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Reconnaissance of Coal-Slurry Deposits in Indiana Indiana Geological Survey Bloomington, Indiana August 1, 2006 - April 30, 2007 Denver Harper Chris Dintaman.

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Presentation on theme: "Reconnaissance of Coal-Slurry Deposits in Indiana Indiana Geological Survey Bloomington, Indiana August 1, 2006 - April 30, 2007 Denver Harper Chris Dintaman."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reconnaissance of Coal-Slurry Deposits in Indiana Indiana Geological Survey Bloomington, Indiana August 1, 2006 - April 30, 2007 Denver Harper Chris Dintaman Maria Mastalerz Sally Letsinger Sponsor: Center for Coal Technology Research Purdue University

2 IGS Web Report http://igs.indiana.edu/survey/projects/Coal_Fines/index.cfm

3 Surface Mine Mine-Run Coal (Raw Coal) Preparation Plant (Washer) Clean Coal Reject (Refuse) Coarse-grained (gob) Fine-grained (slurry, tailings) Ash Spoil (Fragmented and displaced overburden) Power Plant Definitions Spoil = displaced overburden Gob = coarse-grained refuse Slurry (tailings) = fine-grained refuse

4 Objectives Rapid reconnaissance using existing data in a GIS Map areal extents of coal-slurry deposits Estimate thicknesses Calculate volumes Collect preexisting chemical analyses Statistically analyze chemistry values

5 Mapping – Data Sources Historical aerial photographs Dates: 1937 to 1980 Source: IGS archive (160 photos) Digital Orthophoto Quarter Quads (1998) National Agricultural Imagery Program (2003) Indiana Orthophotography Project (2005)

6 Mapping – Feature Identification Coal-preparation plants Pre 1978 Post 1978 Old Ben No. 2 2003 Tecumseh 1953

7 Mapping – Feature Identification Coal slurry deposits Slurry (fine-grained)Gob (coarse-grained) Friar Tuck Mine 1974

8 Mapping – Depositional Settings Berms Minnehaha - 1954 Final-cut pit Airline - 1949 Spoil Chieftain 19461954

9 Mapping – Complex Histories

10 Results – Areal Extents Berm Final-cut pit Spoil Impoundment Not slurry Area (acres) Berms1,213 Final-cut pits764 Spoil deposits788 Total2,765

11 Thickness Estimates – Data Sources Existing data sets: Topography - Digital Line Graphs (USGS) Coal Mine Information System (IGS) Drilling data - National Coal Resource Data System (USGS) Historical aerial photographs

12 Thickness Estimations - Berms Air Quality No. 1 2003 Elevation of top of berm ~ 545 ft Elevation of bottom of impoundment ~ 445 ft (NOTE: Active operation. Impoundment not yet filled. Not included in final calculations.) Total height of Impoundment ~ 100 ft

13 Thickness Estimations – Final-cut pits Lynnville Mine Depth of final-cut pit ~ 75 to 105 ft Elevation of top of final-cut pit ~ 470 – 500 ft Elevation of coal ~ 395 ft

14 Thickness Estimations – Spoil deposits Assumptions: (1) Troughs completely filled. (2) Angle of draw = 30 degrees. (3) Aver. thickness = 1/8 ridge spacing. Latta Mine 1954 Ridge spacing = 66 feet Average depth of troughs = 66/8 = ~ 8.25 ft

15 Results – Thickness Estimations Thickness Estimates (feet) RangeAverage Berms0 to 5410 to 14 Final-cut pits0 to 12538 to 56 Spoil deposits0 to 496 to 8

16 Results – Volumetric Calculations Volumetric estimates (million cubic yards) Berms29 to 39 Final-cut pits56 to 86 Spoil deposits9 to 12 Total94 to 136

17 Recoverable Coal - Assumptions …volume of mapped CSDs represents from 22 to 69 million tons of recoverable coal. This compares with an earlier estimate made by Miller and Eggert (1982) of about 20 million tons. - Final Report Mineability of slurry Final-cut pits = 70 percent Spoil deposits = 60 percent Average weight density of raw slurry = 110 to 120 lbs per cubic foot Recoverable coal = 20 to 40 percent of mineable slurry Volume of raw slurry in situ = 94 to 136 million cubic yards = 22 to 69 million tons of recoverable coal

18 Chemical Characterization Mine sites – 10 Drill holes – 93 Samples – 473 Collection dates – 1970s through early 1980s Analyses Sulfur (weight percent, as received) Ash (weight percent, as received) Btu per pound (as received, moisture- and ash-free)

19 Selected statistical values for 473 individual samples of coal slurry AR: as-received; MAF: moisture- and ash-free; wt %: weight percent Ash, AR (wt %) Sulfur, AR (wt %) Btu/lb, ARBtu/lb, MAF Minimum5.60.410693725 Maximum76.823.71172024975 Average32.24.0709512849 Mode26.72.8754013210

20 Selected statistical values for samples from various mine sites AR: as-received; MAF: moisture- and ash-free; wt %: weight percent MineID_IGS No. of drill holes No. of samples Ash AR (wt %) Sulfur AR (wt %) Btu/lb ARBtu/lb MAF MinnehahaD3187420.22.2689313680 Green ValleyB492320.95.1978013305 Otter CreekB14426.72.6889313025 Friar TuckD493728.12.1809213663 BuckskinK371729.02.7858912873 ChinookC1148130.53.2557713310 LynnvilleK163635.04.3815013344 TecumsehK242835.98.9716811942 AirlineE3119942.44.4714312657 HawthornE4115545.25.8660811920 SUM93454 AVERAGE31.44.1768912972

21 Slurry Disposal Preparation plant pipeline pipe discharge = entry point subaerial fan slurry pond ultrafine coal and clay large, dense fragments of coal and rock coarse coal Cell 1 Cell 2 …a manmade prograding fan-delta system -- Eggert, Miller, and Irwin (1980)

22 Chinook - IGS Sample Locations 1996 1946 Spreadsheet: COAL_SLURRY_ANALYSES_IGS.XLS

23 Chemical Trends – IGS Samples Historical trends – Age of preparation plant versus quality of coal slurry Source coal beds – Quality of source coalbed versus quality of slurry Type of mining – Underground mines versus surface mines Spatial trends – Mixed results. Significant trends within several CSDs (Chinook and Lynnville), but not within others.

24 Loss of slurry or fines in washeries…is a step in the march of progress and eventually some method of utilization will be found. - Coal Age, 1936


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