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Annual New Bilingual/ESL/ELS Supervisors Training 2008

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Presentation on theme: "Annual New Bilingual/ESL/ELS Supervisors Training 2008"— Presentation transcript:

1 Annual New Bilingual/ESL/ELS Supervisors Training 2008
Presenters: Raquel Sinai, Lori Ramella, Ericka Reed Office of Student Achievement and Accountability New Jersey Department of Education

2 Annual New Bilingual/ESL/ELS Supervisors Training, 2008 Objectives
Participants will gain an understanding of: N.J. law and code that govern language assistance programs in schools; Federal NCLB Title III requirements for standards, assessments and accountability for English language learners (ELLs); Language assistance program models and how to develop a program to best meet the needs of ELLs in a district; NJDOE reporting requirements. Available professional development resources; and Participants will become part of a community of professionals dedicated to helping English language learners make an effective transition to U.S. schools and achieve academic success.

3 State Profile of Limited English Proficient Students

4 Student Profile Number of language minority students 279,366 Number of limited English proficient (LEP) students 61,904 Number of languages represented by New Jersey students 168

5 State and Federal Guidelines

6 Language Services for Limited English Proficient Students (LEP)
The Bilingual Education Law of 1974 (N.J.S.A to 26) stipulates that districts must establish bilingual education programs when enrollment of limited English proficient (LEP) students from the same language reaches 20 or more students in one district. New Jersey Administrative Code (N.J.A.C. 6A:15) outlines the programmatic and administrative requirements for school districts that enroll students who are limited English proficient.

7 New Jersey Bilingual Administrative Code N.J.A.C. 6A:15
Ensure that all limited English proficient (LEP) students as defined in this chapter are provided with a free, appropriate public education as defined in N.J.S.A. 18A: to 26; Ensure that the rights of LEP students are protected; Ensure the provision of bilingual education and related services; Assist district boards of education in providing educational services to LEP students; and Ensure the evaluation of the effectiveness of the education of limited English proficient students

8 Identifying LEP Students
Maintain a census indicating all students whose native language is other than English; Develop a screening process, initiated by a home language survey, to determine which students in K to 12th grade must be tested to determine English language proficiency. K-12 students who are not screened out must be tested with a department-approved English language proficiency test In addition, the following indicators must be considered (Multiple measures): level of reading in English; Previous academic performance; Achievement on standardized tests in English; and Teacher judgment

9 Identifying LEP Students (con’t.)
Students who do not meet the Department standard on a Department-approved language proficiency test and who have at least one other indicator, are students of limited English proficiency. State and federal law require parental notification and consent for placement in a language assistance program

10 English Language Proficiency Tests
Approved Tests for Identification and Placement of LEP Students: IDEA Proficiency Test (IPT) Maculaitis II (MACII) Test of English Language Proficiency Language Assessment Scales (LAS) WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT) Comprehensive English Language Learning Assessment (CELLA) Language Assessment Scales Links (LAS Links ) ACCESS for ELLs® (Spring, 2008)

11 Title III No Child Left Behind
Purpose: To help ensure that limited English proficient students attain English proficiency, develop high levels of academic achievement in English and meet the same academic standards as all students are expected to meet.

12 Title III Formula Grants to States and Districts
Apply through consolidated NCLB application process Subgrants must be at least $10,000 or districts may form consortia to meet minimum

13 Title III of NCLB Requirements
Standards: WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Assessment: ACCESS for ELLs® English Proficiency Test Accountability: Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives

14 Accountability Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives for English Language Proficiency Students must make progress in English language proficiency for each year that they are instructed in a language assistance program. Objective for Attainment of English Language Proficiency Grades K years or less in a program Grades years or less in a program

15 Language Assistance Programs and Services

16 How can I possibly address all their language needs?
Group Activity Oh my goodness! I have all these students that speak different languages! How can I possibly address all their language needs?

17 Language Assistance Programs and Services
Four Types of Programs Full-time Bilingual Program with ESL support Alternative programs that use students’ native-language for instruction (Bilingual Part-time, Bilingual Tutorial, Bilingual Resource) Alternative programs that are English-based (High-Intensity ESL, Sheltered English Instruction) ESL-Only English Language Services (ELS)

18 Scenario #1 The district has over 200 Spanish-speaking students and over 20 bilingual-certified teachers in the entire district. There are large populations of Spanish-speaking students throughout grade levels K-12. What type of instructional program would be most effective for this school district?

19 Full-Time Bilingual Program with ESL Support
Full-time program of instruction in all subjects which a child is required by law or rule to receive, administered in the native language of the limited English proficient student and also in English. A bilingual program must be provided when there are 20 or more limited English proficient students in any one language classification enrolled within the school district.

20 Scenario #2 The district has approximately 30 Korean-Speaking students, 25 Japanese-speaking students and 5 bilingual-certified teachers(2 Korean bilingual, 2 Japanese bilingual, and 1 Spanish Bilingual). The bilingual students are dispersed throughout grade levels, with a high concentration of port-of-entry students in the high school. What type of instructional program would be most effective for this school district?

21 Scenario #3 The district has 22 Haitian Creole-speaking students, 20 Gujarati-speaking students, and 3 bilingual-certified teachers(1 Haitian Creole-speaking bilingual/ math, 1 Gujarati-speaking bilingual/math and 1 Spanish- speaking Bilingual/science). The number of Haitian-Creole bilingual students is higher in the high school than the elementary school. The Gujarati bilingual students are dispersed throughout all grade levels. What type of instructional program would be most effective for this school district?

22 Alternative programs that use students’ native-language for instruction (Bilingual Part-time, Bilingual Tutorial, Bilingual Resource) Bilingual Part-Time: Students are mainstreamed in English program classes, but receive daily instruction by a certified bilingual teacher in mathematics and reading. Bilingual Tutorial: Students are mainstreamed in English program classes, but receive daily tutoring by a certified bilingual teacher for specific content areas. Bilingual Resource: Students are mainstreamed in the English program classes, but receive daily support by a certified bilingual teacher in identified subjects and for special projects

23 Scenario #4 The district has 35 Polish students, 75 Arabic students and 5 ESL-certified teachers. All of the Arabic students are in the high school and the language proficiency levels vary across grade levels. The Polish bilingual students are dispersed throughout all grade levels, with a large number in kindergarten. What type of instructional program would be most effective for this school district?

24 Alternative programs that are English-based (High-Intensity ESL, Sheltered English Instruction)
High-Intensity ESL: Students receive two or more periods a day of ESL instruction. One period is the standard ESL class, and the other period is tutorial or ESL reading class Sheltered Instruction: Students are mainstreamed in content area classes, but receive instruction by a teacher who has been trained in the Sheltered Instruction techniques.

25 Scenario #5 The district has 35 students who speak 15 different languages. The students are dispersed throughout the district, with a high concentration of port-of-entry students in the middle and high school. There are 3 certified ESL Teachers in the district. What type of instructional program would be most effective for this school district?

26 ESL-Only A daily developmental second language program of up to two periods of instruction based on students’ needs. An ESL-Only program must be provided when there are 10 or more LEP students enrolled within the school district.

27 Scenario #6 The district has 7 students who speak 3 different languages. The students are dispersed throughout the district. What type of instructional program would be most effective for this school district?

28 English Language Services (ELS)
Services designed to improve the English language skills of students of limited English proficiency. These services are provided in districts with less than 10 students of limited English proficiency. It is recommended that districts provide minutes of ESL instruction weekly.

29 Data Reporting Requirements

30 LEP Enrollment 2008-2009 As of October 15
Native language spoken at home LEP students PreK-12 Special Ed. LEP Collected via

31 LEP Exit School Year Required for Title III of No Child Left Behind Based on the ACCESS for ELLs® test scores The number and percent of students who achieved proficiency and exited in and Verification of the date of enrollment in the district

32 Immigrant Student Count 2008-09
Annually, in March districts report on the number of immigrant students The number of eligible immigrant students (Pre K-12) enrolled in the school district and the number of eligible immigrant students enrolled in nonprofit, nonpublic schools within the district Districts experiencing a “significant increase” may receive immigrant funds under Title III.

33 Eligibility Criteria for Immigrant Funds
combined public and nonpublic immigrant student enrollment must be at least a 2% increase as compared to the average of the two previous years total public and nonpublic enrollment must be 20 or more immigrant students do not have be eligible for Title III funds

34 Federal Definition of Immigrant Student
Aged 3 to 21 Were not born in any state, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands (St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John) Have not been attending one or more schools in one or more states for more than three full academic years.

35 ESL/Bilingual/ELS Three-Year Program Plans
Program plans are required every three years for Bilingual, ESL and English Language Services New program plans were requested for 2008 to 2011

36 Bilingual Waiver Requests
Submitted annually in June District must demonstrate that a full-time bilingual program is impractical Instructional alternative (high intensity ESL, bilingual part-time, bilingual resource, sheltered English instruction) must be provided

37 Professional Development

38 Professional Development Opportunities
Professional Development Calendar: Bilingual/ESL Model Program Resource Centers English Language Learners in the Mainstream Tutorial Sheltered Instruction Training

39 Bilingual/ESL Model Program Resource Centers 2008-10
Clifton Public Schools, Passaic County, for the K-5 Sheltered ESL Program with Bilingual Support Program in schools 12, 13, 14 and 17 Howell Township Public Schools, Monmouth County, K-5 ESL Program, Southard Elementary School Linden Public Schools, Union County, K-12 ESL Program Perth Amboy Public Schools, Middlesex County, K-12 Bilingual Program Red Bank Regional High School District, Monmouth County, for the 9-12 ESL Program Roselle Public Schools, Union County, for the K-3 Bilingual Program at Harrison Elementary School West New York Public Schools, Hudson County, K-12 Bilingual Program

40 English Language Learners in the Mainstream Tutorial
teacher videos student audio segments

41 Sheltered Instruction Training
A professional development model with an effective approach for teaching limited English proficient students both language and content.

42 Sheltered Instruction Training
Fall institutes at three regional locations throughout the State of New Jersey. (Rowan University, Kean University, and New Jersey City University) On-site support by college faculty Provide training to elementary teachers and secondary content teachers on effective sheltered-instruction strategies Build capacity of teachers to provide turn-key training and coaching on sheltered instruction for ELLs

43 Resources Bilingual Education website: WIDA: NJTESOL-NJBE: Colorin Colorado: Reference websites (handout) New supervisor list

44 New Jersey Department of Education
Office of Student Achievement and Accountability Bureau of Bilingual/ESL Education James F. Curry, Manager, Raquel Sinai, Bilingual/ESL Coordinator, Lori Ramella, Bilingual/ESL Education Program Specialist, Ericka Reed, Bilingual/ESL Education Program Specialist, (609)


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