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READING ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Putting it all together… Comprehension, Analysis, Critical Thinking Week 4.

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Presentation on theme: "READING ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Putting it all together… Comprehension, Analysis, Critical Thinking Week 4."— Presentation transcript:

1 READING ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Putting it all together… Comprehension, Analysis, Critical Thinking Week 4

2 Click to Go to a Particular Days Agenda and Presentation Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Week 4

3 Day 1 Agenda Focus for the Week Quick Review from Previous Weeks Pamphlet Material Read Item Type Vocabulary Activity: I HAVE Pre-Reading Activity: Turkeys Reading and Answering: Turkeys Extension Task: COE Go Back to Day Choices

4 Focus for the Week Since this is our last week, you will be expected to do all of the explaining when we go over scoring. You will use all the skills you have been working on the last 3 weeks to show what you have learned. Remember, dont be afraid to ask questions. This will help you and others in class.

5 Pamphlet

6 Take care of yourself before the assessment. Getting sleep and eating breakfast will fuel your brain. Dont be afraid to ask questions if you dont understand the directions. These are important pieces that we have covered the last 4 weeks. If you use what you have learned the last 4 weeks on the Reading WASL then you did your best. Remember that you still have to earn your credits to graduate.

7 You have had multiple choice, short answer and extended response items (questions). We have gone over how to approach each type of question using vocabulary used on the assessment.

8 Text/Story/Passage/Selection/Poem On the Reading WASL text/story/passage/selection/ poem all refer to the material you will read. Material Read

9 Informational: true information (usually science or social studies topics) Literary: reads like a story (poem, story, literary biography) Passage/Text/Story/Selection/Poem

10 Interacting with the Passage/Text/Story/Selection/Poem You can write on the assessment with your No. 2 pencil. You can make notes and underline while you read. You can mark on the questions. Stay away from the bubbles on multiple choice items.

11 Different Strategies for Different Types of Items (Questions)

12 You will see 3 types of questions. All of the questions were written using the text. Dont be afraid to read and re-read and read again the questions and the text. The answer will always be supported with the text.

13 Three Types of Items (Questions) Multiple Choice Worth 1 point Half of the score comes from multiple choice questions Short Answer Worth up to 2 points Has 9 lines to write on Extended Response Worth up to 4 points Has 18 lines to write on

14 Multiple Choice Short Answer Extended Response 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. _______________________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. _______________________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ 23 Why does the tortoise begin his trek back toward the Mohave? Include two details from the poem in your answer. ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ 23 Why does the tortoise begin his trek back toward the Mohave? Include two details from the poem in your answer. ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________

15 Multiple Choice Strategies for Multiple Choice: 1.Read the question 2.Underline what is being asked and think about it 3.Read all answer choices 4.Re-read the choices and eliminate them using the text

16 Short Answer If you see a question with 9 lines, use 4 details from the text to support your answer. 23 Why does the tortoise begin his trek back toward the Mohave? Include two details from the poem in your answer. ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ 23 Why does the tortoise begin his trek back toward the Mohave? Include two details from the poem in your answer. ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________

17 Extended Response If you see a question with 18 lines, use 6 details from the text to support your answer. 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. ______________________________________ _______ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ _____________________________________ 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. ______________________________________ _______ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ _____________________________________

18 The format for each rubric is the same Item How to earn points Specific bullets that are from the text Origin of score points Rubrics

19 Vocabulary Activity

20 Comprehension, Analysis, and Critical Thinking Vocabulary Activity This game is called I Have…Who Has. You will play this game each week. The goal is to get faster each time so that you beat your previous time even as more words are added. Directions: One person will start when told to; he/she will read their card starting with Who Has. You will pair up with the person who has the answer to your Who Has as quickly as possible and stand by him/her. Then the next person will go until everyone has found his/her pair. You will end up making a group circle with the first person who went being the answer to the last Who Has. You have to use the word in a WASL example sentence. Click on the clock to open the timer.

21 Now That Our Brains are Warmed-Up… Pre-Reading We will be reading the passage Turkeys. Take a minute to look it over. Lets talk about what you see: What strategies will you use?

22 Reading and Answering As you read, you can underline anything that seems important with your No. 2 pencil. You can also write in the margins, put a star next to a phrase that seems important, or put a question mark next to something that seems interesting. Take your time; dont rush.

23 If You Are Finished... COE Extension Task Put your practice to the side. Take out a previous task and use the rubric to score it. Revise your answer to earn more points. Type your final answer.

24 Were Done with Day 1…

25 Day 2 Agenda Finish Reading and Answering: Turkeys OR Work on Extension Activity: COE Scoring: Turkeys Go Back to Day Choices

26 If you are finished... COE Extension Task Put your practice to the side. Take out a previous task and use the rubric to score it. Revise your answer to earn more points. Review your vocabulary. Type your final answer.

27 TURKEYS BY BAILEY WHITE Scoring

28 Turkeys

29 1 Write a summary of the story. Include three main events from the story in your summary.

30 2 A 2-point response accurately summarizes the story by including three main events from the story. OR Provides a summarizing statement and two main events from the story. Example: The girl is sick. The ornithologists put wild turkey eggs next to her so she will keep them warm. The eggs hatch. OR Example: In this story, a little girl helps save some wild turkeys. The ornithologists put the eggs next to the girl. Later that summer, she helped the turkeys learn to fly. 11 A 1-point response partially summarizes the story by including one or two main events from the story. OR Provides a summarizing statement and one main event from the story. OR Provides a summarizing statement.

31 Possible summarizing statements may include, but are not limited to: The ornithologists and the little girl helped raise the turkeys. In this story, a little girl helps save some wild turkeys. Text-based main events may include, but are not limited to: A. Something about my mother attracts ornithologists / It all started years ago when a couple of them discovered she had a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. The pure-strain wild turkey stock had begun to interbreed with farmers domestic stock / The species was being degraded / It was extinction by dilution. C. The ornithologists discover a rare wild turkey nest in the narrators woods. D. The ornithologists were protecting the nest from predators / (Their protective measures) cause the mother turkey to abandon her nest E. The narrator contracts the measles / Her temperature is 102 / She is sick F. The ornithologists put the eggs next to the narrator. G. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. / The eggshells crackled, and the turkey babies fluttered and cheeped and snuggled against me. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. The day came when they were ready to fly for the first time / I ran down the hill and the turkeys ran too. Then, one by one, they took off. J. One hundred percent pure wild turkey / The woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys Possible summarizing statements may include, but are not limited to: The ornithologists and the little girl helped raise the turkeys. In this story, a little girl helps save some wild turkeys. Text-based main events may include, but are not limited to: A. Something about my mother attracts ornithologists / It all started years ago when a couple of them discovered she had a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. The pure-strain wild turkey stock had begun to interbreed with farmers domestic stock / The species was being degraded / It was extinction by dilution. C. The ornithologists discover a rare wild turkey nest in the narrators woods. D. The ornithologists were protecting the nest from predators / (Their protective measures) cause the mother turkey to abandon her nest E. The narrator contracts the measles / Her temperature is 102 / She is sick F. The ornithologists put the eggs next to the narrator. G. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. / The eggshells crackled, and the turkey babies fluttered and cheeped and snuggled against me. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. The day came when they were ready to fly for the first time / I ran down the hill and the turkeys ran too. Then, one by one, they took off. J. One hundred percent pure wild turkey / The woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys

32 Possible summarizing statements may include, but are not limited to: The ornithologists and the little girl helped raise the turkeys. In this story, a little girl helps save some wild turkeys. Text-based main events may include, but are not limited to: A. Something about my mother attracts ornithologists / It all started years ago when a couple of them discovered she had a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. The pure-strain wild turkey stock had begun to interbreed with farmers domestic stock / The species was being degraded / It was extinction by dilution. C. The ornithologists discover a rare wild turkey nest in the narrators woods. D. The ornithologists were protecting the nest from predators / (Their protective measures) cause the mother turkey to abandon her nest E. The narrator contracts the measles / Her temperature is 102 / She is sick F. The ornithologists put the eggs next to the narrator. G. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. / The eggshells crackled, and the turkey babies fluttered and cheeped and snuggled against me. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. The day came when they were ready to fly for the first time / I ran down the hill and the turkeys ran too. Then, one by one, they took off. J. One hundred percent pure wild turkey / The woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys Possible summarizing statements may include, but are not limited to: The ornithologists and the little girl helped raise the turkeys. In this story, a little girl helps save some wild turkeys. Text-based main events may include, but are not limited to: A. Something about my mother attracts ornithologists / It all started years ago when a couple of them discovered she had a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. The pure-strain wild turkey stock had begun to interbreed with farmers domestic stock / The species was being degraded / It was extinction by dilution. C. The ornithologists discover a rare wild turkey nest in the narrators woods. D. The ornithologists were protecting the nest from predators / (Their protective measures) cause the mother turkey to abandon her nest E. The narrator contracts the measles / Her temperature is 102 / She is sick F. The ornithologists put the eggs next to the narrator. G. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. / The eggshells crackled, and the turkey babies fluttered and cheeped and snuggled against me. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. The day came when they were ready to fly for the first time / I ran down the hill and the turkeys ran too. Then, one by one, they took off. J. One hundred percent pure wild turkey / The woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys / /19

33 2 E, G, I 2 E, G, I

34 2 A, B, D, E, F 2 A, B, D, E, F

35 1 I 1 I

36 Who protected the wild turkeys? Wheres the text- based detail? 0 0

37 Score Your Own

38 2 What does the narrator most likely mean when she says, I was a sensible child in paragraph 15 of the story? A.She welcomed the ornithologists visits to her home. B. She allowed the baby turkeys to follow her in the yard. C.She moved slowly because her head still ached from the fever. D.She reacted calmly to the presence of the baby turkeys next to her. 2 What does the narrator most likely mean when she says, I was a sensible child in paragraph 15 of the story? A.She welcomed the ornithologists visits to her home. B. She allowed the baby turkeys to follow her in the yard. C.She moved slowly because her head still ached from the fever. D.She reacted calmly to the presence of the baby turkeys next to her.

39 Score Your Own

40 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. _______________________________________________________________________ 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. _______________________________________________________________________

41 4 A 4-point response states an appropriate problem the ornithologists experience in the story and includes three text-based events that contribute to the resolution of the problem. Example: The problem is that the mother turkey abandons her nest. The ornithologists call the mother to see if her child still has a fever. They place turkey eggs by narrators body to keep warm. The next morning the eggs hatched and there were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. 3A 3-point response states an appropriate problem the ornithologists face in the story and provides two text-based events that contribute to the resolution of the problem. 2A 2-point response states an appropriate problem the ornithologists face in the story and provides one text-based events that contribute to the resolution of the problem. OR Provides two text-based events that would resolve an appropriate problem. 1A 1-point response states an appropriate problem the ornithologists face in the story. OR Provides one text-based event that would resolve an appropriate problem.

42 Reasonable problems may include, but are not limited to: Mother turkey abandons nest. They need to find a way to hatch the eggs and keep the offspring alive. The wild turkey stock was being diluted or becoming extinct. Text-based events may include, but are not limited to: A. It all started years ago when a couple of ornithologists discovered a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. One ornithologist devised a formula to compute the ratio of domestic to pure-strain wild turkey in an individual bird by comparing the angle of flight at takeoff and the rate of acceleration. C. They discovered a wild turkey nest. D. Does your little girl still have measles?/ She was very sick / temperature of 102 / feel narrators body to determine temperature E. Cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still. / The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, came up with the next best thing. (the girls body) F. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. G. The ornithologists were protecting her from predators. / The turkey hen abandoned her nest. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together. / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. Baby turkeys fly when narrator runs downhill J. Ornithologists measure angle of flight and speed. / One hundred percent pure wild turkey! K. And the woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys. / I like to think they are all descendants of those sixteen birds I saved. Reasonable problems may include, but are not limited to: Mother turkey abandons nest. They need to find a way to hatch the eggs and keep the offspring alive. The wild turkey stock was being diluted or becoming extinct. Text-based events may include, but are not limited to: A. It all started years ago when a couple of ornithologists discovered a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. One ornithologist devised a formula to compute the ratio of domestic to pure-strain wild turkey in an individual bird by comparing the angle of flight at takeoff and the rate of acceleration. C. They discovered a wild turkey nest. D. Does your little girl still have measles?/ She was very sick / temperature of 102 / feel narrators body to determine temperature E. Cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still. / The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, came up with the next best thing. (the girls body) F. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. G. The ornithologists were protecting her from predators. / The turkey hen abandoned her nest. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together. / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. Baby turkeys fly when narrator runs downhill J. Ornithologists measure angle of flight and speed. / One hundred percent pure wild turkey! K. And the woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys. / I like to think they are all descendants of those sixteen birds I saved.

43 Reasonable problems may include, but are not limited to: Mother turkey abandons nest. They need to find a way to hatch the eggs and keep the offspring alive. The wild turkey stock was being diluted or becoming extinct. Text-based events may include, but are not limited to: A. It all started years ago when a couple of ornithologists discovered a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. One ornithologist devised a formula to compute the ratio of domestic to pure-strain wild turkey in an individual bird by comparing the angle of flight at takeoff and the rate of acceleration. C. They discovered a wild turkey nest. D. Does your little girl still have measles?/ She was very sick / temperature of 102 / feel narrators body to determine temperature E. Cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still. / The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, came up with the next best thing. (the girls body) F. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. G. The ornithologists were protecting her from predators. / The turkey hen abandoned her nest. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together. / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. Baby turkeys fly when narrator runs downhill J. Ornithologists measure angle of flight and speed. / One hundred percent pure wild turkey! K. And the woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys. / I like to think they are all descendants of those sixteen birds I saved. Reasonable problems may include, but are not limited to: Mother turkey abandons nest. They need to find a way to hatch the eggs and keep the offspring alive. The wild turkey stock was being diluted or becoming extinct. Text-based events may include, but are not limited to: A. It all started years ago when a couple of ornithologists discovered a rare species of woodpecker coming to her bird feeder. B. One ornithologist devised a formula to compute the ratio of domestic to pure-strain wild turkey in an individual bird by comparing the angle of flight at takeoff and the rate of acceleration. C. They discovered a wild turkey nest. D. Does your little girl still have measles?/ She was very sick / temperature of 102 / feel narrators body to determine temperature E. Cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still. / The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, came up with the next best thing. (the girls body) F. The eggs hatch. / There were sixteen fuzzy baby turkeys in bed with her. G. The ornithologists were protecting her from predators. / The turkey hen abandoned her nest. H. The baby turkeys and narrator gained strength together. / The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me and tripping over their own spraddle-toed feet / The turkeys tumbled after me down the steps and scratched around in the yard. (followed her) I. Baby turkeys fly when narrator runs downhill J. Ornithologists measure angle of flight and speed. / One hundred percent pure wild turkey! K. And the woods where I live are full of pure wild turkeys. / I like to think they are all descendants of those sixteen birds I saved /7 12/

44 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. 4 Problem & D, D, D, E, F, F 4 Problem & D, D, D, E, F, F

45 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. 3 C, E, F, I 3 C, E, F, I

46 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. 2 D, F 2 D, F

47 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. 1 point for many Problems 1 point for many Problems

48 3 What problem do the ornithologists experience in the story? What are three events that contribute to the resolution of the problem? Include information from the story in your answer. 0 0

49 Score Your Own

50 4 Which word could the author have used in paragraph 2 instead of the word demise? A.End B. Growth C.Surplus D.Preservation 4 Which word could the author have used in paragraph 2 instead of the word demise? A.End B. Growth C.Surplus D.Preservation Write guess here.

51 Score Your Own

52 5 Which opinion can be supported with information from the story? A.All change is for the better. B. No good can come from being sick. C.Ensuring the survival of native birds is important. D.Woodpeckers are more interesting than wild turkeys. 5 Which opinion can be supported with information from the story? A.All change is for the better. B. No good can come from being sick. C.Ensuring the survival of native birds is important. D.Woodpeckers are more interesting than wild turkeys.

53 Score Your Own

54 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. ______________________________________________________________ 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. ______________________________________________________________

55 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. _______________________________________________________________ 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. _______________________________________________________________ Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: A. A hundred two – cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still (The ornithologists placed the turkey eggs next to the feverish girl)/The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, used their heads and came up with the next best thing. / The eggs hatched, and the baby turkeys snuggled against the girl. B. The next morning I was better. / For the first time in days I could think. / The baby turkey and I gained our strength together. C. The turkey hen had been so disturbed by the elaborate protective measures that had been undertaken in her behalf that she abandoned her nest. D. The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me. / When I went outside for the fist time, the turkeys tumbled after me down the steps. E. I ran down the hill and the turkey ran too / One by one, they took off. / They flew high and fast. F. They jumped up and down and hugged each other. / One hundred percent wild turkey! I like to think theyre descendants of those sixteen birds I saved from the vigilance of the ornithologists. Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: A. A hundred two – cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still (The ornithologists placed the turkey eggs next to the feverish girl)/The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, used their heads and came up with the next best thing. / The eggs hatched, and the baby turkeys snuggled against the girl. B. The next morning I was better. / For the first time in days I could think. / The baby turkey and I gained our strength together. C. The turkey hen had been so disturbed by the elaborate protective measures that had been undertaken in her behalf that she abandoned her nest. D. The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me. / When I went outside for the fist time, the turkeys tumbled after me down the steps. E. I ran down the hill and the turkey ran too / One by one, they took off. / They flew high and fast. F. They jumped up and down and hugged each other. / One hundred percent wild turkey! I like to think theyre descendants of those sixteen birds I saved from the vigilance of the ornithologists. 2A 2-point response provides two text-based details from the story that support the conclusion. Example: The ornithologists good intentions did lead to unexpected results. For one thing, they disturbed the mother turkey and she abandoned her nest. Then they placed the eggs next to the girl who had a fever and the eggs hatched. 1A 1-point response provides one text-based detail from the story that supports the Conclusion.

56 Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: A. A hundred two – cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still (The ornithologists placed the turkey eggs next to the feverish girl) / The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, used their heads and came up with the next best thing./ The eggs hatched, and the baby turkeys snuggled against the girl. B. The next morning I was better. / For the first time in days I could think. / The baby turkeys and I gained our strength together. C. The turkey hen had been so disturbed by the elaborate protective measures that had been undertaken on her behalf that she abandoned her nest. D. The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me./ When I went outside for the fist time, the turkeys tumbled after me down the steps. E. I ran down the hill and the turkey ran too / One by one, they took off. / They flew high and fast. F. They jumped up and down and hugged each other. / One hundred percent wild turkey! I like to think theyre descendants of those sixteen birds I saved from the vigilance of the ornithologists. Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: A. A hundred two – cant miss if we tuck them up close and she lies still (The ornithologists placed the turkey eggs next to the feverish girl) / The ornithologists, not having an incubator on hand, used their heads and came up with the next best thing./ The eggs hatched, and the baby turkeys snuggled against the girl. B. The next morning I was better. / For the first time in days I could think. / The baby turkeys and I gained our strength together. C. The turkey hen had been so disturbed by the elaborate protective measures that had been undertaken on her behalf that she abandoned her nest. D. The turkeys peeped and cheeped around my ankles, scrambling to keep up with me./ When I went outside for the fist time, the turkeys tumbled after me down the steps. E. I ran down the hill and the turkey ran too / One by one, they took off. / They flew high and fast. F. They jumped up and down and hugged each other. / One hundred percent wild turkey! I like to think theyre descendants of those sixteen birds I saved from the vigilance of the ornithologists. 2A 2-point response provides two text-based details from the story that support the conclusion. Example: The ornithologists good intentions did lead to unexpected results. For one thing, they disturbed the mother turkey and she abandoned her nest. Then they placed the eggs next to the girl who had a fever and the eggs hatched. 1A 1-point response provides one text-based detail from the story that supports the conclusion. 12/14/16 14/ /19

57 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. 2 C, A 2 C, A

58 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. 2 B, A 2 B, A

59 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. 1C1C 1C1C

60 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. 1A1A 1A1A

61 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. 1 B 1 B

62 6 One conclusion a reader can draw from the story is that the ornithologists good intentions lead to unexpected results. Provide two details from the story that support this conclusion. 0 0

63 Score Your Own

64 7 Which sentence best states the main idea of the story? A.The mother helps raise the wild turkeys. B. The community helps protect the wild turkeys. C.The narrator unknowingly saves the wild turkeys. D.The ornithologist diligently studies the wild turkey. 7 Which sentence best states the main idea of the story? A.The mother helps raise the wild turkeys. B. The community helps protect the wild turkeys. C.The narrator unknowingly saves the wild turkeys. D.The ornithologist diligently studies the wild turkey.

65 Score Your Own

66 8 Which sentence best describes why the ornithologists want to protect the wild turkeys? A.Wild turkeys are interbreeding with domestic animals. B. Wild turkey eggs have special incubation needs. C.Wild turkey habitats are declining. D.Wild turkeys abandon their nests. 8 Which sentence best describes why the ornithologists want to protect the wild turkeys? A.Wild turkeys are interbreeding with domestic animals. B. Wild turkey eggs have special incubation needs. C.Wild turkey habitats are declining. D.Wild turkeys abandon their nests.

67 Score Your Own

68 Were Done with Day 2…

69 Day 3 Agenda Vocabulary Activity: I HAVE Pre-Reading Activity: Baseball Smarts / In the Beginning Reading and Answering: Baseball Smarts / In the Beginning Extension Task: COE Go Back to Day Choices

70 Comprehension, Analysis, Critical Thinking Vocabulary Activity I Have…Who Has. The goal is to get faster each time so that you beat your previous time even as more words are added. Directions: One person will start when told to; he/she will read their card starting with Who Has. You will pair up with the person who has the answer to your Who Has as quickly as possible and stand by him/her. Then the next person will go until everyone has found his/her pair. You will end up making a group circle with the first person who went being the answer to the last Who Has. You have to use the word in a WASL example sentence. Click on the clock to open the timer.

71 Now That Our Brains are Warmed-Up… Pre-Reading We will be reading the passage Baseball Smarts / In the Beginning. Take a minute to look it over. Lets talk about what you see: What strategies will you use?

72 Reading and Answering As you read, you can underline anything that seems important with your No. 2 pencil. You can also write in the margins, put a star next to a phrase that seems important, or put a question mark next to something that seems interesting. Take your time, dont rush.

73 If You Are Finished... COE Extension Task Put your practice to the side. Take out a previous task and use the rubric to score it. Revise your answer to earn more points. Type your final answer.

74 Were Done with Day 3…

75 Day 4 Agenda Finish reading and answering: Baseball Smarts / In the Beginning OR Work on Extension Activity: COE Scoring: Baseball Smarts / In the Beginning Go Back to Day Choices

76 If you are finished... COE Extension Task Put your practice to the side. Take out a previous task and use the rubric to score it. Revise your answer to earn more points. Type your final answer.

77 Paired (Two) Passages Every Reading WASL has a set of paired passages. These are two selections that have a similar topic. You will read the 1 st passage and answer questions about it only. You will read the 2 nd passage and answer questions about it only. After the 2 nd passages questions, there will be several questions that ask you to use details from both passages. Just remember to use the skills we have been working on and you will be fine.

78 BASEBALL SMARTS/ IN THE BEGINNING Scoring

79 9 What is the most important idea the author presents in the selection In the Beginning? A.Interest in baseball increased during the 1800s. B. Factories began producing baseballs in the 1860s. C.In the late 1800s, U.S. soldiers played baseball with Apache Indians. D. In the 1840s and 1850s, many immigrants played baseball in New York. 9 What is the most important idea the author presents in the selection In the Beginning? A.Interest in baseball increased during the 1800s. B. Factories began producing baseballs in the 1860s. C.In the late 1800s, U.S. soldiers played baseball with Apache Indians. D. In the 1840s and 1850s, many immigrants played baseball in New York.

80 Score Your Own

81 10 Based on the information in the selection In the Beginning, what conclusion can the reader draw about the impact of baseball in America? A.Baseball inspired young men to join the military. B. Baseball was a model for other amateur sports. C.Baseball was unappealing to immigrants. D. Baseball acted as a unifying force. 10 Based on the information in the selection In the Beginning, what conclusion can the reader draw about the impact of baseball in America? A.Baseball inspired young men to join the military. B. Baseball was a model for other amateur sports. C.Baseball was unappealing to immigrants. D. Baseball acted as a unifying force.

82 Score Your Own

83 12 Why did some players become convinced it was acceptable to use gloves? A.Fans urged their favorite players to use gloves. B. Players thought gloves made them appear tough. C.Albert Spalding used a glove and he was well-respected. D. Charlie Waitt designed a glove that was small and heavily padded. 12 Why did some players become convinced it was acceptable to use gloves? A.Fans urged their favorite players to use gloves. B. Players thought gloves made them appear tough. C.Albert Spalding used a glove and he was well-respected. D. Charlie Waitt designed a glove that was small and heavily padded.

84 Score Your Own

85 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. _____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. _____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

86 Text-based differences may include, but are not limited to: A. Waitt played for St. Louis Brown Stockings / Spalding played for Boston Red Stockings B. Waitt was a rookie outfielder / Spalding was a star pitcher C. Waitt takes an ordinary leather glove and cuts off the fingers / Waitt created the baseball glove / Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove / Spalding made improvements to the glove D. Fans dont like Waitts idea / they think wearing a glove is a sign of weakness / Waitt ashamed to wear it / Waitt didnt care to attract attention / Spalding was highly respected, and his use of the glove convinced others that it was all right to wear one / other players began to wear gloves E. Waitt played in 113 professional games / Waitt never spent more than one season with any team / Waitt was a journeyman ballplayer / Spalding went on to found Spalding Sporting Goods Company 2A 2-point response includes text-based information to identify two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding. Example: Charlie Waitt played for the St. Louis Stockings and Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove. 1A 1-point response includes text-based information to identify one difference between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding.

87 2A 2-point response includes text-based information to identify two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding. Example: Charlie Waitt played for the St. Louis Stockings and Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove. 1A 1-point response includes text-based information to identify one difference between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding. Text-based differences may include, but are not limited to: A. Waitt played for St. Louis Brown Stockings / Spalding played for Boston Red Stockings B. Waitt was a rookie outfielder / Spalding was a star pitcher C. Waitt takes an ordinary leather glove and cuts off the fingers / Waitt created the baseball glove / Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove/Spalding made improvements to the glove D. Fans dont like Waitts idea / they think wearing a glove is a sign of weakness / Waitt ashamed to wear it / Waitt didnt care to attract attention / Spalding was highly respected, and his use of the glove convinced others that it was all right to wear one/ other players began to wear gloves E. Waitt played in 113 professional games / Waitt never spent more than one season with any team / Waitt was a journeyman ballplayer / Spalding went on to found Spalding Sporting Goods Company 2/ /12 9/11/13 17/16

88 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. 2 B,B,A 2 B,B,A

89 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. 2 C,C,C,E,E 2 C,C,C,E,E

90 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. 2 C, D, C,D 2 C, D, C,D

91 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. 1 C,C,C 1 C,C,C

92 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. 1 E,E,E 1 E,E,E

93 13 What are two differences between Charlie Waitt and Albert Spalding? Include information from the selection Baseball Smarts in your answer. 0 0

94 Score Your Own

95 14 What are the authors purposes for writing both selections? A.To explain the development of professional baseball teams B. To explain the popularity of baseball in the United States C.To explain the development of baseball in the 1800s D. To explain advances in the baseball glove 14 What are the authors purposes for writing both selections? A.To explain the development of professional baseball teams B. To explain the popularity of baseball in the United States C.To explain the development of baseball in the 1800s D. To explain advances in the baseball glove

96 Score Your Own

97 15 What is the main similarity between Doc Adams and Albert Spalding? A.Both made baseball equipment. B. Both used broomsticks for bats. C.Both men started baseball leagues. D. Both men were paid to play baseball. 15 What is the main similarity between Doc Adams and Albert Spalding? A.Both made baseball equipment. B. Both used broomsticks for bats. C.Both men started baseball leagues. D. Both men were paid to play baseball.

98 Score Your Own

99 16 Both selections explain how baseball changed over time. Provide one detail from In the Beginning and one detail from Baseball Smarts that support this idea.

100 Make sure you have a copy of the rubric in front of you. 16 Both selections explain how baseball changed over time. Provide one detail from In the Beginning and one detail from Baseball Smarts that support this idea. 2A 2-point response provides one text-based detail from In the Beginning to explain the way baseball changed over time AND one text-based detail from Baseball smarts to explain the way baseball changed over time. Example: Baseball changed over time In the Beginning tells us that bats changed to carved and sanded pieces of ash and hickory, and Baseball Smarts says that Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove. 1A 1-point response provides one text-based detail from In the Beginning to explain the way baseball changed over time. OR Provides one text-based detail from Baseball Smarts to explain the way baseball changed over time.

101 Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: In the Beginning: A. Swinging a stick and / or tree limbs / broomsticks made great bats, as did large pieces of wood called wagon tongues / carved and sanded pieces of ash or hickory B. Walnuts wrapped in rags / rags, pieces of old mattress fabric or horsehide / baseballs couldnt be thrown very far / stuffed with rubber cuttings C. Balls made by hand / sewn by a ballplayers mother / Adams made the balls himself not only for our club but for other clubs when they were organized / workers in the leather trade were also producing and selling balls / mass produced in factories D. Soldiers enjoyed a game at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War / Geronimo fielded a team of Apaches against the U.S. Army / thousands of young men discovered baseball / teams evolved out of different professions / Knickerbockers and fifteen other clubs that played / National Association of Base Ball Players was created / Sixty-two teams in various states / Baseball cards were created and circulated among fans / Baseball continues to grow in popularity in other parts of the world E. Money would be its ruination / players should never be paid / by 1869 players were paid / Admission was charged Baseball Smarts: AA. Played bare-handed / hold hands in shape of a box to keep the ball from hitting their palms / hands ached for days / get cuts, bruises, and even broken bones / banged-up fingers / hopes that the leather will reduce the sting / had it on to save his hand / far fewer injuries and errors as a result BB. Waitt takes an ordinary leather glove and cuts off the fingers / Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove / catchers needed more protection / Harry Decker designed a heavily padded mitt in 1890 / wasnt nearly as big as todays catcher mitts, but it was a big improvement over the thin gloves worn by the rest of the fielders CC. Players and fans dont like Waitts idea / wearing a glove is a sign of weakness / ashamed to wear it / didnt care to attract attention / other players began to wear gloves / Spalding was highly respected, and his use of the glove convinced others that it was all right to wear gloves / some players even began to wear gloves on both hands / by 1896, every big-league player was using a glove Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: In the Beginning: A. Swinging a stick and / or tree limbs / broomsticks made great bats, as did large pieces of wood called wagon tongues / carved and sanded pieces of ash or hickory B. Walnuts wrapped in rags / rags, pieces of old mattress fabric or horsehide / baseballs couldnt be thrown very far / stuffed with rubber cuttings C. Balls made by hand / sewn by a ballplayers mother / Adams made the balls himself not only for our club but for other clubs when they were organized / workers in the leather trade were also producing and selling balls / mass produced in factories D. Soldiers enjoyed a game at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War / Geronimo fielded a team of Apaches against the U.S. Army / thousands of young men discovered baseball / teams evolved out of different professions / Knickerbockers and fifteen other clubs that played / National Association of Base Ball Players was created / Sixty-two teams in various states / Baseball cards were created and circulated among fans / Baseball continues to grow in popularity in other parts of the world E. Money would be its ruination / players should never be paid / by 1869 players were paid / Admission was charged Baseball Smarts: AA. Played bare-handed / hold hands in shape of a box to keep the ball from hitting their palms / hands ached for days / get cuts, bruises, and even broken bones / banged-up fingers / hopes that the leather will reduce the sting / had it on to save his hand / far fewer injuries and errors as a result BB. Waitt takes an ordinary leather glove and cuts off the fingers / Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove / catchers needed more protection / Harry Decker designed a heavily padded mitt in 1890 / wasnt nearly as big as todays catcher mitts, but it was a big improvement over the thin gloves worn by the rest of the fielders CC. Players and fans dont like Waitts idea / wearing a glove is a sign of weakness / ashamed to wear it / didnt care to attract attention / other players began to wear gloves / Spalding was highly respected, and his use of the glove convinced others that it was all right to wear gloves / some players even began to wear gloves on both hands / by 1896, every big-league player was using a glove

102 Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: In the Beginning: A. Swinging a stick and / or tree limbs / broomsticks made great bats, as did large pieces of wood called wagon tongues / carved and sanded pieces of ash or hickory B. Walnuts wrapped in rags / rags, pieces of old mattress fabric or horsehide / baseballs couldnt be thrown very far / stuffed with rubber cuttings C. Balls made by hand / sewn by a ballplayers mother / Adams made the balls himself not only for our club but for other clubs when they were organized / workers in the leather trade were also producing and selling balls / mass produced in factories D. Soldiers enjoyed a game at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War / Geronimo fielded a team of Apaches against the U.S. Army / thousands of young men discovered baseball / teams evolved out of different professions / Knickerbockers and fifteen other clubs that played / National Association of Base Ball Players was created / Sixty-two teams in various states / Baseball cards were created and circulated among fans / Baseball continues to grow in popularity in other parts of the world E. Money would be its ruination / players should never be paid / by 1869 players were paid / Admission was charged Baseball Smarts: AA. Played bare-handed / hold hands in shape of a box to keep the ball from hitting their palms / hands ached for days / get cuts, bruises, and even broken bones / banged-up fingers / hopes that the leather will reduce the sting / had it on to save his hand / far fewer injuries and errors as a result BB. Waitt takes an ordinary leather glove and cuts off the fingers / Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove / catchers needed more protection / Harry Decker designed a heavily padded mitt in 1890 / wasnt nearly as big as todays catcher mitts, but it was a big improvement over the thin gloves worn by the rest of the fielders CC. Players and fans dont like Waitts idea / wearing a glove is a sign of weakness / ashamed to wear it / didnt care to attract attention / other players began to wear gloves / Spalding was highly respected, and his use of the glove convinced others that it was all right to wear gloves / some players even began to wear gloves on both hands / by 1896, every big-league player was using a glove Text-based details may include, but are not limited to: In the Beginning: A. Swinging a stick and / or tree limbs / broomsticks made great bats, as did large pieces of wood called wagon tongues / carved and sanded pieces of ash or hickory B. Walnuts wrapped in rags / rags, pieces of old mattress fabric or horsehide / baseballs couldnt be thrown very far / stuffed with rubber cuttings C. Balls made by hand / sewn by a ballplayers mother / Adams made the balls himself not only for our club but for other clubs when they were organized / workers in the leather trade were also producing and selling balls / mass produced in factories D. Soldiers enjoyed a game at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War / Geronimo fielded a team of Apaches against the U.S. Army / thousands of young men discovered baseball / teams evolved out of different professions / Knickerbockers and fifteen other clubs that played / National Association of Base Ball Players was created / Sixty-two teams in various states / Baseball cards were created and circulated among fans / Baseball continues to grow in popularity in other parts of the world E. Money would be its ruination / players should never be paid / by 1869 players were paid / Admission was charged Baseball Smarts: AA. Played bare-handed / hold hands in shape of a box to keep the ball from hitting their palms / hands ached for days / get cuts, bruises, and even broken bones / banged-up fingers / hopes that the leather will reduce the sting / had it on to save his hand / far fewer injuries and errors as a result BB. Waitt takes an ordinary leather glove and cuts off the fingers / Spalding added a thin layer of padding inside the glove / catchers needed more protection / Harry Decker designed a heavily padded mitt in 1890 / wasnt nearly as big as todays catcher mitts, but it was a big improvement over the thin gloves worn by the rest of the fielders CC. Players and fans dont like Waitts idea / wearing a glove is a sign of weakness / ashamed to wear it / didnt care to attract attention / other players began to wear gloves / Spalding was highly respected, and his use of the glove convinced others that it was all right to wear gloves / some players even began to wear gloves on both hands / by 1896, every big-league player was using a glove Bats First baseball Making baseballs Different groups playing Money to play Pain Making glove Wearing glove 1 detail from this list

103 16 Both selections explain how baseball changed over time. Provide one detail from In the Beginning and one detail from Baseball Smarts that support this idea. 2 A, BB 2 A, BB

104 16 Both selections explain how baseball changed over time. Provide one detail from In the Beginning and one detail from Baseball Smarts that support this idea. 1A1A 1A1A

105 16 Both selections explain how baseball changed over time. Provide one detail from In the Beginning and one detail from Baseball Smarts that support this idea.

106 16 Both selections explain how baseball changed over time. Provide one detail from In the Beginning and one detail from Baseball Smarts that support this idea.

107 Score Your Own

108 17 Based on both selections, what inference can the reader make about Doc Adams and Charlie Waitt? A. They were concerned about injuries baseball players suffered. B. They were inventive people who found creative solutions to problems. C. They were focused on making the game of baseball available to more people. D. They were competitive people who wanted to change the rules of baseball.

109 Score Your Own

110 Were Done with Day 4…

111 Day 5 Agenda WASL Wrap-Up COE Tasks Wrap-Up Go Back to Day Choices

112 WASL Wrap-Up Do you have any questions? Do you have anything you want clarified? What has been the most helpful? What has been the least helpful? What advice would you give to another student who is about to start the 4 Week plan?

113 COE Wrap-Up Tasks are always worth up to 4 points. Read the question carefully and make sure that you answer all parts. Use text-based details, just like in WASL practice, to back-up your answer. You need to score a 3 or 4 to meet standard on COE.

114 Last Chance to Evaluate and Revise Your Tasks Take out a previous task and use the rubric to score it. Revise your answer to earn more points. Type your final answer.

115 Literary Comprehension Reading Strands and Target Evidence of Skill 4321 LC01 Theme Discusses a theme and uses supporting details from throughout the text to demonstrate an overall understanding Describes a theme and uses supporting details from the text Identifies a theme and includes a detail about the text States a theme or a detail about the subject LC02 Summary Summarizes by providing overarching statement that connects to events from the beginning, middle, and end of the text Summarizes by including information from the beginning, middle, and end of the text Retells by including details or events from the text States events and/or details OR makes generalizing statement about subject LC03 Inference / Prediction Infers and/or predicts about the subject to explain connections and demonstrate understanding of the text Infers and/or predicts about the subject using details to support the inference Identifies an inference and/or prediction about the text States information to suggest an inference or prediction about the subject LC04 Literary Vocabulary Discusses critical vocabulary by explaining its meaning and how it contributes to the overall context of the text Uses critical vocabulary to demonstrate understanding of the text Defines critical vocabulary from the textStates critical vocabulary from the text Literary Analysis LA05 Literary Elements Analyzes literary elements to demonstrate understanding of the text Explains literary elements to support understanding of the text Uses a detail(s) from the text to define a literary element Identifies literary element or literary information about a text LA06 Compare / Contrast Analyzes similarities and/or differences using examples to demonstrate understanding of relationships in the text Explains similarities and/or differences to show understanding of ideas in a text Determines similarities and/or differences in the text States a similarity and/or difference about a subject LA07 Cause / Effect Analyzes text to interpret the relationship between cause(s) and effect(s) and make connections to demonstrate understanding of the text Explains cause and effect relationship to demonstrate understanding of the text Determines cause and effect relationship in the text States cause(s) OR effect(s) about the subject Literary Evaluation LT08 Authors Purpose Critique authors purpose and/or intended audience in order to judge the effectiveness of the text Explains authors purpose and/or intended audience to demonstrate understanding of the text Identifies authors purpose and/or intended audience in the text States a purpose and/or audience LT09 Evaluates Reasoning Critiques reasoning and ideas/themes in the text and makes connections to demonstrate understanding Evaluate and explains reasoning and ideas/themes in the text Identifies an opinion OR personal feeling OR belief OR general statement about the subject and provides reasoning from the text States an opinion OR a personal feeling OR belief OR general statement about the subject LT10 Extends Beyond the Text Extends information beyond the text by explaining generalizations OR drawing conclusions OR applying informationand connects to larger concepts/ideas Extends information beyond the text by explaining generalizations OR drawing conclusions OR applying information to demonstrate understanding of the text Makes a general extending statement about the subject by using information from the text Makes a general extending statement about the subject Literary Rubric

116 Informational Comprehension Reading Evidence of Skill 4321 IC11 Main Idea Discusses a main idea and uses supporting details from throughout the text to demonstrate an overall understanding Describes a main idea and uses supporting details from the text Identifies an idea and includes a detail about the text States an idea or a detail about the subject IC12 Summary Summarizes by providing an overarching statement that connects details, facts and information from throughout the text Summarizes by including information from throughout the text Retells by including details, facts, or information from the text States a detail, a fact, or information about the subject IC13 Inference / Prediction Infers and/or predicts about the subject to explain connections and demonstrate understanding of the text Infers and/or predicts about a subject using details to support the inference Identifies an inference and/or a prediction about the text States information to suggest an inference or prediction about the subject IC14 Informational Vocabulary Discusses critical vocabulary by explaining its meaning and how it contributes to the overall context of the text Uses critical vocabulary to demonstrate understanding of the text Defines critical vocabulary from the text States critical vocabulary from the text Informational Analysis IA15 Text Features Analyzes text features to demonstrate understanding of the text Explains text features to support understanding of the text Links text features to meaning of textIdentifies text features in the text IA16 Compare / Contrast Analyzes similarities and/or differences using examples to demonstrate understanding of relationships in the text Explains similarities and/or differences to show understanding of ideas in a text Determines similarities and/or differences in the text States a similarity and/or difference about the subject Informational Evaluation IA17 Cause / Effect Analyzes text to interpret the relationship between cause(s) and effect(s) and make connections to demonstrate understanding of the text Explains cause and effect relationship to demonstrate understanding of the text Determines cause and effect relationship in the text States cause(s) OR effect(s) about the subject IT18 Authors / Texts Purpose Critiques authors purpose and/or intended audience in order to judge the effectiveness of the text Explains authors purpose and/or intended audience to demonstrate understanding of the text Identifies authors purpose and/or intended audience in the text States a purpose and/or audience IT19 Evaluation Critiques reasoning and ideas/themes in the text and makes connections to demonstrate understanding Evaluates and explains reasoning and ideas/themes in the text Identifies an opinion OR personal feeling, OR belief OR general statement about the subject and provides reasoning from the text States an opinion OR personal feeling, OR belief OR general statement about the subject IT20 Extends Beyond the Text Extends information beyond the text by explaining generalizations OR drawing conclusions OR applying informationand connects to larger concepts/ideas Extends information beyond the text by explaining generalizations OR drawing conclusions OR applying information to demonstrate understanding of the text Makes a general extending statement about the subject by using information from the text Makes a general extending statement about the subject Informational Rubric

117 Were Done with Day 5… Good luck! The skills and strategies we have practiced should help you be successful showing your reading skills.


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