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RTI Module 4 INTERVENTIONS 1 Module 3 Review and Module 4 Link to Previous RTI Modules Karen Jones Education Associate Delaware Department of Education.

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Presentation on theme: "RTI Module 4 INTERVENTIONS 1 Module 3 Review and Module 4 Link to Previous RTI Modules Karen Jones Education Associate Delaware Department of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 RTI Module 4 INTERVENTIONS

3 1 Module 3 Review and Module 4 Link to Previous RTI Modules Karen Jones Education Associate Delaware Department of Education

4 2 2 Review of Homework Observed school- based teams in action, interview staff Used the Homework tool provided to evaluate the status of your teams. Discussion

5 3 3 Problem Solving Process Problem Identification & Problem Analysis Strategy/ Intervention Design Strategy/ Intervention Implementation Strategy/ Intervention Evaluation Follow-up and Re-design Gravois, IC Teams, 2008

6 4 4 Problem Solving Process Problem Identification & Problem Analysis Strategy/ Intervention Design Academic: Conducted under instructionally matched conditions Effective instructional practices (modeling, repetition, corrective feedback, incentives for improvement) Plan for progress monitoring Behavior: Conducted under instructionally matched conditions Application of researched behavior principles Contingency management Plan for progress monitoring Gravois, IC Teams, 2008

7 5 5 Problem Solving Process Problem Identification & Problem Analysis Strategy/ Intervention Design Strategy/ Intervention Implementation Implementation integrity must be considered Gravois, IC Teams, 2008

8 6 6 Problem Solving Process Problem Identification & Problem Analysis Strategy/ Intervention Design Strategy/ Intervention Implementation Strategy/ Intervention Evaluation Charting and graphing of data (at least weekly) Continued comparison of data with baseline and goals Gravois, IC Teams, 2008

9 7 7 Problem Solving Process Problem Identification & Problem Analysis Strategy/ Intervention Design Strategy/ Intervention Implementation Strategy/ Intervention Evaluation Follow-up and Re-design - Recognition that refinement and tweaking are necessary parts of effective problem solving Gravois, IC Teams, 2008

10 8 Problem Solving Continues with Guiding Questions 1. Is the core program sufficient? 2. If the core program is not sufficient, why isnt it? 3. How will needs identified in the core be addressed? 4. How will the effectiveness and efficiency of the core be monitored over time? 5. Have improvements to the core been effective? Sharon Kurns, Heartland Area Education Agency 11

11 9 Problem Solving Continues with Guiding Questions 6. For which students is the core program not sufficient and why? 7. What specific strategic and intensive instruction/intervention is needed? 8. Will the instruction/intervention be developed and selected through assessment, then matched with the function of target academic or behavior of each student? 9. How will strategic and intensive instruction/intervention be delivered? 10. How will effectiveness of strategic and intensive instruction/intervention be monitored? Sharon Kurns, Heartland Area Education Agency 11

12 10 Intervention Design What is our plan to address the problem ? What is the desired outcome of the intervention? What are we going to do to achieve that outcome? How will we know if the plan is working? How will we know if the plan is being implemented as intended? What do we do if the plan works or does not work? Sharon Kurns, Kristi Upah & Sandy Nelson, Heartland Area Education Agency 11

13 11 Intervention Progress Monitoring Is the student making sufficient progress given the intervention? Are the supports in place to carry out the measurement strategy? How will data be displayed? Are data being collected frequently and regularly? Is the intervention creating the desired outcomes? What changes might need to be made to the intervention? Sharon Kurns and Kristi Upah, Heartland Area Education Agency 11

14 12 Implementation Integrity Is the intervention being implemented as planned? What are the essential elements of the intervention? What is the acceptable level of performance? Or how will we know if the intervention is being implemented with integrity? How will integrity data be collected? Is integrity data being collected as planned? How will the integrity data be analyzed? Are adjustments to implementation necessary? (Make Decision) Alecia Rahn and Sharon Kurns, Heartland Area Education Agency 11

15 13 Evaluation Decisions Has the intervention been successful? Should the intervention be evaluated? Is the student making progress at an expected rate? Is the students performance significantly discrepant from peers or expectations? What are the students instructional needs? What are the students ongoing instructional needs and what resources will be needed to meet them? (Make the decision.) Sharon Kurns, Randy Allision, Jeff Grimes, Kristi Upah, Heartland Area Education Agency 11

16 14 Bibliography Heartland Area Education Agency 11, Improving Childrens Educational Results Through Data-Based Decision-Making. Johnston, Iowa http://www.aea11.k12.ia.us:16080/idm/

17 15 Module 4 Overview Juley Harper ELA Education Associate Delaware Department of Education

18 16 RTI makes me feel like… Because…

19 17 A mistake we often make in education… plan the curriculum materials very carefully arrange all the instructional materials open the doors of the school and then… find, to our dismay, that theyve sent us the wrong kids. ANON

20 18 An Intervention Is NOT Moving the student to another seat Referring the student to special education Adjusting the level of questions on an assessment Teaching the core curriculum Retaining the student Simply observing the student in the classroom Suspending the student Allowing the student to use a calculator Information based on research from Karen Burggraf, MEd and Arden Sotomayor, MEd, 2007

21 19 An Intervention IS A scientifically researched-based program used IN ADDITION to the core curriculum to help students with significant deficits reach proficiency. Information based on research from Karen Burggraf, MEd and Arden Sotomayor, MEd, 2007

22 20 Effective Interventions Why must we work at the school level to provide effective interventions? Children enter school with diverse instructional needs (e.g., talent, preparation for learning, oral language knowledge and abilities, motivation) Some children require instruction 4 or 5 times more intense than others The classroom teacher, alone, may not be able to provide sufficiently powerful instruction to meet the needs of all students Based on Research completed by the Florida Center for Reading Research, Elizabeth Crawford and Joseph Torgeson, 2006

23 21 Effective Intervention Characteristics They… increase the intensity of instruction increase instructional time decrease number of children in instructional group improve quality of instruction provide many opportunities for pre-teaching, re- teaching, review, and supervised practice are focused carefully on the most essential learning needs of the students provide instruction that is both EXPLICIT and SYSTEMATIC Based on Research completed by the Florida Center for Reading Research, Elizabeth Crawford and Joseph Torgeson, 2006

24 22 Common Traits of Successful Schools 1. Strong Leadership 2. Positive Belief and Teacher Dedication 3. Data Utilization and Analysis 4. Effective Scheduling 5. Professional Development 6. Scientifically-Based Intervention Programs 7. Parental Involvement Based on Research completed by the Florida Center for Reading Research, Elizabeth Crawford and Joseph Torgeson, 2006

25 23 Sophistication of Knowledge

26 24 RTI Interventions Behavior Brian Touchette Delaware Department of Education

27 25 Positive Behavior Support All Students in the School Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response School-wide Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive Intensive academic support School based adult mentors Intensive social skills training Individualized function based behavior support plans Parent training and collaboration Multi-agency collaboration (wrap around) Alternatives to suspension and expulsion Intensive social skills training and support Self-management programs School-based adult mentors (check-in) Increased academic support & practice Alternatives to school suspension Effective academic support Teaching social skills Teaching school-wide expectations Active supervision in common areas Positive reinforcement for all Firm fair, corrective discipline Effective Classroom management

28 26 If: >40% of students received 1+ODR >2.5 ODR per student Then: Need to consider modifying universal supports to improve overall system (teach, precorrect, & positively reinforce expected behaviors) If: >60% of referrals come from classroom >50% of ODR come from <10% of classrooms Then:Need to consider enhancing universal or targeted classroom management practices (examine academic engagement & success; teacher, pre-correct for, & positively reinforce expected classroom behavior & routines If: >35% of referrals come from non-classroom settings >15% of students referred from non-classroom settings Then: Need to consider enhancing universal behavior management practices (teach, precorrect for, & positively reinforce behavior & routines; increase active supervision in non-classroom settings (move, scan, interact) Sugai, 2004 Interventions at Tier 1

29 27 Functional Assessment Pathway Setting Event Triggering Event or Antecedent Problem Behavior Maintaining Consequence THE FUNCTION Get something Get away from Something

30 Example of Behavioral Pathway Setting Event Antecedent Behavior Consequence Alone for Given Math Profanity Gets out of 30+ minutes or other task disruption completing work Start of summary: When given math worksheets & other assignments, Caesar does not do his work, he uses profanity & disrupts lessons, especially, when he has worked alone for 30 minutes without peer contact. His work does not get completed, & he avoids teachers requests.

31 29 Characteristics of quality interventions Seen as feasible and acceptable Involve progress monitoring, fidelity checks Based on collaboration with family Based on effective intervention principles (evidence-based) Address prevention, teaching, and consequences

32 30 Characteristics of Quality Interventions Preventive Make the behavior irrelevant. Change the environment so its not necessary Teaching – make the behavior inefficient Teach a replacement skill that works better Function/Consequence Make the behavior ineffective. Remove reinforcement of the problem behavior. Maximize reinforcement of the replacement behavior Academic Considerations

33 31 Targeted Interventions: Some examples Skill Building Academic Organizational Social Anger management Problem-solving and conflict resolution Coping strategies Support/relationship Building Check In programs Mentoring (with adults or peers) Peer tutoring (with target student as tutor) Cooperative learning activities Breakfast/lunch clubs Student leadership opportunities

34 Innovations Examples

35 33 Universal Screening Workshop – April 23 rd This training is designed to help you IDENTIFY students who may need additional mental health/behavioral intervention. It is not designed to help you provide these services. Ask teams the following questions: Do you believe that your SW system is in place and functioning well (that is, fewer than 20% of kids in the upper tiers & data are being used effectively to modify the SW program) If so, do you feel you have a good problem solving structure in place when kids are identified as having social emotional and behavior problems? If so, do you feel there are mental health services available either in school or in your local community? If so, you may be ready to consider how you are identifying kids in need and whether you are reaching them as quickly and efficiently as possible…this training is for you. Summer Training for PBS on all levels of interventions – www.delawarepbs.org Paid Commercial Advertisement

36 Recognition and Response RTI and Early Childhood Jim Lesko, Ed.D Delaware Department of Education

37 35

38 36 Principals for Developing the Response in Early Childhood Merges the best aspects of early childhood general and special education Combines the standard treatment protocol and problem-solving process from RTI Includes content based on the best predictors of language and literacy skills in pre-k Includes curricula and instructional approaches for pre-k that are validated through research/practice Uses methods for scaffolding learning that are based on evidence Includes a balance of explicit and embedded approaches Includes guidelines for implementation

39 37 Culturally and linguistically diverse population Teachers on a continuum of learning

40 38

41 39 Institute for Education Sciences Math and Literacy

42 40 Effectiveness Ratings for Early Childhood Interventions

43 41 http://www.doe.k12.de.us/programs/earlychildhood/preschoo l.shtml

44 42

45 43 References and Sites References Buysee, V., & Winton, P., & Zimmerman, T. (2007). RTI goes to pre-k: An early intervening system called recognition and response. Early Developments, 11, 6-10. Coleman, M.R., Buysee, V., & Neitzel, J. (2006). Recognition and response: An early intervening system for young children at-risk for learning disabilities. Full report. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, FPG Child Development Institute Coleman, M. R., Buysse, V., & Neitzel, J. (2006). Establishing the evidence base for an emerging early childhood practice: Recognition and response. In V. Buysse, & P. Wesley. (Eds.), Evidence-based practice in the early childhood field (pp. 227-246). Washington, DC: Zero to Three. Listing of some important web sites: http://www.recognitionandresponse.org http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~randr/ http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/ http://ies.ed.gov/

46 44 Mathematics Diana Roscoe Delaware Department of Education And Jamila Riser, Math Coalition Val Maxwell and Jan Parsons, University of Delaware Eric Shane, Caesar Rodney School District

47 45 Math Interventions An intervention can be thought of as a plan of action on behalf of students who are struggling or who are being considered for acceleration. The term intervention usually indicates that the students difficulties or particular strengths are in the early stages, when they can be identified and possibly addressed before they become a concern. In contrast, remediation is often applied to actions taken to reverse established patterns of achievement by students who are already struggling or failing and need intensive and long-term assistance. (NCTM) Both are a part of Response to Intervention

48 46 Resources How do we as a teacher, school, district, state, develop math intervention strategies when even the experts havent developed a multitude of effective prescriptive intervention strategies?

49 47

50 48 Effective Intervention Is a Problem- Solving Process We invite you to participate in the following two problem-solving strategies that help teachers to build a library of interventions Whole class – pedagogical intervention Individualized – item/content specific intervention

51 Intervention Research is a Process of Inquiry

52 50 Identify a Problem Formulate a Question Develop Strategies Based on Your Question Develop a Plan for Data Collection Gather and Analyze the Data Reflect on the Results Plan for the Next Action Next Steps

53 My students perform well during classroom instruction but seem to fall apart on exams such as the DSTP or NAEP. They behave as if they have never seen a problem with this mathematical content and many of them even leave answers blank. Small Group Activity- Use the Intervention Research Process of Inquiry to: 1. Formulate a question 2. Develop Strategies based on the question 3. Develop a plan for data collection

54 52 Fifth Grade Sturdy paper plates come in packages of 8. How many packages of plates should the Yum Yum Deli supply so that each of the 527 people can have one plate? Assessment purpose for this item: 1. Know what to do with the remainder. 2. Compute Correctly 3. Recognize that division is needed to solve this problem.

55 53 Sorting Activity Sort the papers A through M into three piles. Need immediate intervention Okay for Now No intervention needed Record your notes regarding anything you see that may be getting in the way of successfully completing the problem ( Sorting Activity Handout ). Share your notes and carry out a group discussion regarding possible intervention strategies with one note taker in the group (Intervention Worksheet Handout ). Share one intervention with the entire room.

56 54 Identify a Problem Formulate a Question Develop Strategies Based on Your Question Develop a Plan for Data Collection Gather and Analyze the Data Reflect on the Results Plan for the Next Action Next Steps

57 55 The core purpose of professional development should be the continuous improvement of professional practice. Thomas R. Corcoran, 1998

58 56 Administrators Have a Key Role Make improving instructional practice and shared accountability for student achievement high priorities. Recognize, value, and promote research-based effective instructional strategies and differentiated interventions. Expect all faculty to engage in research-based effective instructional strategies and differentiated interventions. Create learning communities that support teachers as they work to transform/improve instructional practice and develop interventions. Provide time and guidance for collegial work.

59 57 School-Based Teacher Leaders Role Create a safe environment for others to share their professional practices Take the lead in sharing your professional practice and develop an intervention. Maintain a stance of inquiryI wonder... Listen

60 58 Teachers Have a Role Actively contribute to the creation of a safe environment for others to share their professional practices Participate in the sharing of professional practice and be willing to implement and experiment with a variety of proposed interventions Record and share feedback on your implementation of interventions Maintain a stance of inquiryI wonder... Listen

61 59 The key to long-term improvement [in teaching] is to figure out how to generate, accumulate, and share professional knowledge. The Teaching Gap

62 60

63 61 Choosing and Using Reading Interventions Sharon Walpole, Ph.D. University of Delaware

64 62 Overview Introduce the Cognitive Model of Reading Assessment Define characteristics of interventions that work Compare and contrast intervention strategies and intervention programs Provide access to public program reviews Examine a comprehensive content-analysis system for coordinating choices for your district or school

65 63 http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1465/

66 64 What is comprehension? Comprehension is understanding what is heard or read. Comprehension of any text involves creation of an integrated and coherent representation of the text. Comprehension may or may not lead to memory for text or text ideas.

67 65 RANDs heuristic for thinking about reading comprehension

68 66 Stage models of reading When children are acquiring literacy – developing the skills necessary for reading comprehension – they tend to move through stages in which their focus is very different. All along, during each stage, they are developing oral language skills. Although our goal is increased comprehension, at times we must address lower-level skills. Comprehension Oral Language Fluency Alphabetic Principle Phonemic Awareness

69 67 This text is currently being revised; the Cognitive Model is part of the revision.

70 The Cognitive Model Phonological Awareness Decoding and Sight Word Knowledge Print Concepts Fluency in Context Automatic Word Recognition Reading Comprehension Language Comprehension Strategic Knowledge General Purposes for Reading Specific Purposes for Reading Knowledge of Strategies for Reading Vocabulary Knowledge Background Knowledge Knowledge of Text and Sentence Structures

71 69 Assessment-Driven Decisions Give screening test in a given area (and in more basic areas if need be) If screening identifies a problem area, give a diagnostic test to determine skill needs Give progress monitoring tests periodically to determine impact of targeted instruction Identify programs or strategies that specifically address the skill needs

72 70 The concept of three tiers of instruction The 3-tier model (University of Texas System/Texas Education Agency, 2005) is a general framework and just a framework for explaining how any research-based program can be executed in a school. http://www.texasreading.org/utcrla/materials/3tier_letter.asp

73 71 Tier I: Core Grade-Level Reading Instruction 1. A core reading program grounded in scientifically based reading research 2. Benchmark testing of all students to determine instructional needs at least three times per year (fall, winter, and spring) 3. Ongoing professional development to provide teachers with the necessary tools to ensure every student receives quality reading instruction

74 72 Tier II: Supplemental Instruction For some students, core grade-level reading instruction is not enough. Tier II is designed to meet the needs of these students by providing them with additional small-group reading instruction daily.

75 73 Tier III: Instruction for Intensive Intervention A small percentage of students require more support in acquiring vital reading skills than Tier II instruction can provide. For these students, Tier III provides instruction that is more explicit, more intensive, and specifically designed to meet their individual needs.

76 PA and Word Recognition Word Recognition and Fluency A Stairway to Proficiency Fluency and Comprehension Vocabulary & Comprehension

77 75 Automatic Word Recognition: Programs and Strategies Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3 Phonological Awareness and Print Awareness Decoding and Sight Word Knowledge Oral Reading Fluency

78 76 Language Comprehension: Programs and Strategies Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3 Vocabulary Knowledge Background Knowledge Text structure knowledge Sentence structure knowledge

79 77 Strategic Knowledge: Programs and Strategies Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3 Reading strategies Specific purposes for reading General purposes for reading

80 78 Comprehensive Early Interventions A recent review of extensive interventions (those with at least 100 sessions) compared 12 studies. The report provides descriptions, effect sizes, and cost estimates. http://www.centeroninstruction.org/resources_searchresults.cfm?se archterms=extensive+reading+interventionsh

81 79 For temporary, targeted intervention efforts, avoid comprehensive solutions in favor of specialized ones.

82 Once I know what my focus is, how can I address it?

83 81 Effective interventions integrate three essential components: 1. Explicit, systematic content 2. Intensive instructional design 3. Reflexive instructional delivery Meyers, S. D. (2006). Evaluating the effectiveness of a kindergarten intervention program. Unpublished executive position paper, University of Delaware.

84 82 Explicit Content: Lesson Focus Phonemic Awareness Find the middle sounds in words. Word Recognition Learn a series of new letter sounds. Learn new consonant or vowel patterns. Read and spell words that you see all of the time. FluencyWork with words that you must read quickly. Read text repeatedly to increase rate.

85 83 Explicit Content: Teacher Modeling Phonemic Awareness Teachers use pictures, manipulatives, and hand signals to direct attention Word Recognition Teachers sound and blend words using standardized, repetitive procedures FluencyTeachers read to students or use choral or echo procedures to model fluent reading

86 84 Systematic Content Across lessons Words and texts are organized from easiest to hardest over a sequence of lessons Within lessons The teacher models, works with the students, and then has them work independently Across lessons There are planned repetitions of old items and opportunities to demonstrate and assess mastery

87 85 Intensive Instructional Designs GroupingSmaller groups are more intensive; interventions usually require homogeneous groups TimeTime on task, actually reading or writing or responding, is maximized; instruction is well organized OpportunityStudents respond chorally or in every pupil response format to maximize individual chances; teacher uses specific error correction procedures

88 86 Reflexive Instructional Designs Entry PointsData are used to decide where students should begin a lesson sequence Progress Monitoring There are procedures to monitor whether students are learning the specific items taught in the intervention Exit PointsThere is a definite, specific goal for mastery of the skill that is targeted in the intervention

89 Is it possible to do all this without commercial programs?

90 88 Nearly all vendors claim that their programs are scientifically based Scientifically-based programs Scientifically-based strategies The entire program, tested with random assignment and implemented with fidelity, yielded better outcomes compared with a control group The specific strategy, tested with random assignment and implemented with fidelity, yielded better outcomes compared with a control group Actually, very few programs meet these stringent tests; rather, most programs combine a series of scientifically based strategies

91 89 Scientifically-based programs BenefitsCosts The scope and sequence is already systematic There are scripts to keep instruction explicit After initial training, less planning time is needed Time and focus may be inconsistent with your needs The programs may be expensive There may be no way to allow multiple entry points

92 90 Scientifically-based strategies BenefitsCosts The instructional strategy is very specific to address one or two components of reading The skill can be measured repeatedly to test student response Strategies are published in research journals; you have to find them More planning time is needed to assemble materials You may not have adequate texts

93 91 What we have to avoid is continuing ineffective current practices. Serving our children requires that we adopt scientifically-based strategies and/or programs and that we monitor their effectiveness for each child.

94 92 Descriptions of Programs http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/WWC/reports

95 93

96 94 Descriptions of Programs The Florida Center for Reading Research produces narrative descriptions of a variety of commercial programs. The descriptions include any available research evidence. fcrr.org

97 95

98 96

99 97

100 98

101 How could you inventory the strengths and weaknesses of your current programs?

102 100 The Oregon Reading First Center used to review and rate programs; those ratings have been deleted from the website and only the rating guides are available. Procedures for Reviewing Programs

103 101 The Oregon procedure includes items for analysis for K-3 intervention programs that could be very helpful to you. http://oregonreadingfirst.uoregon.edu/inst_curr_review.html

104 102 Grouping structure Whole group Small group 1-on-1 Professional Development Total number of hours Time recommendations Minutes per day Days per week Number of sessions Materials Provided Created by teacher Interventionist Qualifications Certified teacher Paraprofessional Other Total Cost Estimate

105 103 Instructional Design and Emphasis 1. Introduces a manageable amount of information and objectives within a lesson. 2. Provides sufficient emphasis on high-priority skills and strategies 3. Provides sufficient modeled examples prior to learner practice. 4. Includes sufficient opportunities for student responses.

106 104 Instructional Design and Emphasis 5. Structures adequate practice and review for mastery of new skill/strategy 6. Provides specific guidance for corrective feedback. 7. Includes specific recommendation or guidance for reteaching.

107 105 Instructional Grouping 1. Includes a placement test or process that allows students to start at different entry points in the materials depending on student performance. 2. Provides recommendations on group size and range of performance within groups. 3. Recommends and accommodates flexible groupings to maximize student learning.

108 106 Instructional Assessment 1. Allows teachers to determine the effectiveness of instruction by conducting frequent and ongoing assessment checkpoints on critical skills. 2. Includes assessment items for each major reading skill/strategy that can be used to determine what students need to learn and how much they have learned.

109 107 Instructional Assessment 3. Provides guidance to teachers on how to use assessment information to plan and differentiate instruction. 4. Monitors student progress at the end of each unit of instruction.

110 How could you critically evaluate the efficacy of your current programs?

111 109 Automatic Word Recognition: Programs and Strategies Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3 Phonological Awareness and Print Awareness Decoding and Sight Word Knowledge Oral Reading Fluency

112 110 Language Comprehension: Programs and Strategies Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3 Vocabulary Knowledge Background Knowledge Text structure knowledge Sentence structure knowledge

113 111 Strategic Knowledge: Programs and Strategies Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3 Reading strategies Specific purposes for reading General purposes for reading

114 112 The most recent procedure for program review is available from fcrr.org. It allows you to consider all programs, K-6, at once. Procedures for Reviewing Programs

115 113 Review this content analysis procedure. What would you have to do to use this procedure to consider new programs and/or strategies?

116 If I have strategies and/or programs, how might I deliver them?

117 115 This public- access document provides reasonable suggestions for elementary school intervention design. www.centeroninstruction.org/

118 Scheduling Options Strongest Design Struggling students receive differentiated instruction from the classroom teacher PLUS additional intervention outside the reading block. Moderate Design Other adults push in to the classroom to provide intervention to struggling students while other students receive differentiated instruction. Weakest Design Classroom teacher provides instruction while other children engage in reading practice.

119 Who can provide these interventions?

120 118 Matching programs and strategies with personnel Highly scripted Highly responsive Smaller range of adults (e.g., certified specialists) Wider range of adults (e.g., paraprofessionals)

121 119 Matching programs and strategies with personnel Highly scripted Highly responsive Smaller range of adults (e.g., certified specialists) Wider range of adults (e.g., paraprofessionals)

122 120 Next Steps 1. Inventory your current resources. 2. Locate potential new resources. Center on Instruction Extensive Interventions? FCRR interventions? What Works Clearinghouse? 3. Use FCRR guide to analyze resources and understand their potential fit. 4. Consider your resources (time, personnel, and budget).

123 121 Web-Based Resources K-3fcrr.org oregonreadingfirst.uoregon.edu/ http://www.readingfirst.virginia.edu/ http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/reading/project s/garf/ K-12www.usoe.k12.ut.us/SARS/servicesinfo/pdfs/3- tierread.pdf http://www.centeroninstruction.org/ http://www.studentprogress.org

124 122 Featured School – P.S. duPont, Brandywine School District Lincoln Hohler, Principal Alise Furlong, Teacher Diana Golden, Teacher Barbara Kaufman, Teacher Linda Lobach, Teacher Agnes Paul, Teacher

125 123 School Presentation by…. P. S. duPont Elementary School

126 R.T.I. UN funded UN fair UN certain UN happy un BELIEVABLE !

127 125 The Continuum of Implementation Where Are You?

128 R.T.I. Our schools answers to: When? Who? How?

129 The Mindset Village People Relationships with colleagues with students with parents The view and value of Data

130 The Data Dilemma The More the Merrier trap Diagnosticians Common Assessments NWEA Map DSTP DIBELS Walpole Inventory SuccessMaker data Marking Period Grade Analyses S.T.A.R.

131 Student ID GenderGender R ac e PY DST P Read ing NW EA Spr ing 200 7 N W EA Fa ll 20 07 NW EA Win ter 200 8 NW EA Diff ere nce fro m Fall Distance from PL3 Winter PY DST P Mat h NW EA Spri ng 200 7 NWE A Fall 2007 NW EA Win ter 200 8 NWE A Diffe renc e from Fall Distance from PL3 Winter E n g li s h / L A English Teacher Math Math Math Teacher T ot al D ay s A bs e nt Tot al Da ys Lat e 956322M23 20 6 20 3 21 07 2 ABOVE3211210 21 77 2 ABOVEB Page- Aaron,DB Hakim, S22 924319M22 21 3 21 1 22 413 16 ABOVE3219218 21 91 4 ABOVEA Whitaker, KC Gilbert, N00 443327M22 20 5 19 6 20 71112218204 20 956C Davis,S.B Houser, S04 009725F52 21 2 21 0 21 88 10 ABOVE3207204 21 713 2 ABOVEC Davis,S.B Houser, S20 074095M23 21 5 21 3 20 7-613215227 21 6-11 1 ABOVEA Arasim, SB Gilbert, N10 448821M21 18 3 18 8 19 91191184203 22 522 10 ABOVEDCocoCWilliams13 070086M53 21 2 22 2 0 14 ABOVE 1208213 21 5 20B Page- Aaron,D B Hakim, S00 058266M39 19 5 17 3-22353 210 05 Page- Aaron,DB Hakim, S00

132 From Pointing Fingers to Holding Hands From One is the Loneliest Number to Were All in This Together What is togetherness? Support from: StateDistrict SchoolTeacher StudentFamily Community Student/Parent/Teacher Conferences Goal setting with NWEA MAP data Students tracking their own data Progress/goal attainment feedback to parents

133 131 TIME and Collaboration Mission Impossible Finding blocks of 30 minutes w/o missing core content Finding staff available during those blocks to provide 1:5 intervention Finding time to identify/discuss individual real time student need Finding time to plan and coordinate intervention with/between teachers

134 132 You know, I noticed the same thing with Johnny. The literal comprehension, pass the pickles, doesnt seem, no –the sweet pickles, to give him, no, Ill pass on the onions, got choir practice tonight – you know, Love they neighbor!, to be as much, how do you eat those hot peppers like that, do you have an asbestos stomach … Traditional Collaborative Planning Session

135 133 TIME and Collaboration 1. Power Half Hour Mandatory SSR Duty free scheduling maximizes available staff Small group intervention Model SSR while teachers collaboratively plan interventions 2.Terrific Tuesdays 90 minute whole team collaboration 2 – 45 minute intervention / enrichment periods Based on drilled down need Mission Accomplished

136 134 Drilling Down Sign Language Comprehension Math Applications Basic Math Skills Math Stats SuccessMaker Analytical Thinking Team Building Math 24 Q.A.R. Vocab in Context Vocab Development Corrective Reading A Corrective Reading B Corrective Reading C Decoding Fluency Test Taking Skills Book Club Readers Theatre Myth Busters Chess Guidance Groups Bullying* Get Energized Leadership Core Life Skills

137 135 Coordination of Support The Target Team: - IST Facilitator - Title I - Support Staff - Enrichment Teacher - Administration

138 136 Next Steps Professional Development Common Language: Benchmarking Interventions Progress Monitoring Greater prescriptive programming with SuccessMaker by teachers (frontloading, remediation, extension)


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