with a disaster is a common experience. Disaster planning can be overwhelming for anyone but it doesnt have to be.

17 1. Know the hazards and emergencies that may affect you and your family. 2. Develop an emergency plan. 3. Collect and assemble disaster supplies kit. 4. Learn where to seek shelter from all types of hazards. Prepare

18 5. Identify the community warning systems and evacuation routes. 6. Include in your plan required information from community and school plans. 7. Learn what to do for specific hazards. 8. Practice and maintain your plan. Prepare

19 Know the difference between Watches and Warnings: In a Watch conditions are right for something to happen. For example, during thunderstorms tornados may form, streams and rivers may flood. In a Warning the event has happened. The tornado has are flooding been sighted or the streams and rivers are flooding. Prepare

20 You can cope more successfully with an emergency or a disaster by preparing in advance. You are in the best position to plan for your own safety. Knowing what to do is your best protection and your responsibility. Are You Ready?

21 Some Common and Not So Common SC Weather Events: What You Should Do

22 Thunderstorms Thunderstorms are very common, especially during the summer. Severe storms usually have heavy rain, strong winds and, lightning. Some storms produce hail and create conditions that can cause tornadoes to form.

23 In Thunderstorms, you should... Get out of the water if you are swimming or boating. Hurry to a low open place, and crouch down so your body is like a little ball if you cant find shelter, or your hair feels like it is standing on end. Stay way from downed high voltage lines down and call the utility company. Always seek shelter during severe weather!

24 Tornadoes Tornados are among natures most dangerous storms. They can strike with little warning & cause serious destruction in seconds. The average number of tornadoes per year in SC is 28 ( SC DNR).

25 In Tornadoes, you should… Take shelter immediately if you see or hear a tornado. If You Are Outside… Lie flat on the ground in a low area covering your head with your arms and hands if you are outside, in a car, or in a mobile home with no shelter nearby. If You Are Inside… Go to the basement or storm cellar if you have one. If you dont, then move to the center of the lowest floor. Get under a sturdy piece of furniture.

26 Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Hurricanes are giant, spiraling tropical storms and the most destructive natural weather occurrences on earth. When they come onto land, the heavy rain, strong winds and heavy waves can damage buildings, trees and cars.

27 In Hurricanes & Tropical Storms, you should… The hurricane season runs from June to November, peaking mid-August to late October. Tune in the radio or television for weather updates. Follow the instructions given on: Personal Safety & Evacuation Securing your home & car Safeguarding pets & livestock Stocking emergency supplies

28 Floods Any source of water, river, lake, pond or stream has the potential to overflow, and flood the surrounding area. All areas of the South Carolina are prone to flooding.

29 In A Flood, you should… Never travel in flooded areas. Never swim in or let children play in standing flood water. Watch out for snakes, and other hazards that have moved to higher ground.

30 Winter Storms In SC snow is rare and it can be great fun but winter storms can cause severe problems. They often have strong winds, sleet, freezing rain, heavy snowfall and bitter cold as components.

31 In a Winter Storm, you should… Stay inside if possible. If you go outside dress in several layers of warm clothing. If you start to get too cold, or your nose, hands, feet or ears start to feel numb, go inside and warm up for a few minutes. Stay away from frozen ponds – the ice usually wont hold. Stay from any high voltage lines that may have fallen during the storm.

32 Earthquakes An earthquake is the shockwave that occurs when plates beneath the Earths crust shift. This movement causes the ground to become unstable and shake. South Carolina is on a earthquake fault line and we have several quakes each year. They are usually small ranging from 1.0 to 3.0 in magnitude. We have had had two major quakes; Charleston 1886 and Union 1913.

33 In an Earthquake, you should… Identify danger areas and stay away from things that break or fall on you like glass or heavy furniture. Move to a safe place where you can get under a table, desk, or against an interior wall.

34 Evacuation, Emergency Supplies and Shelters

35 EVACUATING

36 When Should You Evacuate? 1. If a mandatory evacuation order has been issued for your area then you should leave. 2. If you live in a mobile home you should always evacuate if the emergency is weather related.

37 Evacuation Kits What items do you want in your evacuation kit? Are they the same as the items you think you need to pack? How long should you plan for?

38 Evacuation Kits

39 It is a good idea to have a go bag. That is a bag that ready to grab if you have to go to a shelter. You can use a backpack, duffle bag or laundry bag. Your name should be clearly written on it. Your supplies should last for a minimum of three days. You shouldnt over pack your kit – take only what you need and what you carry easily. Remember, there isnt a lot or room or privacy in shelters.

40 EMERGENCY SUPPLIES

41 What to Pack? The Red Cross recommends that for each person you pack: 2 blankets and a pillow a, lawn chairs or cot Prescription medication and necessary over-the-counter medications(s) 3 Gallons of water Special dietary needs, favorite non-perishable snacks Flashlights & batteries Important papers - home owners insurance, medical information etc.

42 Packing continued Personal hygiene items such as soap, towel, toothbrush, etc. Books, small toys & games - try for quiet things! Baby Supplies - diapers, bottles, formula, etc. A Patient & Cooperative Attitude!!

43 SHELTERS

44 Sheltering You dont always have to go to a shelter. If you can, stay with friends or relatives or have them stay with you whichever is the safest location. Go to a hotel/motel. You should always have more than one option, more than one plan. Needs during disaster differ, choose the best plan for that situation. Staying in a shelter should be your last choice.

45 Sheltering in Place - Supplies Because not everyone has to, can, or will evacuate in the event of an emergency. If you stay home here are the basics you should consider stocking: Food & Water First Aid & Special Items for Medical Conditions Clothing & Bedding Tools & Emergency Supplies

46 Shelters If the safest place to stay is a shelter then go. It will help if you are prepared – most shelters are runs by the Red Cross. They do not allow you to bring in weapons, drugs, alcohol, pets or smoking inside the building. Shelters are not spacious, private, or quite, and there isnt always electricity and a bed for everyone. Dont expect hot showers or meals, they are not always available. There will be lines to use the bathroom and other stressful situations In general medical services are not available and it will be up to you to keep you and yours safe.

47 Shelter Realities Luxuries dont exist during an emergency.

48 Expect Shelter Rules In most shelters you will be expected to: 1.Register when you arrive and sign in and out when entering or leaving. 2.Keep your area clean and help keep the shelter clean. 3.Keep food and beverages in designated areas. 4.Respect quiet hours, watch your children. 5.Be careful with your valuables as they are your responsibility. 6.Smoke in designated areas only.

49 Katrina Survivors at a Red Cross Shelter Houston Astrodome, Houston, Texas

50 Shelters Open in Preparation for Tropical Storm Ernesto August 29, 2006 in Miami, Florida

51 Emergency Red Cross shelter just inland from Myrtle Beach, S.C - Hurricane Fran 1996

52 Shelter Rules 1.Register when you arrive and sign in and out when entering or leaving. 2.Keep your area clean and help keep the shelter clean. 3.Keep food and beverages in designated areas. 4.Respect quiet hours, watch your children. 5.Be careful with your valuables as they are your responsibility. 6.Smoke in designated areas only.

53 Staying Well During an Emergency

54 Shelters & Mental Illnesses Emergency shelters are set up to provide a secure environment for a lot of people for a short period of time, typically 3 to 7 days. In order to reduce the risk of relapse and/or lessen symptom development it is a good idea to do a self assessment to prepare in case you need to evacuate to emergency shelter. Its a good idea to develop a plan for how you will manage if a disaster disrupts your routine.

55 How Well Do You Manage When You Experience: Loud noises Crowded rooms Lights on all the time Storms Being away from your own bed Children and strangers Not being able to smoke when you want Not being able to go to bed when you want Having your daily routine interrupted or altered

56 Do You…? Have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder? Does the chaos that accompanies emergencies increase flashbacks or your depression? Hear voices? What makes it worse? Are those things likely to happen in a shelter? Have symptoms of depression, mania or anxiety when your daily routine changes?

57 Staying Well During a Disaster Are you able to identify the things that trigger your symptoms? Do you know what your early warning signs are Can you work on a plan to help you manage? Try practicing what you would say to someone if you need help: For example, you may want to tell a friend or someone at the shelter I have anxiety or panic disorder. If I panic and need assistance, I have emergency medicine in my evacuation kit. Its called __________________.

58 Staying Well During a Disaster You should know what your medications are and if you go to a shelter take them with you in the original bottles. Keep a separate list of medication names and doses in case you lose or run out of medicine. Develop a support system of friends who can help you and whom you can help. Keep important papers and information with you. Your Medicaid or Medicare card Your Doctors names and contact information

59 Staying Well During a Disaster Create a comfort box or bag. Try placing items that are familiar and bring you comfort in a box to take with you to a shelter. The box should contain items that are easy for you to transport and keep up with when in an evacuation shelter. For example, if people, strangers, and/or having to talk to others bothers you, it maybe a good idea to take a portable music player and headphones or ear plugs to block out noise.

60 Staying Well During a Disaster Remember people with special needs need to take extra care in preparing for an emergency. Make sure you have enough medication, medical supplies and equipment and know what special resources may be required for you and your family to make it safely through a emergency.

61 Staying Well During a Disaster The South Carolina Department of Mental Health has Planning Guide to help you prepare. Personal emergency information forms - 2 copies Evacuation kits and guides Sheltering information Information specific to persons with mental illnesses Information for persons with other disabilities or special needs Caring for your pets County offices of emergency management Web resources

62 Exam is Next

63 Test Your Knowledge 1.) Disasters are? A) Events that causes great harm or damage or an incident that causes widespread destruction and distress. B) Accidental, Natural, Intentional C) Strike quickly and without warning D) All of the Above 2.) Disasters can be categorized into ___ groups. A) 1 B) 3 C) 5 D) 7 3.) In emergency situations the needs of people with disabilities have priority consideration. True False

64 Test Your Knowledge 4.) The difference between Watch and Warning is - in a Watch conditions are right for something to happen - in a Warning the event has happened. True or False 5). In preparing a good response plan you need only worry about those emergencies that are most likely to happen in your area. True or False 6.) It is okay to be in a boat but not swim during a thunderstorm. True or False 7.) All areas of the South Carolina are prone to flooding. True or False 8.) There is no need to worry about earthquakes in South Carolina. True or False 9.) You only need to evacuate a mobile home in the case of a tornado warning. True or False

65 Test Your Knowledge 10.) Evacuation shelters are often crowded and noisy, they may or may not have electricity, cots are not always available and sometimes people have to sleep on the floor. True or False 11.) Evacuation kits should contain supplies for ___ days. A) 1 B) 3 C) 5 D) 7 12.) To help you stay well during an emergency you should Identify the things that trigger your symptoms, know what your early warning signs are and work on a plan to help you cope. True or False

66 Test Your Knowledge 13.) If you have to go to a shelter it is important to take a list of the medications you take so that shelter staff can make sure to stock them. True or False 14.) Having a support system of friends who can help you and whom you can help during an emergency can be an important part of your wellness plan. True or False 15.) Knowing what to do during an emergency is your best protection and your responsibility. True or False

67 Answers 1.Disaster are? D Events that causes great harm or damage or an incident that causes widespread destruction and distress, can be accidental, natural or intentional, can strike quickly and without warning. 2. Disasters can be categorized into B- 3 groups; natural, accidental or intentional. 3.) False - In emergency situations the needs of people with disabilities do not have priority consideration. 4.) True The difference between a Watch and Warning is - in a Watch conditions are right for something to happen - in a Warning the event has happened. 5). False In preparing a good response plan you need to worry about all emergencies that are happen in your area.

68 Answers 6.) False It is not okay to boat or swim during a thunderstorm. 7.) True All areas of the South Carolina are prone to flooding. 8.) False South Carolina sits on a earthquake fault line. 9.) False If you live in a mobile home you should always evacuate if the emergency is weather related. 10.)True Evacuation shelters are often crowded and noisy, they may or may not have electricity, cots are not always available and sometimes people have to sleep on the floor.

69 Answers 11.) B Evacuation kits should contain supplies for a minimum 3 days. 12.) True You should identify the things that trigger your symptoms, know what your early warning signs are and work on a plan to help you cope in an Emergency. 13.) False if you go to a shelter take medications with you in the original bottles and keep a separate list of medication names and doses in case you lose them or run out. 14.) True Having a support system of friends who can help you and whom you can help during an emergency can be an important part of your wellness plan. 15.) True Knowing what to do during an emergency is your best protection and your responsibility.

70 Thank You!!! For More Information Please Contact: Katherine Roberts, MPH, Director, SCDMH Office of Client Affairs (803) 898-8304 kmr50@scdmh.org kmr50@scdmh.org For the Disaster Planning Guide go to: http://www.state.sc.us/dmh/preparing_for_disaster.pdf


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