Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Introduction to MIS1 Copyright © 1998-2002 by Jerry Post Introduction to MIS Chapter 13 Organizing the MIS Resources.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Introduction to MIS1 Copyright © 1998-2002 by Jerry Post Introduction to MIS Chapter 13 Organizing the MIS Resources."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to MIS1 Copyright © 1998-2002 by Jerry Post Introduction to MIS Chapter 13 Organizing the MIS Resources

2 Introduction to MIS2 Organizing IS Resources Operations Tactics Strategy

3 Introduction to MIS3 Outline Managing Information Systems Functions MIS Roles MIS Jobs International Comparisons Outsourcing MIS Organization: Centralization Intranets and Thin Clients Cases: Financial Services Appendix: Project Management

4 Introduction to MIS4 Hardware administration Software development Support end user development Database administration Advocacy Access to corporate data Software training and support Corporate computing standards MIS Roles Hardware administration Software support Corporate data access Software development End user support Computing standards DB administration Advocacy

5 Introduction to MIS5 Network and Telecommunications Hardware Repair Training and User Support Some MIS Roles

6 Introduction to MIS6 IS Management OperationsNetworksSystems DevelopmentUser Support Computerworld 1995 Salary Survey CIO/VP IS$91,568 Director IS Operations72,982 Networks70,050 Systems Development72,982 Computer manager$49,545 Supervisor39,525 Lead operator30,304 Operator25,383 Technical specialist36,801 Telecom. manager$60,278 Telecom. specialist46,974 Network administrator42,880 LAN manager46,802 Support manager$49,825 Help desk manager41,756 Help desk operator29,486 PC technical specialist33,045 Business analyst37,205 Project manager$58,386 Sr. systems analyst51,910 Systems analyst45,416 Sr. systems program.51,731 Systems programmer41,887 Sr. programmer/analyst45,981 Programmer/analyst37,203 Database manager55,669 Database analyst47,774 Data security admin.47,484 Salaries 1995

7 Introduction to MIS7 Salaries 1997-1998 IS Management Operations NetworksSystems Development User Support http://careers.wsj.comhttp://careers.wsj.com (Robert Half 1997) Computerworld 9/7/1998 http://www.computerworld.com CIO/VP IS$126,000 Director MIS94,000 Systems Development79,500 Senior manager$61,000 Manager50,500 Lead operator35,000 Telecom. manager$71,000 Telecom. specialist56,500 Network architect69,000 LAN/WAN specialist54,500 Network administrator45,500 Support manager$55,000 Help desk manager47,500 Instructor42,000 PC technical specialist36,000 Sr. Project manager$72,000 Project manager61,500 Systems analyst52,000 Programmer/analyst44,500 Programmer36,000 Includes bonus Database Database manager$74,000 Database administrator61,000 Database analyst55,000 Specialists ERP analyst$80,000+ CASE tools61,000 Systems programmer54,000 Lotus Notes developer52,500 Q/A specialist49,000 Webmaster47,000

8 Introduction to MIS8 Salaries 1998-1999 IS Management Operations NetworksSystems Development User Support http://careers.wsj.comhttp://careers.wsj.com (Robert Half 1997) Computerworld 9/7/1998 http://www.computerworld.com CIO/VP IS$140,000 Director MIS94,000 Systems Development98,000 Senior manager$66,000 Manager50,500 Lead operator39,000 Telecom. manager$71,000 Telecom. specialist57,500 Network architect69,000 LAN/WAN specialist57,000 Network administrator53,000 Support manager$54,000 Help desk manager49,000 Instructor42,000 PC technical specialist37,500 Sr. Project manager$76,000 Project manager61,500 Systems analyst52,000 Programmer/analyst44,500 Programmer36,000 Includes bonus Database Database manager$74,000 Database administrator61,000 Database analyst55,000 Specialists ERP analyst$80,000+ CASE tools61,000 Systems programmer54,000 Lotus Notes developer52,500 Q/A specialist49,000 Webmaster53,000

9 Introduction to MIS9 Salaries 2001 IS Management Operations NetworksSystems Development User Support http://careers.wsj.com http://www.computerworld.com CIO/VP IS/CTO$165,000 Director$106,000 Manager74,000 Lead operator42,000 Computer operator35,000 Director$106,000 Manager83,000 Administrator60,000 Network analyst40,000 Junior analyst34,000 Manager$69,000 Help desk operator40,000 PC technical support43,000 Director$123,000 Manager88,000 Project manager85,000 System analyst79,000 Senior developer74,000 Programmer/analyst55,000 Junior programmer45,000 Includes bonus Database Manager$94,000 Administrator89,000 Database analyst67,000 Internet Manager$94,000 Webmaster72,000 Application developer70,000 EC specialist74,000 EDI specialist66,000 Security Manager$86,000 Administrator72,000 Specialist64,000 IS audit manager81,000 IS audit staff53,000

10 Introduction to MIS10 The Economist: 7/30/94 International Salaries

11 Introduction to MIS11 International Salaries NationProgrammer/Analyst Salary United States55,000 Britain57,000 Russia10,800 India2,508

12 Introduction to MIS12 Arnett and Litecky, 1994 MIS Job Skills Needed Computerworld, 1998

13 Introduction to MIS13 Skills in Demand Rank200119981994 1ERP Networking 2Object engineeringGroupwareDatabase 3Data warehouse and data visualization DatabaseUNIX 4GroupwareNetworkingVisual Basic 5WirelessCOBOL

14 Introduction to MIS14 Forecast for 1999: $42.6 billion Outsourcing

15 Introduction to MIS15 Outsourcing Company19911995199719992000 IBM Global Services0.417.724.635.037.0 EDS1.212.415.218.719.2 CSC0.44.26.69.410.5 Accenture0.54.26.39.59.8 ADP0.33.04.96.37.0 Affiliated Computer0.160.41.22.02.1 Fiserv0.230.71.01.41.7 Perot Systems0.160.30.81.21.1 Total (billion dollars)3.442.960.683.588.4

16 Introduction to MIS16 Specialized Talent Needed Complex Market Structure Security & Control Level of Technology Cost of reaching state of the art Fixed Costs When any of these characteristics increases (moves outwards), there is less reason to use outsourcing. Outsourcing Evaluation

17 Introduction to MIS17 Outsourcing Forces Globalization, new competitors. Shorter product life-cycles, mass customization. Rapidly changing markets, flexible manufacturing. Pressure on profits. Need to focus on increasing revenues and decreasing fixed/semi-fixed costs. Need for flexibility and responsiveness. Outsource non-revenue generate functions (staff/operations) Desire to minimize amount of management time devoted to non-revenue generating functions. Economies of Scale - leverage expertise and methodologies. - invest in expensive technologies (state-of-the-art) - process-oriented approach Economies of Scope Want one vendor to provide multiple functions. Cost cutting, staff cuts, loss of middle management. Big Outsourcing Vendors & Big 6 Firms

18 Introduction to MIS18 Summary of MIS Organization

19 Introduction to MIS19 Data and software MIS personnel Hardware User departments Complete Centralization

20 Introduction to MIS20 Hardware Centralization Advantages Easier to share Data Expensive hardware (printers) Easier to control Purchases Usage Less duplication Efficiency less unused resources

21 Introduction to MIS21 Software Centralization Advantages Compatibility Bulk buying discounts Easier training Ease of maintenance & upgrades

22 Introduction to MIS22 Data Centralization Advantages Easy backup Easier to Share Less duplication Security control\monitoring

23 Introduction to MIS23 Personnel Centralization Advantages Workers with similar backgrounds Easier training Straightforward growth path Specialized staff Easier to see/control costs

24 Introduction to MIS24 Growth of PCs

25 Introduction to MIS25 MIS personnel are members of user departments Marketing Finance Accounting Human Resource Management Complete Decentralization

26 Introduction to MIS26 Hardware Decentralization Advantages Less chance of total breakdown Users get personalized equipment Micros are cheaper than mainframes

27 Introduction to MIS27 Software Decentralization Advantages Different users have different preferences Easier access Customization without affecting others Can overcome objections Lower prices minimize benefits of bulk purchases. Similarities of packages make training easier. Conversion tools enable sharing.

28 Introduction to MIS28 Data Decentralization Advantages Not all data needs to be shared Easier find and access Control & politics

29 Introduction to MIS29 Personnel Decentralization Advantages Closer to users Faster response More time spent with users Better understanding/communication Different career path

30 Introduction to MIS30 Thin Clients Server Data and applications Thin client Browser-based access User interface

31 Introduction to MIS31 Intranet Network Solutions High-bandwidth connections between servers. Standard Internet connections to users.

32 Introduction to MIS32 Simple Object Application Protocol Bank Server Your Company Server Manager or Client The Internet Your Financial Application Bank Service Currency converter: Date, InCurrency, Outcurrency SOAP

33 Introduction to MIS33 Marketing Accounting Finance Human Resource Management Central MIS staff: Operations, network and systems programmers Server Hardware Shared Data & Software MIS support Transaction processing Corporate standards Network management Shared databases Intermediate (Client-Server)

34 Introduction to MIS34 Client-Server Benefits

35 Introduction to MIS35 Organizational Are operations interdependent? -planning -development -physical resources -operations Can subunits relate solely through information & messages? Does corporate culture support decentralization? Strengths End users gain control. Supports workgroups. Enables new organizational structures. Increased organizational flexibility. Weaknesses Possible short term bias in decision making. Might not be optimal use of resources for corporation. IS staff might lose cohesiveness and support. Decentralization Summary

36 Introduction to MIS36 Cases: Financial Services

37 Introduction to MIS37 Cases: Fidelity Investments Charles Schwab & Co. What is the companys current status? What is the Internet strategy? How does the company use information technology? What are the prospects for the industry? www.fidelity.com www.schwab.com

38 Introduction to MIS38 Appendix: Project Management Projects Goal Need a well-defined goal Good example: Put a man on the moon. Bad example: Improve the IRS information systems. Scope Size and complexity of the project. Match the management techniques to the project scope. Schedule Break project into tasks Tasks depend on other tasks (you cant paint a wall until it is built). Tasks take time to complete (duration) Tasks require resources. Resources Worker time is usually the most important to schedule. Workrooms, machinery, and so on.

39 Introduction to MIS39 Project Management Steps Define the project. Create the plan. Track and manage the project as it proceeds. Close the project when the goal is achieved or the project is cancelled.

40 Introduction to MIS40 Microsoft Project Specialized database Tasks (start, duration, description, dependence) Resources (costs, needs, assignments) Specialized views of the data Gantt ChartHighlight task duration. PERT ChartHighlight task dependence. CalendarShow scheduled tasks. Task UsageShow assigned resources. Tracking GanttCompare estimates to actual. Task SheetDetailed task data. Resource views Resource GraphTrack resources over time. Resource SheetDetailed resource data. Resource UsageTasks assigned to resources.

41 Introduction to MIS41 Sample: Spring Forward Century Sunday, April 2, 2000 25 miles 50 miles 100 miles Choose starting point Legal paperwork Establish routes Create databases Create promotional materials Create commemorative shirts Register riders Organize volunteer groups Advertise ride Plan rest stops Plan registration Final clean up Thank you notes Write project notes Planning the ride After the ride Ride day is a separate project SpringForwardCentury.mpp Organize Spring Forward Century.mpp

42 Introduction to MIS42 Microsoft Project: Gantt Chart Organize Spring Forward Century.mpp

43 Introduction to MIS43 Gantt Chart (continued)

44 Introduction to MIS44 Resource Usage You need to get some tasks done sooner, or get more volunteers on the day before the ride. You need to start earlier, or get volunteers to do more of the organizing tasks.

45 Introduction to MIS45 Ride Day SpringForwardCentury.mpp


Download ppt "Introduction to MIS1 Copyright © 1998-2002 by Jerry Post Introduction to MIS Chapter 13 Organizing the MIS Resources."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google