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New Jersey Department of Education RAC Partnership Regional Meetings June 26/27/28, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "New Jersey Department of Education RAC Partnership Regional Meetings June 26/27/28, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 New Jersey Department of Education RAC Partnership Regional Meetings June 26/27/28, 2012

2 2 Purpose of RAC regional meetings: Provide progress updates Provide an update on the model curriculum Clarify county office role Provide Title I updates Introduce the Executive Directors for Regional Achievement RAC partnership preparation Share key dates Answer questions Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) Welcome

3 3 RAC Updates

4 Context for the Regional Achievement Centers (RACs) Through New Jerseys approved federal waiver from provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the RACs represent the Departments most ambitious, focused effort to date to improve student achievement across the state: Shift focus from all schools to low performing schools Significant resources aligned with proven turnaround principles State resources and activities coordinated to support RACs 4 The Department is undergoing a fundamental shift from a system of primarily oversight and monitoring to service delivery and support.

5 5 RAC locations are organized geographically…. Each RAC field team will have an office within the region Indicates Location of Regional HQ CountiesRegionRAC Location Morris - Sussex - Warren1No office Bergen - Passaic2Passaic County Office, Paterson Essex - Hudson3LRC, East Orange Hunterdon - Mercer - Somerset - Union 4DOE, Trenton Middlesex – Monmouth - Ocean 5Monmouth County Office, Neptune Camden - Burlington6In discussion Atlantic - Cape May - Cumberland - Salem - Gloucester 7Gloucester County Office, Clarksboro

6 The Key to Accountability: RAC Turnaround Principles 6 8 Turnaround Principles 1.School Climate and Culture: A climate conducive to learning and a culture of high expectations 2.School Leadership: The principal has the ability to lead the turnaround effort 3.Standards Aligned Curriculum, Assessment and Intervention System: Teachers have the foundational documents and instructional materials needed to teach to the rigorous college and career ready standards that have been adopted 4.Instruction: Teachers utilize research-based effective instruction to meet the needs of all students 5.Use of Time: Time is designed to better meet student needs and increase teacher collaboration focused on improving teaching and learning 6.Use of Data: School-wide use of data focused on improving teaching and learning, as well as climate and culture 7.Staffing Practices: The skills to better recruit, retain and develop effective teachers and school leaders 8.Family and Community Engagement: Increased academically focused family and community engagement

7 7 RAC Staff Team State Turnaround Coach State Elementary Literacy Specialist State Secondary Literacy Specialist State Mathematics Specialist State Instructional Specialist State Culture & Climate Specialist State Data Specialist State Human Capital Specialist State Intervention Specialist Project Manager Rigorous Selection Process Focus on identifying and hiring strong educational leaders to serve on RAC teams Example: Interview process for Literacy Specialists included: Teacher video observations Professional development presentation Interview questions Status of Hiring Interviews are ongoing for each of the positions RAC staff join this summer, in preparation to begin interventions in the fall Staffing the RACs

8 8 Priority Schools to identify staff who will support turnaround principles: Full-time A Literacy Leader will focus on improving literacy instruction A Mathematics Leader will focus on improving mathematics instruction Part-time A Climate and Culture Leader will focus on establishing a school environment with a climate conducive to learning and a culture of high expectations A Data Leader will collect and format data for ease of use by teachers and principals to improve teaching and learning as well as climate and culture Priority Schools will Hire or Appoint Content Leaders

9 Successful District and RAC Team Partnership 9 Superintendents – Set the tone for a partnership, confirm curriculum alignment, ensure effective Priority and Focus School staffing, share information with the BOE, staff, parents, communities, and students Business Administrators –Reserve appropriate funds for intervention strategies (e.g. Title I) Board of Education – Understand the role of the RACs with Priority and Focus Schools Title I Directors – Attend all Title I training sessions, incorporate School Improvement Plans (SIPs) with the Title I district plan Priority & Focus School Principals – Collaborate with RACs to develop effective SIPs, ensure effective staffing, confirm that an aligned curriculum is in place, prepare staff for implementing and monitoring intervention strategies

10 Accountability for Results….from Everyone Student success does not happen by accident. Everyone in the district and school needs to understand their role and how they contribute to student growth and achievement. Great teams and great leaders rely on feedback and systems of shared accountability for success. We don't measure the success of our football teams by the number of passes the quarterback completes or how many extra points the kicker makes, but rather by the score the entire team compiles. Sacks, passes caught, and more statistics are tracked, studied, and analyzed each week to drive improvement in football. Why not off the field and inside school walls? It is critical that all district staff - not just teachers and principals - know how their actions can powerfully impact student learning. We need to talk more about the entire team in education and the RACs will help us do just that. 10

11 RAC Approach 11 Student Performance DescriptionBaseline evaluation of schools on indicators based upon the 8 turnaround principles; replaces CAPA Collaborative plan created by schools, districts, and the RAC staff for specific intervention activities against all QSR indicators Clearly defined metrics to measure implementation progress and initial student outcomes on the SIP intervention activities Student performance on 6- week formative assessments (Priority Schools and select Focus Schools); student performance on NJASK and HSPA Turnaround Principle: Quality of Instruction QSR indicator: Teachers use quality and frequent checks for understanding during and at end of each lesson. Evidence of need: Less than 50% of teachers observed used high quality checks for understanding Illustrative example Major element Quality School Review (QSR) School Improvement Plan (SIP) School Accountability Management 1234 TimingSpring and fall 2012Aug – Oct 2012Sept 2012 – OngoingOngoing SIP intervention activities on indicator: Targeted PD for teachers on high quality checks for understanding (e.g., wait time) 50-day review 95% attendance at targeted PD session 50 – 70% of teachers observed used high quality checks for understanding 100-day review 70 – 90% of teachers observed used high quality checks for understanding Formative assessments: 18 week assessment: 10 point increase from baseline in reading and math NJASK: 45% proficiency (4 point increase) in both math and reading in year 1

12 12 Principals, School Leaders, and RAC staff will be held accountable for implementing their School Improvement Plan with high fidelity and improving student achievement Illustrative dashboard: Implementation metrics: Turnaround principle Intervention strategy (SIP) Implementation progress & quality > 80% of milestones met at high quality > 50%, but <80% of milestones met < 50% of milestones met 1.School Leadership 2.Climate & Culture 3.Effective Instruction 4.Curriculum, Assessment, Intervention 5.Effective Staffing Practices 6.Enabling the Effective Use of Data 7.Effective Use of Time 8.Effective Family & Community Engagement Indicator Form assess. Math ELA Attendance Student Teacher Discipline Suspended Expelled Surveys Teacher Parent / student NJASK/ HSPA Math ELA Goal met or exceeded Growth observed but goal not met No growth & goal not met ActualGoalResult School Progress Report will be completed every 6-8 weeks and will include the following metrics: – Implementation progress & quality – Formative assessment results – Attendance results – Discipline results – Survey & focus group results Both the Principal and the State Turnaround Coach will use the data dashboard to identify issues and opportunities throughout the year (1.6)Standards-based curriculum and aligned assessments is implemented Implement CCSS-aligned model curriculum and assessments across school. Outcome metrics: Week 6 Progress (2.1) The school community supports a safe, orderly and equitable learning environment. Develop a school-wide classroom management system focused on improving school climate. Identify barriers to class attendance and develop strategies to address them. (3.5) Teachers demonstrate use of diagnostic, summative, and formative assessment data to differentiate instruction Provide training for teachers on the analysis & use of data to select & plan instructional strategies, & to determine students strengths and weaknesses. (4.5) An intervention plan designed to meet the learning needs of students who are two or more years behind… Develop and execute a plan that includes clear at risk metrics to monitor school-wide and a detailed process of remediation and intervention activities for those students (5.5) Staff assignment is intentional to maximize the opportunities for all students to have access to the staff's instructional strengths. Identify teacher leaders to involve in improving achievement (6.3) Specific schedule and process for the analysis of formative assessment data that includes goals strategies, monitoring and evaluation. Develop the school-wide process and owner of analyzing, evaluating, and developing strategies and goals based on formative assessment data. This process should occur on a consistent 6-8 week basis (7.3) The master schedule is structured and designed to meet the professional development needs of staff. Provide common planning time for teachers of same grade levels or content areas. (8.1) Families are engaged in academically related activities, school decision-making, and an open exchange of information on student progress Provide workshops for parents to enhance student preparation for learning and increase parent involvement in the instructional program. Establish a system of communicating with community stakeholders on a routine basis School Accountability Management System

13 13 Curriculum Updates

14 The Quiet Revolution & Model Curriculum Common Core State Standards Fewer, clearer, more rigorous Internationally benchmarked Commonness Leverage state and nation-wide expertise (46 States and DC) PARCC (23 States and DC) Continuous improvement Model 1.0 followed by Model 2.0 Professional Development (content & grade specific) 14

15 Clearer … The CCSS Difference: Grade 7 ELA Before: NJCCCS (2004) 1. Produce written work and oral work that demonstrate comprehension of informational materials. After: CCSS (2010) 2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

16 Before: NJCCCS (2004) 1.Understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem. After: CCSS (2010) 1.Explain a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse. 2.Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in real-world and mathematical problems in two and three dimensions. 3.Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find the distance between two points in a coordinate system. The CCSS Difference: Grade 8 Math

17 Model Curriculum 1.0 Version 1.0Version 2.0 Version 1.0 WHAT Students need to Learn HOW We can best Instruct WHEN do we know students have Learned Standard Student Learning Objectives Instruction Formative Assessments Summative/Formative CCSS Standard 1 SLO #1 SLO #2 Model Lessons Model Tasks Engaging Instructional Strategies Effective checks for understanding Teacher designed formative assessments Unit Assessment SLOs 1-5 CCSS Standard 2 SLO #3 SLO #4 SLO #5 General Bank of Assessment Items 2.0 Student level learning reports - Professional development - Resource reviews

18 Common Core State Standards are critical, but just the first step Common Assessments aligned to the Common Core will help ensure the new standards truly reach every classroom Quality Implementation is required for students to reap the benefits of new standards 18 Common Standards Require Common Assessments

19 PARCC Assessment Design English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics, Grades 3-11 End-of-Year Assessment Innovative, computer- based items Required Performance-Based Assessment (PBA) Extended tasks Applications of concepts and skills Required Diagnostic Assessment Early indicator of student knowledge and skills to inform instruction, supports, and PD Non-summative Speaking and Listening Assessment Locally scored Non-summative, required 2 Optional Assessments/Flexible Administration Mid-Year Assessment Performance-based Emphasis on hard- to-measure standards Potentially summative 19

20 20 Assessment Transition Timeline Spring 2012 NJ ASK Aligned to NJCCCS Spring 2013 NJ ASK Aligned to the CCSS Spring 2014 NJ ASK Aligned to the CCSS SY Full administration of PARCC assessments Transitional Assessments

21 Timeline Through First PARCC Administration in PARCC Tools & Resources College-ready tools released Partnership Resource Center launched Professional development modules released Diagnostic assessments released Pilot/field testing begins Expanded field testing of diagnostic assessment Optional Diagnostic and Midyear PARCC Assessments Spring 2013 Summer 2013 Winter 2014 Spring 2014 Summer 2014 Fall 2013 Fall 2014 PARCC Assessment Implementation 21 Expanded field testing Model Instructional Units Released K-2 Formative Tools Released Winter 2015 Spring 2015 Summative PARCC Assessments Standard Setting in Summer 2015

22 22 RAC / County Office Partnership

23 23 County Office Functions County offices will continue their normal functions and supports in districts QSAC reviews Review & approval of district budgets Administrator contract reviews Resolution of disputes (HIB)

24 24 County Office Partnership with RACs County offices will inform and include Executive Directors of Regional Achievement Centers of all work being done in Priority and Focus Schools.

25 25 County Office Communications County Superintendents will be in regular contact with Executive Directors of Regional Achievement Centers to ensure an on-going exchange of information allowing both offices to fully service schools and districts effectively.

26 26 RAC / Title I Partnership

27 Title I and RAC Goals: A Shared Commitment Three takeaways: School Improvement Plan (SIP) will take the place of the Title I Schoolwide Plans for Priority and Focus Schools Funding Release of Title I allocation notices 30% Title I intervention reserve RAC Assurances 27

28 28 LEAs sign required assurances in August Accountability Process Overview 12 Individualized School Improvement Plans (SIPs) are developed in partnership with LEAs and P&F Schools 3 NJDOE approves School Improvement Plans at the end of October LEAs submit RAC required assurances to RACs NJDOE provides preliminary approval of Title I District Plan LEAs that do not sign assurances do not receive Title I funds LEAs hold funds in reserve for Priority and Focus School interventions School Improvement Plans are finalized by LEA, school leaders, and RACs Title I schoolwide Priority and Focus Schools receive an extension in submitting schoolwide plans Priority and Focus Schools submit a single School Improvement Plan via EWEG in late October (this incorporates Title I schoolwide plans) NJDOE provides final approval of Title I District Plan Funds in Priority and Focus interventions reserve are available for use Title I districts Non Title I districts LEAs submit required assurances form to Executive Director for Regional Achievement NJDOE initiates action against LEAs that do not sign assurances School Improvement Plans are finalized by RACs, LEA, and school leader School Improvement Plans are submitted to NJDOE in late October NJDOE approves School Improvement Plans

29 29 Title I Interventions Reserve Districts will sign a RAC assurance and set aside funds in a Priority and Focus Intervention reserve Reserve will be 30% of Title I funds All other Title I funds will be available for use by district Title I funds may be used for Embedded literacy, math, data, and climate and culture leaders Literacy and math interventions for students two or more years behind Technology upgrades to support Common Core and formative assessment implementation

30 30 Summary of Required RAC Assurances Title I districtsNon Title I districts Commitment to individualized School Improvement Plans (which will be finalized in late October) Sufficient operational flexibility (such as staffing, calendars/time, and budgeting) provided to Focus Schools Title I 30% Priority and Focus intervention reserve Priority Schools only: Qualified turnaround principal Common Core aligned curriculum School leaders in math, literacy, data, climate and culture Commitment to individualized School Improvement Plans (which will be finalized in late October) Sufficient operational flexibility (such as staffing, calendars/time, and budgeting) provided to Focus Schools

31 31 Title I Key Dates Mid-July: Title I districts scheduled to receive allocation notices (tentative) Title I Districts with P&F Schools must reserve 30% of funds for RAC interventions Mid-July: FY 2013 NCLB Consolidated Subgrant application scheduled for release on the Office of Grants Management Web Page July 17: Title I Directors workshop July 18: Title I Directors workshop July 24: Title I Directors Workshop October 31: School Improvement Plans submitted to RACs FY 2013 NCLB Consolidated Subgrant application due (tentative)

32 32 RAC Executive Directors for Regional Achievement

33 Introductions of EDs with us today: Gayle Griffin Mario Barbiere Scott Rixford Overview of the ED role: Master educators highly knowledgeable about the eight turnaround principles Experienced at working closely with district leaders Leadership of the RACs Management of the RAC teams in the schools 33 Executive Directors for Regional Achievement

34 34 Regional Achievement Center Mission & Guiding Principles RAC Mission Statement: New Jerseys Regional Achievement Centers, struggling schools, and their districts will partner to set clear goals for student growth, put proven turnaround principles into action, and use data to drive decision-making and accountability. Working together, we will meet our shared goal of closing the achievement gap and preparing all of our students for success in college and career. RAC Guiding Principles: Partnership: Regional Achievement Centers, Priority and Focus Schools, and their districts work together. Research base: School turnaround principles proven to drive student achievement are put into action. Support: High impact professional development is regularly provided to teachers, leaders, and Regional Achievement Center teams. Resources are targeted to support Priority and Focus Schools. Accountability: RAC teams, Priority and Focus Schools, and their districts are held directly accountable for results.

35 RAC Turnaround Principles Identify schools Assess needs Quality School Review (QSR) and School Improvement Plan Implement targeted interventions aligned to proven turnaround principles 35 8 Turnaround Principles 1.School Climate and Culture: A climate conducive to learning and a culture of high expectations 2.School Leadership: The principal has the ability to lead the turnaround effort 3.Standards Aligned Curriculum, Assessment and Intervention System: Teachers have the foundational documents and instructional materials needed to teach to the rigorous college and career ready standards that have been adopted 4.Instruction: Teachers utilize research-based effective instruction to meet the needs of all students 5.Use of Time: Time is designed to better meet student needs and increase teacher collaboration focused on improving teaching and learning 6.Use of Data: School-wide use of data focused on improving teaching and learning, as well as climate and culture 7.Staffing Practices: The skills to better recruit, retain and develop effective teachers and school leaders 8.Family and Community Engagement: Increased academically focused family and community engagement

36 RAC support model: field-based teams partner with Priority and Focus Schools School Improvement Director Executive Director for Regional Achievement (7) Chief Academic Officer Penny MacCormack RAC Staff Team (# varies by region) State Turnaround Coaches State Elementary Literacy Specialist State Secondary Literacy Specialist State Mathematics Specialist State Instructional Specialist State English Learners Specialist State Culture & Climate Specialist State Data Specialist State Human Capital Specialist State Intervention/Special Ed Specialist Project Manager Executive Directors for Regional Achievement lead RAC teams and work directly with LEA leadership State Turnaround Coaches work directly with principals and ensure interventions are coordinated & cohesive Content-area specialists partner with school leaders (e.g., data leader) and staff to build capacity in specific turnaround areas Project Managers monitor the progress and success of RAC interventions 36

37 37 RAC Focus: Capacity Building, Sustainability, Shared Accountability RAC staff are equally accountable for Priority and Focus School success Seven-week cycle is used to report on P&F School progress against goals Priority Schools that fail to implement the required interventions or fail to demonstrate required improvement in student academic achievement may become subject to state-ordered closure or other action Shared Accountability RAC teams spend 90% of time in Priority and Focus Schools Priority Schools will hire or identify leaders in math, literacy, data, and climate and culture RAC teams partner with school leaders to build school-level capacity in Priority and Focus Schools Capacity building RACs work with P&F Schools to align Title I and/or district funds with School Improvement Plans Priority Schools receive RAC support for three years at a minimum Focus Schools receive RAC support for two years at a minimum Sustainability

38 38 Key Dates for Districts

39 39 Week of: 4/2 RAC account launch 4/11 LEA Superintendents notified of Priority, Focus or Reward status schools RAC website launched 4/16 RAC information webinar held for P&F district Superintendents 4/23 Communication support tools for staff & families shared with P&F superintendents Planning survey sent to LEAs 4/30 LEA Principal appeals due (5/2) LEA planning survey due (5/4) 5/7 RAC presentation for staff and Boards of Education posted on RAC website 5/14 Decisions on staffing appeals from DOE to districts 5/21 5/286/4 Title I technical assistance workshop for schoolwide program planning (6/5) 6/11 Curriculum alignment requests sent to P&F schools Invitation to Regional RAC field meetings sent to P&F Sups, BAs, Title I Dir., and P&F Principals 6/18 FAQs and calendar ed to P&F superintendents CCSS aligned curriculum approval forms due to by 6/25 All model curriculum unit SLOs complete and available on website at nj.gov/education/modelcurriculum/ RAC Executive Directors (EDs) meet with P&F leaders 7/27/9 Title I districts tentatively scheduled to receive allocation notices Title I districts with P&F Schools reserve funds for interventions 7/16 Title I Directors workshop on 7/17 Title I Directors workshop on 7/18 FY 2013 NCLB Consolidated Subgrant application scheduled to be released 7/23 Title I Directors Workshop on 7/24 7/308/6 SIG schools leadership training scheduled for August /13 Model curriculum assessment 1 available on website at education/modelcurriculum/ District and school leader training with RACs (8/13 - 8/15) Priority School requirement; Focus School strongly recommended RAC staff and P&F Schools begin development of School Improvement Plans (SIPs) 8/208/27 P&F LEAs submit required RAC assurances FY 2013 NCLB Consolidated Subgrant application tentatively due 9/3 First week of school Official RAC launch 9/10 Modified QSRs for Priority Schools 9/179/2410/210/8 10/1510/22 School Improvement Plans (SIPs) finalized with RACs 10/29 All SIPS submitted School Progress Report #1 11/5 Regional Achievement Centers / District Partnership Timeline

40 40 Expectations and importance of district support: Our joint philosophy Break-out sessions where we can answer your individual questions Partnership Role of the EDs

41 Breakout Sessions 41


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