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CMA South Carolina Commission for Minority Affairs The Culture of Poverty presented by Sheila Albergottie MSW, Project Coordinator African.

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Presentation on theme: "CMA South Carolina Commission for Minority Affairs The Culture of Poverty presented by Sheila Albergottie MSW, Project Coordinator African."— Presentation transcript:

1 CMA South Carolina Commission for Minority Affairs The Culture of Poverty presented by Sheila Albergottie MSW, Project Coordinator African American Affairs July 8, 2009

2 Training Objectives Give an overview of the Commission for Minority Affairs Review poverty definitions / data and discuss the status of poverty in South Carolina Identify some specific issues to consider when working with persons in poverty 1. Overview of CMA and how the Commission can be a resource for working with minorities in your community. 2. Where are the pockets of poverty. Are certain centers more inclined to encounter customers that may have issues related to poverty more than others in addition to their mental health needs. 3. What strategies / interventions may be useful to assist customers. What is your role as a clinician. Are there some thing to be aware of and/or to do to help your customers transition out of poverty

3 SC Commission for Minority Affairs Mission
Serve as a think-tank to improve the plight of minorities Serve as the catalyst to bring about public policy changes Single point of contact for assistance and referral Serve as a clearinghouse for minority information Each group has an Advisory Committee that is representative of the South Carolina community. The advisory group for AA has representation from the 6 Congressional Districts. 3 3

4 Historical Overview Created in 1993 – Governor Carroll Campbell
Non-Cabinet Agency Primary focus was African Americans 2001 – Ad hoc committee for Hispanic persons 2003 – added Hispanic / Latino Affairs and Native American Affairs 1995 Full Time Equivalent (FTE’s) Positions – 3 2008 Full time Equivalent (FTE’s) Positions - 8

5 Minority Affairs Commission
Alleviate poverty and deprivation Determine contributing factors to poverty Serve as the single point of contact for minority populations African Americans Hispanics/Latinos Native Americans Other ethnic races To achieve this goal takes many different avenues based on the populations. African Americans represent over 30 percent of the state population. How many of the minorities live in poverty. 2. Are there specific / different issues pertaining to poverty for the different groups? The Hispanic population is growing and they have different issues the biggest one being language barrriers. And the Native Americans represents about 2% of the State’s population. What are their needs?

6 Contributing Factors to Poverty
Family Destruction and Weakness Education Deprivation Lack of Jobs – Under and Unemployment Lack of Community/Economic Development Lack of Income and Wealth Creation Lack of Minority Businesses/Venture Capital Health Status and Care - Disparities Disproportionate Representation - Criminal Justice System Through research exploration the agency has found these factors and the main contributors to poverty. These are our Focus Areas. WE are a small agency with currently only 8 staff

7 Current Services Community Based Services Policy and Research Services
African American Affairs Institute Hispanic/Latino Affairs Institute Native American Affairs Institute Minority Business Development We realize the state have more minorities that these 3. In fact, the other area we are to serve is the Asian American Population, but we have not be able to fill that position.

8 Poverty Status of Minorities
The SC Commission for Minority Affairs Minority Issues Conference June 11, 2007 Race, Poverty and a State of Mind Dr. Ruby Payne aha! Process, Inc. Reference our website. There is a video of the conference proceedings. One speaker is one that I will be using their material when we talk about poverty. - Dr. Ruby Payn . Founder of the aHa! Process. I will be using information from two main book that are available for use

9 aha! Process Products www.ahaprocess.com
These resources are wonderful and when I talk about some specific interventions and framework I will be using their material.

10 Poverty Overview Poverty Defined Culture of Poverty
Generational Poverty Situational Poverty Following the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Statistical Policy Directive 14, the Census Bureau uses a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to determine who is in poverty.  Poverty is relative If a family’s total income is less than the family’s threshold, then that family and every individual in it is considered in poverty. I am going to use information Poverty is defined as In % of person considered to be poor worked. --there is the working poor. of course now we know poverty rates are up. And really because of Huricane Katrina, the picture of poverty came back on the scene. The US Bureau of Labor Statistice reported in Dec that 25% of all the jobs in the US economy did not pay enough to life a family above the poverty line. A culture of poverty. What is culture? A way of life. People in poverty typically operate in a more reactive way - solving day to day problems, minute by minute. When you get money, a person in poverty is not thinking about putting that money in an innuity. Operate in the herer and now. Not in the abstract. During Katrina, people had to use reactive skills. Sensory skills. If a person has lived and operated in a poverty situation for over two yeays. They will have to be introduced to a different life style. There will need to be some model. Help a person envision coming out of poverty and becoming middle class. Situational poverty. Is what we are experiencing now with the high unemployment rate in SC. We now rank # 3 in the country for unemployment

11 Poverty Defined Poverty is relative Based on geographic location
Census Bureau - finances Following the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Statistical Policy Directive 14, the Census Bureau uses a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to determine who is in poverty.  Poverty is relative If a family’s total income is less than the family’s threshold, then that family and every individual in it is considered in poverty. I am going to use information Poverty is defined as In % of person considered to be poor worked. --there is the working poor. of course now we know poverty rates are up. And really because of Huricane Katrina, the picture of poverty came back on the scene. The US Bureau of Labor Statistice reported in Dec that 25% of all the jobs in the US economy did not pay enough to life a family above the poverty line.

12 Poverty Geographically
The Historic Black Belt's Conditions remain some of the worst in our nation. The Black Belt is still home to persistent poverty, poor employment, low incomes, low education, poor health, high infant mortality and dependance. .   A Century Ago, Booker T. Washington wrote of the Black Belt: "The term seems to be used wholly in a political sense - That is, to designate counties where the black people outnumber the white."     Today, the Southern Black Belt remains a social and demographic crescent of counties containing higher than average percentages of black residents. The region stretches through parts of Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas.     The Analysis reveals an extraordinary correspondance of the patterns of poor quality of life and the largely non-metropolitan, Black-Belt South. The greater southern region holds far more of our nation's poor people, people who have not completed high school, and those who are unemployed than are found in the Northeast, the Midwest, or the West.     Within the South, it is the Black Belt's 623 Counties that contain most of the larger region's poverty, low levels of education, and unemployment. In fact, the Black Belt, by itself includes more poverty than any of the other three major regions of our nation - the Northeast, Midwest, or the West. There is more poverty in the Black Belt - black and white - than in the area served by the Appalachian Regional Commission. Furthermore, the Black Belt matches any other region in persons who have not finished high school, and the Black Belt challenges the other U.S. regions in unemployment.  Findings show some of the special conditions - poverty, low levels of education, and unemployment - affecting the contemporary South and Black Belt. We map these circumstances and describe them statistically. We also introduce a neglected but important, if not new, factor - dependance - to the equation for socioeconomic well-being in addition to the education, employment, and rurality factors commonly used to explain poor conditions.

13 The State of Poverty in South Carolina
According to June 2009 information from the Bureau of Labor Standards, South Carolina’s current unemployment rate of 12.1 is the highest on record. This rate is a 5.8 increase from one year ago and is another indicator of the challenges facing the people of South Carolina – especially the minority population as reflected in these four specific South Carolina Counties. The map above of South Carolina counties shows that 33 counties are not in any one particular area of the State but geographically spread throughout South Carolina. At least one county with high poverty rates is located within each of the six congressional districts proving that poverty is not an isolated issue but is an issue that exists State-wide. is the online source for this map

14 Culture of Poverty The culture of poverty concept is a social theory explaining the cycle of poverty. Based on the concept that the poor have a unique value system, the culture of poverty theory suggests the poor remain in poverty because of their adaptations to the burdens of poverty. Wikipedia Encyclopedia Payne's principal message is that poverty is not simply a monetary condition. She describes it to her audiences as a culture with particular rules, values, and knowledge transmitted from one generation to the next that inform people how to live their lives successfully — how to build and keep relationships, how to get one's needs met, how to entertain and be entertained, and more. Payne asserts that children growing up in a culture of poverty do not succeed because they have been taught the "hidden rules of poverty," but not the hidden rules of being middle class

15 Poverty Generational vs. Situational
Generational poverty: families who have lived in poverty for at least two generations. Situational Poverty: families that have fallen into poverty because of a traumatic event such as illness or divorce, unemployment, etc. Dr. Ruby Payne Children of parents in poverty grow up to live in poverty themselves.

16 Counties above the National Poverty Level
County % Abbeville 17.4 Aiken 15.4 Allendale 36.8 Bamberg 27.4 Barnwell 21.8 Calhoun Charleston 15.2 Cherokee 16.8 Chester 20.1 Chesterfield 21 Clarendon 23.7 Colleton 21.7 Darlington 18.7 Dillon 27.7 Edgefield Fairfield 17.8 Florence Georgetown 17.7 Hampton 21.3 Jasper 20.8 Lancaster 17.9 Laurens 20.2 Lee 26.2 McCormick 19.6 Marion 24.3 Marlboro 26 Newberry 16.7 Orangeburg 23.2 Pickens 16.4 Saluda Sumter 18.5 Union Williamsburg 36.3 South Carolina is primarily a rural and poor state with 33 of its 46 counties falling above the national poverty level of 13.0 % and the state poverty level of 15.1% and are therefore considered distressed areas. This represents 71.7% of South Carolina counties with poverty levels that exceed the state and national poverty rates. Source: Online and

17 Counties that exceed the state and national poverty rates
County Poverty% White % State % Black % Median Household income SC Household income Allendale 36.8 28.4 68.6 70.8 28.7 $25,417 $43,508 Dillon 27.7 50.4 45.9 $28,979 Lee 26.2 37.0 62.0 $30,448 Williamsburg 36.3 31.8 67.0 $26,745 The following chart shows the poverty rates for each of the 33 South Carolina counties that exceed the state and national poverty rates: The information in the chart reveals that not only are there many counties in South Carolina that are distressed but four counties in particular are over twice the national poverty rate and two counties (Allendale and Williamsburg) are over twice the South Carolina poverty rate of 15.1 percent. Source: Online

18 Activity How We View Others Deficit Deviant Different Other
Dr. Linda Webb Watson

19 One of the key resources for success in
A Framework for Understanding Poverty Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D. Hidden Rules One of the key resources for success in school and at work is an understanding of the hidden rules. Hidden rules are the unspoken clues that individuals use to indicate membership in a group. The chart on hidden rules (see p. 5) provides details, but generally, in middle class, work and achievement tend to be the driving forces in decision-making. In wealth, the driving forces are the political, social, and financial connections. In generational poverty, the driving forces are survival, entertainment, and relationships. That is why you will have a student whose Halloween costume cost $30 but the textbook bill is not paid. Relationships and entertainment are more important than achievement. Being able physically to fight or have someone who is willing to fight for you is important to survival in poverty. Yet, in middle class, being able to use words as tools to negotiate conflict is crucial. Many times the fists are used in poverty because the words are neither available nor respected. Who is going to teach the customers about the hidden rules/

20 Intervention Issues Be prepared How you approach others matters
Communication styles Relationships This is a start. You want to continue to learn not only about people in poverty, but other cultures. How you approach someone will make the difference between them coming back or not. Do you know if a person lives in poverty. Do you have that information in your file . Do you know where they live or do you just whiz in from across town. Are you using words people can understand IN the previous activity , people can tell how you view them by how your approach them.

21 A Framework for Understanding Poverty Ruby K. Payne, Ph. D
A Framework for Understanding Poverty Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D. Additive Model Honors internal assets of people from all economic classes Names problems accurately Identifies the mindsets and patterns that individuals use to survive Identifies strengths and resources in the individual, family, school and community Offers economic diversity as a prism through which individuals and schools can analyze and respond Identifies skills, theories of change, program designs, partnerships and ways of building school where students achieve Encourage the development of strategies to respond to all causes of poverty

22 A Framework for Understanding Poverty Ruby K. Payne, Ph. D
A Framework for Understanding Poverty Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D. Behaviors Related to Poverty LAUGHING INAPPROPRIATE OR VULGAR COMMENTS PHYSICALLY FIGHT HANDS ALWAYS ON SOMEONE ELSE CANNOT FOLLOW DIRECTIONS EXTREMELY DISORGANIZED COMPLETE ONLY PART OF A TASK DISRESPECTFUL TO TEACHERS HARM OTHER STUDENTS, VERBALLY OR PHYSICALLY As you are observing your client / customer could the inappropriate laughter be a coping method of communication for poverty or would that be viewed as a characteristic of a disorganized thinking patterns, tangential thoughts as it relates to a mental disorder. Why are they still displaying certain behaviors ? Do they need more medicine or as the clinician do you need to help them transition out of poverty. There are some ways and strategies.

23 A Framework for Understanding Poverty Ruby K. Payne, Ph. D
A Framework for Understanding Poverty Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D. Key Points to Remember 1. Poverty is relative. 2. Poverty occurs in all races and in all countries 3. Economic class is a continuous line, not a clear-cut distinction. 4. Generational poverty and situational poverty are different. 5. This information and work is based on patterns. All patterns have exceptions 6. An individual brings with him/her the hidden rules of the class in which he/she was raised. 7. Schools and businesses operate from middle-class norms and use the hidden rules of middle class. 8 For our students to be successful, we must understand their hidden rules and teach them the rules that will make them successful at school and at work. 9. We can neither excuse students nor scold them for not knowing; as educators we must teach them and provide support, insistence, and expectations. 10. To move from poverty to middle class or middle class to wealth, an individual must give up relationships for achievement (at least for some period of time). 11. Two things that help one move out of poverty are education and relationships. 12. Four reasons one leaves poverty are: It’s too painful to stay, a vision or goal, a key relationship, or a special talent or skill. There are hidden rules among classes and behaviors that are related to poverty. Let’s focus on relationships # 11

24 Key Points (cont.) Resources -To better understand students and adults from poverty, the definition of poverty will be the "extent to which an individual does without resources" including: Financial--Having the money to purchase goods and services. Emotional--Being able to choose and control emotional responses, particularly to negative situations, without engaging in self-destructive behavior. This is an internal resource and shows itself through stamina, perseverance and choices. Mental--Having the mental abilities and acquired skills (reading, writing, computing) to deal with daily life. Physical--Having physical health and mobility. Support Systems--Having friends, family, backup resources and knowledge bases available to access in times of need. These are external resources. Role Models--Having frequent access to appropriate adults who are nurturing to the child and who do not engage in self-destructive behavior. Knowledge of Hidden Rules--Knowing the unspoken cues and habits of a group.

25 African American Affairs Institute
Our Vision We envision that African Americans in South Carolina will realize optimum quality of life. Our Mission Our mission is to build infrastructure and create institutions within the African American community and influence existing systems aimed at overcoming the effects of deprivation, poverty and discrimination. Okay, people are living in poverty and some systems need to change to address poverty. We realize that.

26 Dismantle The Pipeline!
The Cradle to Prison Pipeline ® Campaign Summit October 9 – 10th, 2009 Columbia, SC The Children’s Defense Fund’s Cradle to Prison Pipeline® Campaign is a national call to action to stop the funneling of tens of thousands of youth, predominantly minorities, down life paths that often lead to arrest, conviction, incarceration, and in some cases, death. Race and poverty are the major factors underpinning the Pipeline. The problems, policies and systems that feed the pipeline are a result of human choices. It's Time To Dismantle The Pipeline! Poverty is the key element that keeps children and families in poverty.

27 Video People Like Us: Social Class in America

28 S. C. Commission for Minority Affairs African American Affairs
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