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Using Data to Drive School Guidance and Advisement Activities Barbara Blackburn, MA, LPC WVDE School Counseling Coordinator.

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Presentation on theme: "Using Data to Drive School Guidance and Advisement Activities Barbara Blackburn, MA, LPC WVDE School Counseling Coordinator."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Using Data to Drive School Guidance and Advisement Activities Barbara Blackburn, MA, LPC WVDE School Counseling Coordinator

3 Objectives: Participants will: Learn how to access, interpret and present data Learn how to use data to guide your Guidance and Advisement Program

4 Student Success

5 Equity?

6 Opportunity Gaps: Are some students provided more opportunities than others? Access to rigorous curriculum Access to quality teachers School policies and climate Special Education Screening and Placement Participation in Support Services Tutoring, Mentoring/ Participation in Support Services Participation in Extra/Co curricular programs Special Needs Accommodations Test Prep Programs Dual Credit Programs Early enrollment in college courses Opportunity Gap Data What do you want to know?

7 Accountability System Results Report – Program Guidance Curriculum Closing the Gap Impact Over Time School Counselor Performance Standards The Program Audit

8 What Is Your Relationship with Education Data? Nonexistent? Reactive? Proactive?

9 The Power of Data Provide objective snapshots of the students, school, community Surface evidence of access or equity issues Break old myths – eliminate denial Create urgency/energy for change Provide direction – data driven decisions

10 The Power of Data Challenge existing behavior, funding patterns, programs, & policies Use as an accountability tool Focuses resources where they are most needed Supports grant writing efforts

11 Using Data to Spur Systemic Change School Counselors must be proficient in: Accessing data Analyzing data Interpreting data Presenting data School Counselors must use data to: - Recognize barriers to learning Point out the system inequities Advocate for system change Create urgency for change

12 Demographic Data What do you want to know? Student demographics: what are the characteristics of our students? Gender Ethnicity Socio-economic status (free/reduced lunch) Limited English Proficiency Family configuration Mobility

13 Rhode Island Shifts in Student Demographics Source: US Census Bureau, Population Projections, in Education Week, September 27, 2000.

14 Attainment Data What do you want to know? Attainment: How many make it to - and beyond key points in the system? Advance to next grade Transition from middle school to high school Graduation rate Type of high school diploma Matriculation to an institution of higher education Persistence beyond freshman year Earning a college diploma

15 Highest Educational Attainment for Every 100 Kindergartners Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. March Current Population Survey, , In The Condition of Education 2002 (Age 25-29)

16 Ninth Grade Retention Rate Reduction as a Result of School Counselor Interventions

17 Achievement Data What do you want to know? Achievement: What does achievement look like at different levels and with different groups of students? Overall Achievement Grade point average Standardized test scores, SAT, ACT, State tests Passing all subjects Periodic assessment Semester grades End of course tests Ongoing classroom assessment Class assignment grades Tests

18 Achievement-Related Data Course enrollment patterns Discipline referrals Suspension rates Alcohol, tobacco and other drug violations Attendance rates Parent involvement Extracurricular activities

19 African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Do Math at Same Levels As White 13 Year Olds Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)

20 State Data Black eight-graders and white fourth- graders had almost identical scores in math on a national standardized test in 2003.

21 Student Behavior Data What do you want to know? Student Behavior Choices: What are students doing? Attendance Discipline referrals Classroom behavior Homework completion Enrollment patterns Algebra in 9 th grade Upper level math and science Honors, AP, college credit

22 Low-Income Students are Less Likely to be Enrolled in a College Prep. Track Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988: Second Follow-Up, 1992 in: A Profile of the American High School Senior in (p. 36) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, June 1995.

23 Program Evaluation Data What do you want to know? Process data Perception data Results data

24 Process data What do you want to know? What you did for whom Evidence that event occurred How activity was conducted Did the program follow the prescribed practice?

25 Process Data - Examples Weekly (32) academic support groups with 12 students each were held th grade students received the The Four Year Plan guidance lessons All 4 th and 5 th (112) grade students participated in the bus buddy (4) guidance lessons

26 Academic Results Interventions (6-8) 72 students avoided retention

27 Perception Data What do you want to know? What others think, know or demonstrate data. Measures competency achieved, knowledge gained or attitudes beliefs of students Pre-post Competency achievement Surveys Evaluations Measures what students are perceived to have gained in knowledge

28 Perception Data - Examples Competency Achievement Every student in grades 9-12 completed a 4 year plan Every 10 th grade student completed an interest inventory Knowledge Gained 89% of students demonstrate knowledge of promotion/ retention criteria 92% can identify Early Warning Signs of violence Attitudes or Beliefs 74%of students believe fighting is wrong 29% of students feel safe at school 78% know the name of their school counselor

29 Results Data What do you want to know? So WHAT data Hard data Application data Proof your program has (or has not) positively impacted students ability to utilize the knowledge, attitudes and skills to effect behavior Attendance Behavior Academic achievement

30 Results Data - Examples 42 students avoided retention Graduation rates improved 14% over three years Attendance improved among 9 th grade males by 49%

31 Possibilities… There are schools that show things can be different? Find schools like yours that have: Closed the opportunity gaps Closed the achievement gap

32 Learn to Analyze and Interpret Data

33 Data Analysis: Keep It Simple Descriptive Data Powerful Numbers and percentages Rationale for Use The benchmark is ALL Usually working with entire population Easier for educators and public to understand

34 Basic Ways to Analyze Data Start with simple statistics - averages, %s

35 Basic Ways to Analyze Data

36 Data Over Time What do you want to know? Immediate Intermediate Long range (Impact Over Time)

37 Data Over Time - Examples Immediate – data measures the immediate impact - pre-post test, p Intermediate – data collected over a short period of time - improved grades after counseling group, p Long-range – Longitudinal - data stretch over time, p.73

38 Basic Ways to Analyze Data Start with simple statistics - averages, %s Longitudinal = stretching data out over time Spencer Owen School Corporation ISTEP Tests

39 Bus Buddy Program Results

40 Basic Ways to Analyze Data Start with simple statistics - averages, %s Longitudinal Disaggregate = slicing a piece of data The Power of Disaggregated Data Disaggregation is not a problem-solving strategy. It is a problem-finding strategy --Victoria Bernhardt

41 Basic Ways to Analyze Data Start with simple statistics - averages, %s Longitudinal Disaggregate Average MPS Graduation Rate 46% African American 32% Asian 52% Latino 31% Native American 27% White 66% = slicing a piece of data

42 Basic Ways to Analyze Data Disaggregate

43 The Power of Data Provide objective snapshots of the students, school, community Surface evidence of access or equity issues Break old myths – eliminate denial Create urgency/energy for change Provide direction – data driven decisions Challenge existing behavior, funding patterns, programs, & policies Use as an accountability tool Focuses resources where they are most needed Supports grant writing efforts

44 How Not to Use Data To place blame To focus on the past To maintain the status quo

45 Data Challenges May be the most difficult piece for counselors Counselors must interpret data collect data get comfortable with data Not turning counselors into statisticians or researchers Simplify/streamline by delivering to counselors that data which will serve to reach overall goals

46 The Payoff… Who Did This? Reduced 9 th grade failure rate by 61.9% Reduced Senior failure by 78.4%. Increased PSAT participation by 106 students Doubled the number of African American students that took the AP Exam Received 70-80% approval ratings from students about SC programs

47 Collaborate on Data Data may be difficult to get – it is confidential Determine who has the data School level District level State level Find out what data is available Can they make it simple to use?

48 Who do you collaborate with? Evaluation and research experts Counselor Educators Staff development experts Conduct Data Academies Independent Organizations Private groups – EDSTAR.org Student View – Hazelden Zoomerang.com, SurveyMonkey.com

49 Set Measurable Goals and Objectives Goals - broad statements that describe expected outcomes Objectives - clear, realistic, measurable and time- limited statements of actions which, when completed, will move towards goal achievement.

50 Example of Goals and Objectives Area GoalObjective Academic To increase number of promotions In 05-06, the promotion rate of 3 rd grade students will increase by 10% as compared to Behavior To create a safer school climate In 05-06, incidents of fighting at school will be reduced by 5% as compared to Attendan ce To increase the attendance rate In 05-06, the attendance rate of 9 th grade repeating students will increase by 50%.

51 Results Report How are students different as a RESULT of what you do? What does the data tell you? Was the program successful? What worked? What did NOT work? What needs to be changed?

52 Longitudinal Study Questions 1) Will the use of the Protective Schools Model have any impact on academic progress and attendance for the participating students? 2) Will lowering the student to counselor ratio and fully implementing the CCBG program have an increase on academic progress and attendance for the students?

53 Reading – 3 rd grade, – 4 th grade, – 5 th grade

54 Math

55 Attendance

56 School Climate Results Examples of preliminary gains are as follows: Teachers reported an increase in student safety at the project schools. (Source: TUSD School Quality Survey) Students responded that students of different races & ethnic backgrounds are getting along better at their school. ( Source: TUSD School Quality Survey)

57 Parents indicated an increase in satisfaction with their school. (Source: TUSD School Quality Survey) All Principals indicated increased contact with students and a more consistent program (in classrooms, groups and interventions) with increased counseling staff. Principals consider the counselor indispensable. (Source: Principal interviews – March and April 2003) School Climate Results

58 Principal Comments Principals saw counselor as the primary change agent for the school Principals understood how the counselor can contribute to student achievement Principals acknowledge that the school counselor knows every student and is the soul or heart of the school.

59 Advocacy/Leadership Ask Hard Questions Gather & Present Data Task Group Facilitation Classroom Guidance Small Group Interventions Individual Interventions Referral DATA System Focused Activities Student Focused Activities School Counseling Connected to the Mission of the School

60 Results Report How are students different as a RESULT of what you do? What does the data tell you? Was the program successful? What worked? What did NOT work? What needs to be changed?

61 Results Report- A Tool For Ensuring program is carried out Every student is served National Student Standards are addressed Developmentally appropriate Documenting process, perception, results data; immediate, intermediate, and long range impact of program Analyze effects Share successes Advocate for systemic change

62 Results Report Examples Guidance Curriculum Results Report, p.118 Closing the Gap Results Report, p. 117

63 DATA GOAL Brainstorm What needs to change? Strategies/programs to address need

64 Reality Check What does the data tell you about the current situation in your school? What needs to change? What can the school counseling program do to create the necessary changes to support student success?

65 Data Interpretation Look for: Patterns Gaps Questions: What problems or needs surface? What achievement gaps exist? What opportunity gaps do the data suggest?

66 Writing Goals and Objectives for Action Plans Choose a reasonable number of action plans Guidance and Advisement goals should be written in the terms of improving: Academics Behavior Attendance

67 Examples of Data to Examine Test Scores Achievement State National Enrollment Honors/AP Classes College Track Special Education LEP Graduation Rate By Gender By Ethnicity By SES Attendance Absences Tardies By Grade Level Discipline By Classroom Types of Problems Gender GPA/Class Rank By Gender By Ethnicity By SES Retention Rates By Subject Area By Grade Level By Gender, Ethnicity Post Secondary Plans Special Education By Gender By Ethnicity By SES Dropout Rate Grade Levels Gender, Ethnicity… Reasons Why

68 Accountability … Getting Started Use what you are already doing (e.g., small group or one classroom). Use data that are already being collected such as attendance, behavior, grades, or other scores. Keep it simple – percent change, pre to post changes.

69 Accountability … Getting Started Show several years of growth Connect to student standards Dont measure EVERYTHING Make decisions based on needs of district, site and access to data Goal is to learn from data, not be evaluated on data

70 Questions and Comments CONTACT INFORMATION Barbara Brady Blackburn, MA, LPC School Counseling Coordinator WV Department of Education Bldg. 6, Room Kanawha Blvd. East Charleston, WV Phone: Fax:


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