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AIM for Literacy Solutions to Advance Adolescent Literacy in West Virginia May 2008 West Virginia Department of Education.

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Presentation on theme: "AIM for Literacy Solutions to Advance Adolescent Literacy in West Virginia May 2008 West Virginia Department of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 AIM for Literacy Solutions to Advance Adolescent Literacy in West Virginia May 2008 West Virginia Department of Education

2 As promised… West Virginia Department of Education Who: Literacy Leadership Teams (LLT) What: Webinar 2 LLT roles and responsibilities Year 1 of multi-tiered literacy instruction When: May 28, 2008-Wednesday Where: Any convenient location April 16 th PowerPoint presentation is available at

3 The challenge for the Literacy Leadership Team, then, is to set goals that can be enacted by all stakeholders, measured for progress and revisited yearly for revision. JoAnne Allain (2008)

4 KNOW West Virginia Department of Education The components of AIM for LiteracyThe LLTs roles and responsibilities Year 1 of multi-tiered literacy instruction

5 DO West Virginia Department of Education Identify the levels of support for literacy in a multi- tiered model Define your role on the LLT Plan and organize for implementation of Year 1 of tiered instruction

6 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS West Virginia Department of Education How does a multi-tiered instruction model of literacy support the needs of all students? To what extent will your participation on the LLT encourage collaboration and shared decision-making among your faculty? How will Year 1 create the atmosphere for the process of literacy improvement?

7 West Virginia Department of Education

8 AIM for Literacy Meeting the Needs of All Learners through Tiered Instruction

9 West Virginia Department of Education Levels of Support Individual StudentsClassroom UnitProfessional Development Advanced Tier Students consistently exceed the targets and can handle advance materials; need challenge, extension and enrichment Assessment: Assessment every 6-8 weeks Materials: Standard plus reading 25 books per year; SREB recommends 100 pages of technical text to receive credit for one book Students in the classroom are exceeding the benchmarks as demonstrated through assessment; teachers are models and resources for others; AP and Pre-AP trained teachers Time: Policy 2510 RLA requirement Advanced Placement training and material; Pre- AP instructional strategies and materials; Differentiated Instruction training; Training on adopted instructional materials; Instructional guides and/or standards-based unit plans; Assessments for and of learning

10 West Virginia Department of Education Levels of Support Individual StudentsClassroom UnitProfessional Development Tier 1: Benchmark Students generally can meet the standards; average learner Intervention: Occasional in-class modifications; SBRR and SBRI in vocabulary and comprehension strategies Assessment: Assessment every 6-8 weeks Materials: Adopted grade level instructional materials plus reading 25 books per year; SREB recommends 100 pages of technical text to receive credit for one book 75-80% of students are making good progress; teachers need praise and recognition and may serve as a resource to others; all teachers Time: Policy 2510 RLA requirement SBRR and SBRI in pre reading, during reading and post reading strategies and writing strategies Differentiated Instruction training Training on adopted grade level instructional materials Instructional guides and/or standards-based unit plans Assessments for and of learning

11 West Virginia Department of Education Levels of Support Individual StudentsClassroom UnitProfessional Development Tier 2: Strategic Students are typically between the 30th-49th percentile on normative measures; 1-2 years behind; gaps in skills and knowledge Intervention: Direct instruction with teacher or one- on-one in the form of reteaching, preteaching, adjustments of pace and complexity; separate reading intervention; possible strategic tutoring program Assessment: Assessment every 3-4 weeks to pinpoint problems and target interventions Materials: Standard reading program with added support class and materials plus reading 25 books per year; SREB recommends 100 pages of technical text to receive credit for one book Classrooms where about one-third of the students are not making benchmarks (25- 30%); reading specialists/special education teachers/coaches/content area teachers labeled literacy intensive classes (i.e., social studies class is considered reading intensive) Time: Policy 2510 requirements for RLA block with defined intervention component Collaboration and co- teaching training Training on adopted grade level instructional materials Differentiated Instruction training Instructional guides and/or standards-based unit plans Content area teacher training on instructional strategies in reading and writing SBRR and SBRI: building background knowledge; vocabulary; fluency; comprehension strategies Assessments for and of learning

12 West Virginia Department of Education Levels of Support Individual StudentsClassroom UnitProfessional Development Tier 3: Intensive Students test below the 30 th percentile on normative measures; reading skills are limited Intervention: Assessment every 2 weeks to pinpoint problems and target interventions Materials: Intensive intervention to replace traditional ELA class; special supplementary materials and/or specialized program Classrooms where about half of the students are not meeting benchmark indicators; teachers held accountable to teach the program as designed; reading specialist with assistance from special education/coach Time: Extended time for literacy; usually are temporary replacement programs for grade- level ELA classes Program specific training without exception Training on adopted grade level instructional materials DI training SBRR and SBRI: building background knowledge; vocabulary; fluency; comprehension strategies; writing strategies Assessments for and of learning

13 Roles and Responsibilities of the LLT

14 Identify and discuss the schools strengths and challenges in literacy. AIM Literacy Survey Literacy Capacity Survey Identify and prioritize literacy needs of the students and professional development needs of the teachers. Information serves as the professional conversation about literacy Supports school improvement Provide resources and strategies to support change. Assessments for and of learning

15 Identifying Strengths and Challenges Literacy Capacity Survey 1. Give the Literacy Capacity Survey. 2. Collect results. 3. Use as a planning guide for LLT. Assess Student Needs 1. Which assessment(s) will we use? Large group tests as a first cut Assess all struggling students beyond the WESTEST to determine specific needs (Tier 2 and 3) 2. Place students in appropriate tier. 3. Determine movement in tiers.

16 What is the school-wide emphasis on adolescent literacy? 1. The administrators role in improving the schools literacy opportunities is clearly evident. 2. School leaders encourage collegial decision making. 3. School leaders support integration of literacy instruction across the content areas. 4. School leaders and staff members believe the teaching of reading is their responsibility.

17 Literacy Capacity Survey and the World Café Process Groups sit around tables and discuss guiding questions for a given amount of time. One person stays at the table the entire time to capture the conversation, then share with the next group. When time is called, participants move to a new table with different individuals, hear about the previous conversation, then continue that groups discussion. At the end of several rounds, questions and ideas are recorded on a flip chart.

18 Literacy Capacity Survey Based on your individual and/or team results, what have you discovered? What strengths and needs are suggested? What priorities emerge? What potential roadblocks do you see and how will you overcome them? What are your next steps in the advancing the process building literacy capacity at your school?

19 Determining Needs of Students Most large-group assessments provide a first cut. WESTEST Schools need to collect further critical diagnostic information to begin to understand their students literacy problems. Scholastic Reading Inventory - Gates-MacGinitie, Degree of Reading Power (DRP) Adopted text series test Compile data and determine the number of classes needed for strategic and intensive students. Strategic students need targeted literacy instruction. Intensive students need comprehensive literacy instruction. Communicate with parents.

20 Identifying Resources Tier 1 = Effective Instruction in ALL Classes Standard based unit plans Instructional guides Research based vocabulary instruction Research based comprehension strategies Differentiated Instruction Rubrics Lexiles Assessment for learning

21 Identifying Resources Tier 2 – Strategic All in Tier 1 Strategic tutoring Content specific reading and writing strategies Tier 3 – Intensive All in Tier 1 Specialized training in specific programs (i.e., Wilson Reading)

22 Year 1 Implementation Keys for Success

23 Year 1: 2007/2008 Conduct awareness sessions to build a culture of literacy in your school Agree on what Tier I instruction is at the upper elementary and middle school levels Research best practices for Tier 1 instruction Vocabulary, Comprehension, Fluency, Writing and Motivation Analyze current Tier 1 instruction relative to best practices Implement some new practices across the curriculum Identify universal screening and progress monitoring assessments

24 Challenges from the AIM Pilot Schools Changing teacher opinions about whose responsibility it is to teach reading skills Convincing teachers to try new classroom strategies without making it seem like extra work Movement among tiers Differentiating instruction is more difficult than one size fits all Teachers implementing strategies in isolation, rather than seeing the strategies as a part of their teaching philosophy Assessing in more than one way

25 Successes from the AIM Pilot Schools Students were given timely assessments FOR learning and modifications were made to enhance learning. Content class literacy instruction The following strategies have been implemented this year: K-W-L, Frayer, Reading for a Purpose, Semantic Map, Word Sort, Quick Sketch, Venn Diagram, Anticipation Guide, RAFT, NICK, Word Map, Think Aloud. Increase use of small group instruction Increased targeted instruction

26 Additional Resources West Virginia Department of Education National Association of Secondary School Principals p?CID=52747&DOC=FILE.pdf Joann Allain Sopris West $34.49 JoAnn Allain Sopris West

27 Additional Resources material/reports/reading_next Douglas Fisher & Gay Ivey ASCD

28 Additional Resources

29 Improving adolescent literacy requires that this goal be shared and central to the mission for a school staff. Buy-in is not a one time event but rather an ongoing process. Don Deshler (2006)

30 Next Steps Create a tentative LLT meeting calendar. Conduct the Literacy Capacity Survey. Start building your culture of literacy at the beginning of the school year.

31 Next Time Who: Literacy Leadership Teams (LLT) What: Webinar 3 Strengthening the Core Program Universal Assessments When: August 27, :15-4:15 p.m. Where: Any convenient location in your building

32 Contact Information West Virginia Department of Education Linda Palenchar RTI Coordinator Office of Special Programs, Extended and Early Learning (304) Terry Reale Reading English Language Arts Coordinator Office of Instruction (304)


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