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STRATEGIES FOR COURSE REDESIGN EVALUATION Laura M. Stapleton Human Development and Quantitative Methodology University of Maryland, College Park

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Presentation on theme: "STRATEGIES FOR COURSE REDESIGN EVALUATION Laura M. Stapleton Human Development and Quantitative Methodology University of Maryland, College Park"— Presentation transcript:

1 STRATEGIES FOR COURSE REDESIGN EVALUATION Laura M. Stapleton Human Development and Quantitative Methodology University of Maryland, College Park 1

2 Presentation Outline Goal of evaluation A proposed framework for evaluation Experimental design considerations Examples of what (and what not) to do Summary and recommendations 2

3 Goal of Evaluation …to provide useful information for judging decision alternatives, assisting an audience to judge and improve the worth of some educational program, and assisting the improvement of policies and programs (Stufflebeam, 1983) 3

4 Frameworks Summative-judgment orientation (Scriven, 1983) OR Improvement orientation (Stufflebeam, 1983) 4 The most important purpose of program evaluation is not to prove but to improve

5 Proposed Framework Stufflebeams CIPP framework for program evaluation Context Inputs Process Product Evaluation can encompass any or every one of these aspects 5

6 Context Evaluation What needs are addressed, how pervasive and important are they, and to what extent are the projects objectives reflective of assessed needs? What course is undergoing redesign? Why is it targeted for redesign? Are these reasons sufficient for the resource/time expenditure that redesign would require? Are there components of the traditional course that are good/important to keep? Does redesign represent potential benefits? 6

7 Input Evaluation What procedural plan was adopted to address the needs and to what extent was it a reasonable, potentially successful, and cost effective response to the assessed needs? Why were the specific redesign components selected? What else might have worked just as well? What are the costs of the chosen approach versus the costs of others (to all stakeholders)? 7

8 Process Evaluation To what extent was the project plan implemented, and how, and for what reasons did it have to be modified? Was each part of the plan in place? Did the components operate as expected? Did the expected behavioral change occur? How can implementation efforts be improved? 8

9 Product Evaluation What results were observed, how did the various stakeholders judge the worth and merit of the outcomes, and to what extent were the needs of the target population met? How did outcomes compare to past/traditional delivery? What were stakeholders opinions of the change? Were the cost/benefit advantages realized? Were there unintended consequences? 9

10 Proposed Framework Stufflebeams CIPP framework for program evaluation Context Inputs Process Product 10

11 Process Evaluation Strategies Observations Review of extant process data Focus groups Informal or formal feedback 11

12 Product Evaluation Strategies Qualitative review of judgments of stakeholders Quantitative comparison of measured outcomes Causal conclusions regarding quantitative outcomes depends on design (Campbell & Stanley, 1963) 12

13 Study Design 13 sample Group A Group B pre-test Re-designed Instruction Traditional Instruction post-test Pre-test post-test control group design with this design, you have strong support for a causal statement

14 Study Design 14 sample Group A Group B Re-designed Instruction Traditional Instruction post-test Post-test only control group design with this design, you have support for a causal statement, assuming students do not drop out differentially

15 Study Design 15 Group A Group B pre-test Re-designed Instruction Traditional Instruction post-test Non-equivalent control group design with this design, initial differences in the groups may explain differences (or lack of differences) in the outcomes

16 Study Design 16 Group A Group B Re-designed Instruction Traditional Instruction post-test Static group comparison / post-test only with non- equivalent groups with this design, initial differences in the groups may explain differences (or lack of differences) in the outcomes

17 Examples of what to do (and not do) UMBC Psychology Course Redesign Context: Low pass rates in PSYC100 course; student course evaluations were brutal Input: Delivery of PSYC100 course content altered Material on web; self-paced labs and quizzes Dyads within lecture hall with peer facilitators Lectures were more discussion based, including video and clicker questions Less time in lecture, more on self-paced on-line work 17

18 Examples of what to do (and not do) Process Evaluation (of redesign pilot) Lab utilization statistics Time lab completed (relative to exam and speed) Number of times quiz attempted Qualitative reaction from redesign section instructors Focus group comments from students Reactions from small groups in lectures What was working What was not working What changes would be helpful 18

19 Examples of what to do (and not do) Product Evaluation (of redesign pilot) Post-test Only Static Group Comparison Grade Distribution Redesign Traditional (same semester) Traditional (historical) Common Exam Redesign Traditional (same semester) Student Course Evaluations Redesign Traditional (same semester) 19

20 Summary Suggestions Identify a fairly independent evaluator now Determine what type of evaluation you need to undertake [which CIPP stage(s)?] Identify components of each (remember unintended consequences) Make it happen when it needs to happen! Be creative in considering sources of data Be flexible to change your evaluation plan mid-stream Think long-term as well as short-term 20

21 References Campbell, D.T. & Stanley, J. C. (1963). Experimental and Quasi- Experimental Designs for Research. Chicago, IL: Rand McNally & Company. Scriven, M. (1983). Evaluation ideologies. In Madaus, G. F., Scriven, M. & Stufflebeam, D. L. (Eds.) Evaluation Models, pp Hingham, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Stufflebeam, D. L. (1983). The CIPP model for program evaluation. In Madaus, G. F., Scriven, M. & Stufflebeam, D. L. (Eds.) Evaluation Models, pp Hingham, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers. 21

22 22 Thank you! Contact for info:


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