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© 2007 SRI International Workforce Creation and Adult Education Transition Council SRI Research Update October 7, 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2007 SRI International Workforce Creation and Adult Education Transition Council SRI Research Update October 7, 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2007 SRI International Workforce Creation and Adult Education Transition Council SRI Research Update October 7, 2008

2 © 2007 SRI International 2 Adult Learning System Goals Expand access to adult learning services –Provide more service options, make programs more flexible, improve technology, provide support services, and other supports for adults to access learning pathways. Enhance professional development –Enhance professional development for adult education providers and improve program capacity to serve adults most in need (for example, adults with disabilities). Link adult education to workforce opportunities –Improve transitions from adult education to postsecondary education and training and smooth transitions to high-demand career pathways.

3 © 2007 SRI International 3 Expand Access to Adult Learning WIA Title II target population includes individuals -- (A)Who have attained 16 years of age; (B)Who are not enrolled or required to be enrolled in secondary school under State law; and (C) who – i.Lack sufficient mastery of basic educational skills to function effectively in society ii.Do not have a secondary school diploma iii.Are unable to speak, read, or write the English language. Definition of Target Populations

4 © 2007 SRI International 4 Expand Access to Adult Learning According to the 2003 Maryland State Assessment of Adult Literacy (SAAL) – more than 360,000 adults have Below Basic prose and document literacy skills, –more than 760,000 adults have Below Basic quantitative literacy skills. Each year, less than 10% of adults with Below Basic prose and document literacy skills and less than 5% of adults with Below Basic quantitative skills participate in adult basic education (ABE, ASE, ESL) services. Each year, less than 10% of adults with Below Basic prose and document literacy skills and less than 5% of adults with Below Basic quantitative skills participate in adult basic education (ABE, ASE, ESL) services. Participation by Adults with Low Skills

5 © 2007 SRI International 5 Expand Access to Adult Learning The 2006 American Community Survey estimated that more than 500,000 adults (18 and over) in Maryland lacked a high school diploma, among these – –More than 320,000 were working age adults (18 to 64) –More than 20,000 were young adults (18-24). Maryland is just below the national average in the rate of participation in adult education (ABE, ASE, and ESL) by adults lacking a high school diploma. –During the school year, states ranged from a high of 22.7% (Florida) to a low of 4.2% (Texas) participation in adult education among working age adults without a HS diploma. –Maryland was in the middle at 9.2% (26 th among the 50 states). Participation by Adults with Less than High School

6 © 2007 SRI International 6 Expand Access to Adult Learning The 2005 American Community Survey estimated that more than 115,000 working age adults in Maryland (3.1%) speak English poorly or not at all. –National estimate is 5.5% of the working age adult population. Maryland is below the national average in the rate of participation in adult education by adults with limited English proficiency. –During the school year, states ranged from a high of 41.1% (Minnesota) to a low of 4.4% (Arizona) participation of adults with limited English proficiency. –Marylands rate of participation for limited English adults was 9% of the target population (35 th among the 50 states). Participation by Adults with Limited English

7 © 2007 SRI International 7 Expand Access to Adult Learning GoHigher Kentucky GoHigher Kentucky –Website-based campaign to provide information and resources to all students looking to attend college. –Includes strategies to increase adult learner transitions to postsecondary education. –In 2004, 22% of GED completers went on to postsecondary education (10% increase). –In 2005, 78% of adult students entered postsecondary education and training. –In 2008, GoHigher website received >6,000 new accounts, 3,595 requests for more information, and 1,210 people using the admissions application. Lessons Learned/ Best Practices

8 © 2007 SRI International 8 Enhance Professional Development Adult education programs funded with WIA Title II funding in Maryland in 2007 included: –11 community colleges (17,508 participants) –16 public school districts (8,071 participants) –6 community-based organizations, 2 government agencies, 1 county library (combined total of 3,235 participants) –17 correctional facilities (4,624 participants) The diversity of current adult education programs and program staff in Maryland presents challenges as well as opportunities for enhanced professional development and program improvement. –Low levels of funding and preponderance of part-time staff are major challenges. –Diversity of programs and of staff qualifications are strengths in face of need to provide services to adults with a wide range of learning needs. Program Scope and Diversity

9 © 2007 SRI International 9 Enhance Professional Development Marylands funding per adult education participant is relatively low compared to other states and varies widely across programs: –During the school year, state funding per participant ranged from a high of $1,955 (Vermont) to a low of $282 (South Carolina). –Marylands average rate of funding per participant was $433 (39 th out of 50 states – US average was $823 per participant). However, the relationship of funding to learning outcomes is difficult to determine. –Compared to other states, reported rates of NRS level gains in Maryland are above the national average. In , Maryland reported an overall NRS level completion rate of 47.4% (14 th out of 50 states, median for all states is 39.5%). –Current measures do not provide sufficient evidence to evaluate and compare adult learning and outcomes across programs. Funding and Outcomes

10 © 2007 SRI International 10 Enhance Professional Development Tennessee Adult Education Professional Development Framework and Tracking System Allows practitioners to document their professional development experiences and accumulate professional development points towards level designations and incentives. Levels 1-3 include training and required activities: lesson plans, evaluation/ observations, case studies, and portfolios Online professional development tools and worksheets Lessons Learned/ Best Practices

11 © 2007 SRI International 11 Link Adult Education to Workforce Opportunity The Education Needs Index (ENI) uses census data to estimate levels of educational need based on a combination of education factors, economic factors, market demand factors, and population factors. According to the ENI 2.0 (based on 2005 Public Use Microdata Samples) : –The areas of Maryland that have the most critical level of educational need are in Baltimore City and County and Prince Georges County. –The areas of Maryland that have the least critical level of educational need include all of Carroll, Frederick, and Howard Counties and parts of Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Hartford, and Montgomery Counties. An index such as the ENI (or a modified version of the ENI) that combines education, economic, market demand, and population factors can provide a valuable baseline and progress monitor for an integrated adult learning and workforce development system. Educational Needs Index

12 © 2007 SRI International 12 Link Adult Education to Workforce Opportunity Washington Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) (I-BEST) –Pairs ABE/ESL instructors with professional/technical instructors in the classroom to co-teach half of the time and teach the same students contextualized basic skills and job training separately the other half of the time. –Creates a clear pathway for students to obtain a credential and enter a career –Provides financial aid for non-traditional students. –Shortens the length of time it takes to earn a credential by integrating basic skills into technical and higher education and providing dual credit. –Provides guidance and support for students. –Creates open entry/open exit options. –Engages businesses and focuses on high-demand jobs. Lessons Learned/ Best Practices

13 © 2007 SRI International 13 Link Adult Education to Workforce Opportunity Ohio: Career-Technical Transitions Initiative Program and system alignments between the adult education and higher education to create a more seamless system for adult learners to transition to postsecondary education. –Career-Technical to Credit Project Approach: articulation agreements between adult/secondary career technical courses and state supported institutions of higher education. –Learning outcomes based on industry standards (focus on Nursing, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Technology, Information Technology – Networking, Medical Assisting, and Automotive Technology) –Four Stackable Certificates: Prep program – below 8th grade math and/or English; Entry level certificate – between 8th grade and GED level; Intermediate certificate – two levels of developmental education with college credit; and Advanced certificate – one level of developmental education with one year of college credit) Lessons Learned/ Best Practices


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