Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Transition Practices Self Assessment: Supporting Districts with the Effective Implementation of Transition Planning and Practices The purpose of this training.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Transition Practices Self Assessment: Supporting Districts with the Effective Implementation of Transition Planning and Practices The purpose of this training."— Presentation transcript:

1 Transition Practices Self Assessment: Supporting Districts with the Effective Implementation of Transition Planning and Practices The purpose of this training is to increase understanding of how to implement transition best practices by (1) focusing on the student and his or her development (2) involving family (3) utilizing resources and services from outside agencies and (4) modifying program structure and attributes so that the transition process is a coordinated program which supports the student’s post-school goals. Key Learning: Be familiar with the basic transition legal requirements that guide implementation of best practices. Recognize and utilize student-focused tools that will help students’ discover their goals, strengths, needed supports and guide them to self-direct their IEP meeting.  Understand the importance of infusing self-determination into the curriculum and methods of doing so. Recognize program structural changes that may need to occur in order to make transition the centerpiece of the IEP for a transition-age student. Identify your own priorities for modifying service delivery to transition-age students. Establish a work plan that addresses each priority area and the action steps for making changes. The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services (OSERS) defines transition as “a bridge between the security and structure offered by the school and the opportunities and risks of adult life” (Will, 1984). Ideally, transition is the guiding focus of every secondary IEP (Kohler, 1996, 1998: Wehman, 1992, 2001; Clark & Kolstoe, 1995). What will the student do on the day after graduation? How will this student arrive at his/her goals? Together we will help drive the process using a team method, with the IEP as a tool. This is not new information! A key to successful transition is to address the complex support needs that adolescents with disabilities require. (Morningstar, M.E., Kleinhammer-Trammill, P.J. & Lattin, D.L., 1999) Planning is an important component of this process across grade levels and on to adulthood. 2009 Special Education Directors’ Conference August 6, 2009 Presented by: Diane Morrison, Ed.D. Loyola University Chicago School of Education Susan Walter Transition Consultant Illinois State Board of Education or

2 Purpose of the TPSA Self assessment and reporting tool allows districts and/or special education cooperatives to: Reflect on research-based transition practices and current status of implementation Use a data-based decision-making model to identify priorities for modifying, updating, or infusing transition planning and service delivery. Based on the work of Dr. Paula Kohler in Taxonomy for Transition Programming Kohler, P Taxonomy for Transition Programming. Challenges Based on the work of Dr. Paula Kohler, Taxonomy for Transition Programming, the TPSA is a self-assessment and reporting tool to be used by school districts and/or buildings to: Reflect on research-based transition practices and current status of implementation Use a data-based decision-making model to identify priorities for modifying, updating, or infusing transition planning and service delivery. The TPSA has been designed to assist school districts: in determining their current practices, engaging in collaborative planning, setting priorities and developing action steps for the school improvement plan (SIP), and in efforts to access technical assistance and training available through the IL State Technical Assistance Center (ISTAC) (i.e., the TPSA is the first component in a process to access to on-site technical assistance and training). Challenges – a team approach is essential to success…research indicates that the strongest predictor of successful implementation of transition best practice is the existence of a school-based interagency transition team that represents all stakeholders.

3 Why are Research-Based Practices so important to transition planning?
Outcomes for students with disabilities improve with transition-focused education. Collaboration between educators, families, students, community members and organizations Adult outcomes focus Academic, career and extracurricular instruction and activities Variety of instructional and transition approaches Responsive to local context and students’ learning and support needs Transition planning is the fundamental basis of education that guides development of student’s educational programs. Not an “add-on” activity when students reach 14 ½ Kohler, P. (1996)

4 The Taxonomy for Transition Programming Interagency Collaboration
Student-Focused Planning IEP Development Student Participation Planning Strategies Family Involvement Family Training Family Empowerment Lecture Notes: This diagram of the taxonomy for transition programming provides an overview of the major elements that need to be in place to provide high-quality transition programs for youths with disabilities. It is based on research conducted by Dr. Paula Kohler while she was at the Transition Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This framework was developed as a result of examining practices and outcomes and surveying transition project directors, researchers, teachers, other educators and service providers and asking them to identify and rank the importance of practices that contribute to successful transition programming. In conclusion… It is important to remember that transition programming and planning is an on-going, dynamic, ever-changing process and therefore implies a mode of continual learning. Likewise, it is important to realize that this assessment and implementation process does not end as teams will be constantly re-evaluating priorities and modifying programs accordingly. Thank you! Please fill out and return the evaluation form. Program Structure Program Philosophy Program Policy Strategic Planning Program Evaluation Resource Allocation Human Resource Development Student Development Life skills Instruction Career & Vocational Curricula Structured Work Experience Assessment Support Services Interagency Collaboration Collaborative Framework Collaborative Service Delivery Kohler, P.D. (1996). Taxonomy for transition planning. Champaign: University of Illinois

5 Program Structure and Attributes
Program structures and attributes are features that relate to efficient and effective delivery of transition-focused education and services, including attributes of a school that provide the framework for a transition perspective. By operating from the transition paradigm, schools put in place those structures and policies that reflect the notion that outcomes and activities of 100% of the students are important. Lecture Notes:  Instruct participants to retrieve the Program Structure and Attributes section of the assessment. A school’s program structure guides effective delivery of transition services. Good program structure will facilitate the supports, resources, collaboration and information dissemination that best practices require. “By operating from the transition paradigm, schools put in place those structures and policies that reflect the notion that outcomes and activities of 100% of the students are important.” This statement shows a parallel between a transition paradigm and aspects of the NCLB legislation. Administrative support: The support and involvement of administrators is frequently cited as a key element of successful transition programs. It is important to gain administrative support so as to ensure an atmosphere where key program attributes are considered important across general and special educational climates. For example, self-determination, educational accessibility, and disability and cultural sensitivity are all aspects of a school environment that administration can support with program structure and faculty and staff can infuse into curriculum. Interagency Collaboration: The program structure must provide for a level of interagency collaboration where the student’s needs, preferences and interests lie in the center and family, school personnel, and adult and related service providers provide the supports to facilitate attainment of post-school goals and agency linkages. Kohler, P. (1996). Retrieved on November 2, 2003 from

6 Interagency Collaboration
Interagency collaboration practices facilitate involvement of community businesses, organizations and agencies in all aspects of transition – focused education. Interagency agreements that clearly articulate roles, responsibilities, communication strategies, and other collaborative actions that enhance curriculum and program development foster collaboration. Lecture Notes:  Instruct participants to retrieve the Interagency Collaboration section of the self-assessment. No single agency has all of the necessary resources to adequately meet the needs of persons with disabilities. It is only through a concerted effort of interagency and interdisciplinary collaboration that a full continuum of services can be ensured. Interagency collaboration is critical in the transition planning process! Kohler, P. (1996). Retrieved on November 2, 2003 from

7 Student-Focused Planning
Student-focused planning practices focus on using assessment information and facilitating students’ self-determination to develop individual education programs based on student’s post-school goals. Lecture Notes: Review the key terms in the definition of student-focused planning. Assessment: Assessing student needs, strengths, preferences and interests remains at the forefront of the transition planning process. Provides a basis for planning. Provides information to evaluate student progress and program effectiveness. The student and family should play a role in deciding the type of assessment information that will be collected and how it will be used. Self- Determination is a key concept in student-focused planning. Self-determination: should be promoted through the process used to develop the plan and through the content that is included in the plan. Facilitates students’ learning that they do have a say in their future and the skills they need to convey their goals Necessitates that student involvement is at the heart of quality transition planning Post-school goals: The student’s post-school goals will drive the transition planning process. Kohler, P. (1996). Retrieved on November 2, 2003 from

8 Student Development Student development practices emphasize life, employment and occupational skill development through school-based and work-based learning experiences. Students’ assessment and accommodations provide the fundamental basis for student development that results in successful transition. Lecture Notes:  Instruct participants to retrieve the Student Development portion of the self-assessment. While a coordinated team effort, the development of strong interagency linkages and the provision of quality adult services are key components to creating successful transition from school to adult life, students must also be properly prepared – they must develop the essential skills for adult living (including employment, postsecondary education and community living) and participating in their transition process. Kohler, P. (1996). Retrieved on November 2, 2003 from

9 Family Involvement Family involvement practices are associated with parent and family involvement in planning and delivering education and transition services, including facilitating such involvement. Family-focused training and family empowerment activities increase the ability of family members to work effectively with educators and other service providers and vice-versa. Lecture Notes: Instruct participants to retrieve the Family Involvement portion of the assessment. Positive student outcomes rely heavily on the collaboration between the public agency, the community, adult service providers, and post-secondary education providers. However, without the coordinated efforts of families, student outcomes will be adversely affected. Research has shown that active family involvement in the transition planning process is a direct link to best practice implementation. Kohler, P. (1996). Retrieved on November 2, 2003 from

10 How was the TPSA developed?
Partnership Illinois State Board of Education/IS-TAC and Loyola University Chicago – Center for School Evaluation, Intervention & Training Developing, refining and validating the TPSA Using the Kohler Transition Taxonomy and a four question evaluation framework If you train, do people implement? If they implement, do they do so with fidelity? If they implement with fidelity, do the interventions sustain? If the interventions sustain, what is the impact on your clients? Alignment process data sources, level (e.g., system, practice, data), and the Kohler Taxonomy State Performance Plan Validity checks - internal and external

11 Protocol for Completing the TPSA
Who completes the TPSA? Recommended – assemble a district and/or school-based interagency transition team (if one doesn’t already exist) In lieu of or in addition to interagency transition team: All staff at a staff meeting (goal of 40 % of all staff) Individuals from a representative group (e.g., Interagency Transition Team or Transition Planning Committee (TPC) Team member-led focus group (e.g., consensus with one score for the group) Random selection of up to 10 people within the school , based on demographics (e.g., 2 administrators, 3 general educators, 2 special educators, 1 support staff, 1 community/agency, 1 family member/student)

12 Protocol for Completing the TPSA
When and how often should the TPSA be completed? At least annually and preferably at the same time each year (e.g., beginning of school year, end of school year) How is the TPSA completed? Demographic data Who? (e.g., team consensus, team individuals, all staff etc.) Data are entered into a web-based information management system administered by Loyola Reports are generated

13 How will the TPSA support schools?
Support for Indicator 13 improvement Assists school districts in determining current practices and setting priorities Internal decision-making Building awareness of staff Action planning to “scale up” transition practices, service delivery and collaborative planning Assessment of change over time Team validation Accessing transition-specific technical assistance and training through ISBE and the Statewide Technical Assistance Center (IS-TAC)

14 Getting Started Recommendation – Assemble a Team
CRITICAL COMPONENT School-based interagency transition team Extension or sub-committee of existing school/district leadership team Represent ALL stakeholders Students and families Teachers, transition personnel and support staff Administrators Community agencies and advocacy representatives Vocational rehabilitation counselors and adult agency personnel Lecture Notes: Now that your school/community has committed to implementing transition best practices, the first step is to assemble a team. As you now know, there are many components and intricacies to successful transition planning and service delivery. One person can not effectively coordinate all of the planning and activities for a student. In fact, research indicates that the strongest predictor of successful implementation of transition best practice is the existence of a school-based interagency transition team that represents all stakeholders.

15  Using Your TPSA Data  Strategic Planning
Critical questions should be answered with respect to the implementation of evidenced-based transition services.

16 Weaknesses Opportunities Threats Strengths SWOT SWOT Analysis is a strategic planning method used to evaluate strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats revealed through the self-assessment (TPSA). SWOT Analysis process is from Dr. David Bell, St. Xavier University, Chicago

17 In order for change to occur, the driving forces (strengths) must exceed the opposing forces (weaknesses) thus shifting the balance of power or equilibrium (Lewin, 1948)

18 Using the TPSA to conduct a SWOT analysis
Current TPSA has 35 statements Program Structure (PS), 6 Collaboration (COLAB), 5 Student-Focused Planning (SFP), 11 Student Development (SD), 8 Family Involvement, (FI), 5 Review the TPSA reports for each section. Program structures (e.g., supports and services) are features that relate to efficient and effective delivery of transition-focused education and services, including philosophy, planning, policy, evaluation, and human resource development. Collaboration practices facilitate involvement of community businesses, organizations, and agencies in all aspects of transition-related education. Collaboration is fostered by interagency agreements that clearly articulate roles, responsibilities, communication strategies, and other collaborative actions that enhance curriculum and program development. Student-focused planning practices focus on using assessment information and facilitating students’ self-determination to develop individual education programs based on students’ post-school goals. Student development practices emphasize life, employment, and occupational skill development through school-based and work-based teaming experiences. Family involvement practices are associated with parent and family involvement in planning and delivering education and transition services, including facilitating such involvement. Family involvement should be evident often and as early as possible for all students.

19

20

21

22 Using the TPSA to conduct a SWOT analysis
PHASE 1- Analyze the TPSA as whole and compare to the table in the following slide.

23 Using the TPSA to conduct a SWOT analysis
Implementation Level Range “Maintaining” 4.0 – 3.5 “Achieved” 3.5 – 2.5 “In Progress” 2.5 – 1.5 “Not Started” 1.5 – 1.0

24 Using the TPSA to conduct a SWOT analysis
PHASE 2- Analyze the subsections Use the “Tally” report that states the number of in-place items for each sub-section

25 Using the TPSA to conduct a SWOT analysis
Practice Area (e.g., Program Structure, Collaboration, Student-Focused Planning, Student Development, Family Involvement) Range “Maintaining” 4.0 – 3.5 “Achieved” 3.5 – 2.5 “In Progress” 2.5 – 1.5 “Not Started” 1.5 – 1.0

26 Using the TPSA for Action Planning
Analyze subsections to determine Areas of celebration (top three items in place per sub-section) Areas of need (top priority items ranked as highest need)

27 Using the TPSA to conduct a SWOT analysis
Understand facilitators and barriers that impact sustainable change SWOT the various subsections

28 SWOT Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
What does your school do well? Weaknesses What does the school not do well? What resources are missing that can improve the operation? Opportunities What internal and external opportunities are open to the school that can minimize or eliminate the identified weaknesses and or threats? Threats What are the barriers (internal or external to the school) that impact your ability to address your weaknesses? What are the threats if the weaknesses are not addressed?

29 Example Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
Student data/information from person-centering planning, student and family interviews and other age-appropriate transition assessments are used to develop future plans, e.g., IEP transition plan components Weaknesses Current student experiences are not community-based Opportunities We have strong community partners who are willing to support students. Staff ranked this as a high priority on the TPSA. Threats We do not have time to develop formal partnerships.

30 Discussion Questions Are there weaknesses that are beyond your control? Do the opportunities available to the school outweigh the threats/barriers? How can you build the capacity to address your weaknesses? What resources (human, financial, etc) are available or needed to address your weaknesses?

31 Action Planning Transition Practice Task Person Responsible When
Assessment TPSA – SFP7 The transition plan reflects active participation of post-school agencies with students, families and school (e.g. rehabilitation services, mental health, developmental disabilities, health, post-secondary education, generic community service agencies) Administration reviews current roles of school counselor to determine of additional FTE can be reallocated to support developing partnerships. Check school improvement plan for next steps for community involvement School Team Administration Spring, 2010 Change in Role/FTE District Improvement Plan

32 Action Planning for Change
Process repeats until you have developed a systematic plan to address the various subsections on the TPSA

33 Questions/Answers

34 High achievement always takes place in the framework
Jack Kinder. High achievement always takes place in the framework of high expectation.

35 N othing will ever be attempted
if all possible objections must be first overcome. Samuel Johnson.

36 Acknowledgements Dr. Hank Bohanon, Diane Morrison and Agnes Kielian at Loyola University Chicago – Center for School Evaluation, Intervention and Training Dr. Paula Kohler, Western Michigan University Dr. David Bell, St. Xavier University, Chicago Illinois State Board of Education, Special Education Services Administration


Download ppt "Transition Practices Self Assessment: Supporting Districts with the Effective Implementation of Transition Planning and Practices The purpose of this training."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google