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1 Allendales Counter- Response SM Model and the Power of Looking Within : Application in School Environments 2007 Conference on Best Practices & Guidelines.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Allendales Counter- Response SM Model and the Power of Looking Within : Application in School Environments 2007 Conference on Best Practices & Guidelines."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Allendales Counter- Response SM Model and the Power of Looking Within : Application in School Environments 2007 Conference on Best Practices & Guidelines for Non-public Special Education Programs – Division of Special Education, ISBE November 30, 2007 Presenters: Dr. Pat Taglione, Mary Shahbazian, & Lisa West The Allendale Association

2 2 Overview QI Structure – Data Collection and Evidence-Based Practice Introduction to Counter-Response SM and the LSCI principles of the Double Struggle, Conflict Cycle, and Timeline Implementation Model and Staff Training

3 3 LSCI Institute founded in 1997, currently has 28 National Training sites as well as utilization in Europe and New Zealand; Allendale Association is a National Training Site.LSCI Institute founded in 1997, currently has 28 National Training sites as well as utilization in Europe and New Zealand; Allendale Association is a National Training Site. Life Space Crisis Intervention Overview LSCI: developed by Long and Wood, based on original work of Fritz Redl, for settings specific to specialized E/BD educational environments.LSCI: developed by Long and Wood, based on original work of Fritz Redl, for settings specific to specialized E/BD educational environments.

4 4 The Double Struggle The Conflict Cycle The Time-Line LSCI Served as the Springboard for the Development of Allendales Counter-Response Training Program. The following concepts were expanded upon to create the CR model:

5 5 Double Struggle LSCI Intervention May inadvertently escalate the youths behavior Youth is no longer the central focus of the crisis Resolve youth crisis while addressing the issue of adult behavior during a crisis Double Struggle: adult takes the youths acting-out behavior personally, and ultimately reacts emotionally as well (Long, 1990)

6 6 Expansion of Double Struggle Concept in the Development of Counter-Response SM Training Counter-Aggression: angry feelings generated in adults when confronted with aggressive or non-compliant behavior on the part of the youth Counter-Indulgence: fearful or overly sympathetic feelings generated in adults when confronted with aggressive behavior or pleas for indulgence on the part of the youth LSCI emphasizes the concept of counter-aggression Counter-Response SM Training includes the concepts of both counter-aggression and counter-indulgence

7 7 Fight or Flight Response to Stress – ones inherent physiological reaction to a crisis or unconditioned aversive stimulus Counter-Aggression Counter-Indulgence = Fight Response = Flight Response Type of Counter-Response

8 8 COUNTER-AGGRESSION (Fight Syndrome) CHANGE UNDERSTAND Lack of Balance

9 9 COUNTER-INDULGENCE (Flight Syndrome) CHANGE UNDERSTAND Lack of Balance

10 10 THE KEY IS BALANCE… UNDERSTAND CHANGE

11 11 Counter - Indulgence Aggression Aggression Transfer/Discharge Treatment Trap

12 12 Splitting SPLITTING

13 13 When people work together to manage their own counter- response and thereby eliminate splitting - the focus is back on the youth which provides the opportunity for change to occur CONSENSUS YOUTH

14 14 What is a Counter-Response? Response That Counters the Other Persons Behavior Response Driven by our Emotions

15 15 Counter-Response A. Other Persons Behavior – acts as trigger (Stage 4 of the conflict cycle) B. Your Emotional Reaction From the other person C. Your Counter-Response Behavior From your past To avoid feeling your emotional reaction

16 16 Projection Kids project their feelings onto the adults in an attempt to get rid of these feelings

17 17 Projective Identification Kids Get Us To Feel Their Feelings via nonverbal behaviors Right Brain-to-Right Brain communication …People induce those closest to them to behave in prescribed ways. It is as if one individual forces another to play a role in the enactment of that persons internal drama – one involving early object relationships… An individual unconsciously projects a part of the self into another human being as a means of converting an inner struggle…into an external one. (Cashdan, 1988)

18 18 We may project someone from our past onto the kids Our Own Projections

19 19 Often we respond with some behavior as a way to try to manage these feelings We call thisCOUNTER-RESPONSE

20 20 Our Response to the Youths Behavior is the Only Thing We Have Control Over ~ Thus the Only Thing That We Can Change Thus the Only Thing That We Can Change

21 21 We call this The Power of Looking Within versus Fighting the Enemy Out There (Senge, 1990) (Senge, 1990)

22 22 The Cure Lies in Your Relationship with Your Enemy (Senge, 1990, p.67) Once You Have Identified and Managed Your Counter-Response

23 23 II. Conflict Cycle/Re-Enactment (Repetition Compulsion II. Conflict Cycle/Re-Enactment (Repetition Compulsion)

24 24 The Conflict Cycle 2StressfulEvent Attachment Model View of Self & Others 3YouthsFeelings 4YouthsBehaviors 5Adult/YouthReactions Relational Trauma Re-Enactment meaning of behavior/ youths conflict Trauma History Trauma History (Feelings Behavior) (Wood & Long, 1991) Modified

25 25 Implicit Memory (Procedural) Explicit Memory (Semantic/Episodic) Left Brain (Verbal) Right Brain (Nonverbal) (Siegel, 1999) Understanding Re-Enactment Conflict Cycle) (Conflict Cycle)

26 26 Implicit & Explicit Memory If brains ability to translate an implicit memory into explicit memory (right brain to left brain) has been blocked Memory is triggered in right brain (implicit memory) without any awareness (explicit memory) that a memory is being triggered Instead of feeling like one is remembering a past event, the individual feels that he or she is actually in the event (Siegel, 1999)

27 27 Client remembers nothing (at least not consciously), but expresses it in action Repetition Compulsion (Conflict Cycle) The compulsion to repeat…replaces the impulse to remember The repetitive behavior will persist until the meaning of the behavior comes into consciousness Memories that have been denied and paradoxically preserved through acting-out symptoms need to be translated into conscious recollection ( i.e., explicit memory) (Freud 1914/2003) Aim of repetition compulsion – not to master conflict but to avoid painful memories and feelings (Masterson, 1981)

28 28 Kids & the Repetition Compulsion They dont remember the conflict(s) they have repressed but instead keep repeating it in their behavior without being aware that they are doing this (Freud, 1914/2001) The goal of this behavior (repeating a pattern of behavior over and over again) is to avoid memory and experience of painful feelings (Masterson, 1981) Why do kids do the same thing over and over again even if it doesnt seem to work for them?

29 29 Interrupting the Conflict Cycle (or the Repetition Compulsion) Cognitive-Behavioral - opportunity to learn new skills Neurobiology - opportunity to: integrate right brain with left brain (more integrated representations) make implicit memory explicit (bring those memories into awareness) create new neural pathways Psychodynamic – opportunity to : replace repeated acting-out by putting feelings into words create a coherent narrative (make sense of ones experiences) Attachment – opportunity to: make sense of ones experience within a secure attachment

30 30 Knowledge of the Youths Conflict Cycle and Awareness of Our Counter- Response (Double Struggle) Enable adult to understand the source of the adult s feelings that the youth has created or induced in the adult Help adult not to automatically act on one s own feelings Enable adult to keep one s feelings from dictating how one should behave and to make decisions on what one believes would be helpful to this youth at this time (Wood & Long, 1991)

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35 35 III. Timeline/Coherent Narrative

36 36 Developing Coherent Narrative via the Time Line Discover, by listening and benign questioning, the youths perception of the situation (Understanding) Encourage youth to tell his/her story and feel understood and accepted (Understanding) Help youth learn to make sense of his/her experience in a way that integrates the reality of the situation (Change)

37 37 Help youth connect a feeling to a Connect feelings to behavior as youth behavior; then youth is less likely is actually experiencing the feeling as to act out this feeling in destructive a result of the interruption of his/her behavior conflict cycle Translate implicit memory (NV) into explicit memory (V) LSCI CR Training Decoding Coherent Narrative As youth is exposed to feelings and memories that the youth has been able to avoid by re-enacting his/her conflict cycle, the youth is able to face his/her unpleasant reality and make sense of ones experience by verbalizing with a caring adult

38 38 LSCI Concepts of Double Struggle, Conflict Cycle, & Time Line Double Struggle Counter-Response Conflict Cycle Conflict Cycle Relational Trauma Re-Enactment (Attachment Style) Time Line Time Line Coherent Narrative

39 39 CR INTERVENTIONS Counter-Response Be aware of it Dont act on it Manage the feeling Identify hero/villain roles Re-Enactment Interrupt it Dont re-enact it Face unpleasant reality Balance Und/Chg - Do something different Coherent Narrative Help youth make sense of ones experience (Double Struggle) (Conflict Cycle) (Timeline) splitting

40 40 Implementation and QI Structure Staff Training Data collection Feedback Loop

41 41 Allendale CR Training SM Implementation Model Didactic Presentation – School-wide Group Format (At all levels of the school, including administrative, supervisory, and pupil support services) Application and Follow-up Classroom Team-Based Individualized Treatment Planning Parent and Classroom Conflict Cycle-Focused Dialogue Meeting Individual Counter-Response Training for Professional Development Community-Based Emergency Responders (Police, Paramedics); Public School Educational Staff; Clinical Supervisors; Psychologist, Social Workers, and Other Mental Health Professionals Dealing with Traumatized Youth; Conflictual Couples Individual Counter-Response Training for Staff Corrective Action Engagement through Parent Clinical Consultation

42 42 QI Structure Data collection Identification of students conflict cycle and tracking of manifested behaviors (truancy, noncompliance, aggression, self-harm, etc.) – creates evidence for informed decision making. Level of positive engagement (attendance, interest in extracurricular activities, grades/credit earnings, etc.) Level of parent engagement Annual academic progress Feedback Loop Data collection continually informs treatment process and treatment goals, provides evidence of the effectiveness of interventions, or lack thereof to support the adults in determining what to do differently.


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