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Student Growth Objectives Setting SGOs and Developing High Quality Assessments 2013-14.

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Presentation on theme: "Student Growth Objectives Setting SGOs and Developing High Quality Assessments 2013-14."— Presentation transcript:

1 Student Growth Objectives Setting SGOs and Developing High Quality Assessments

2 Objectives for Today Explain how SGOs can be an effective measure of student learning Analyze the components of a well-formulated SGO Determine the assessments that would be appropriate for SGOs Evaluate the quality of pre-existing assessments Develop a series of next steps to take back to your districts

3 Norms for Today Be mindful of your normal speaking patterns Remain engaged in the process Assume good faith

4 Determining Starting Points
In your table groups do the following: Briefly introduce yourselves to each other. Discuss the hopes and fears you have about SGOs. Each team write one hope and one fear - 5 word limit for each. Share your hopes and fears with the larger group.

5 Determining Starting Points
One Hope One Fear

6 Shrinking the Change

7 Teacher Checklist Individually, check the items that effective teachers do in your school. Teach a curriculum that is aligned to standards. Determine the needs of students using several methods including a variety of assessments. Differentiate instruction based on the needs of students. Set goals for students appropriate to their grade, subject, and readiness level. Use high quality assessments to measure student performance. Work in collaborative groups to improve student achievement. Workshop packet pg. 4

8 In Requiring Teachers to Develop SGOs, What Are We Asking Them To Do?
Teach a curriculum that is aligned to standards. Determine the needs of students using several methods including a variety of assessments. Differentiate instruction based on the needs of students. Set goals for students appropriate to their grade, subject, and readiness level. Use high quality assessments to measure student performance. Work in collaborative groups to improve student achievement. Formalize and document the process, and be recognized for doing these things well. Workshop packet pg. 4

9 8. State regulations require all of the following for SGOs EXCEPT:
a) They must be specific and measurable b) They must measure learning between two points in time c) They must be aligned to standards d) They must be perfect This slide and those similar to it refer to the questions on the pre-survey. This survey can be modified and given to your staff as you see fit and the results used to adjust the workshop. Alternatively, you may delete this slide and the others that refer to the survey for a workshop tailored to your district’s needs. The survey can be found here - https://docs.google.com/forms/d/12ollezfuVN0Vm58BkTe9j2V8vosIgPpoJtg3JvPGm9k/viewform Survey - Question 8

10 What is an SGO? A Student Growth Objective is a long-term academic goal that teachers set for groups of students and must be: Specific and measureable Aligned to New Jersey’s curriculum standards Based on available prior student learning data A measure of student learning between two points in time SGO Guidebook pg. 3

11 What Constitutes “Growth” In Student Growth Objectives
For the purposes of SGOs, the Department is defining “growth” as an increase in learning between two points in time, such as that indicated by: Acquisition of knowledge or skill from a particular starting point or readiness level. Development of a portfolio indicating a change in skill or knowledge over a period of time. Difference in learning on pre- and post-tests. Psychometricians use the term growth in a very specific way and develop assessments with valid and reliable constructs to measure it. Unless the teacher has access to such a set of assessments, technically, they cannot measure “growth” of the their students. However, using the term growth more loosely is appropriate for the purposes of SGOs, and can include any of the above examples, e.g. target score of 80% based on rigor of assessment and readiness level of students, improvement by 3 reading levels on DRA test, increase on post test by 50% compared to pre-test, increase in score by one level on a portfolio rubric in at least 70% of elements.

12 1. For what percentage does the SGO rating count towards a teacher’s evaluation?
b) 15 c) 20 d) 15 for teachers in non-tested grades and subjects and 20 for teachers with an SGP Survey - Question 1

13 SGOs and AchieveNJ Survey - Question 1

14 2. How many SGOs must a teacher set for evaluation?
a) All set only 1 b) All set only 2 c) All set between 1 and 2, depending on district discretion d) 1 or 2 for teachers with SGPs, 2 for teachers in non-tested grades and subjects Survey - Question 2

15 SGOs in AchieveNJ - Requirements
All teachers who receive an SGP score must set between 1 and 2 SGOs. Teachers who do not receive an SGP score must set 2 SGOs. A teacher develops SGOs in consultation with his or her principal. SGOs must be aligned to NJCCCS or CCSS and measure student achievement and/or growth between two points in time. SGOs must be specific and measurable and based on students’ prior learning data when available. A teachers final SGO rating is determined by the principal. SGO Guidebook pg. 5 Survey - Questions 2, 4

16 SGOs in AchieveNJ - Recommendations
The remainder of this workshop provides recommendations and useful guidance on how to go about making the SGO process valuable for educators and students.

17 Attributes of SGOs and SGO Development
Teacher-created Tailored Collaborative Process-based Flexible

18 Distinguish Between General and Specific SGOs
Working in your district groups, and using the examples provided, determine the attributes that distinguish a general SGO from a specific SGO. Share your answers with your table group. SGO Guidebook pg. 5-7 Workshop packet pg. 5

19 General or Specific SGOs
Example 2: A music teacher teaches two sections of orchestra, two sections of guitar, and one of strings. He sets one of his SGOs for orchestra, and one for guitar, thereby including the majority of his students. His assessments are portfolio-based and include components from each of the four visual and performing arts standards.  Example 3: A kindergarten teacher has 14 students and uses a locally-developed portfolio to assess her students. She sets one of her SGOs for all of her students based on their growth as measured by 5 out of 7 domains in the portfolio.

20 General or Specific SGOs
Example 1: A 4th-grade elementary team focuses an SGO on science. In consultation with the middle school science teacher, the team develops a portfolio assessment that requires the students to demonstrate the critical standards-based skill of scientific thinking and practice. Each teacher sets an SGO for her individual class based on the starting point of her students. Students build a science portfolio throughout the year. At the end of the year, the team sits together to collaboratively grade the portfolios using a rubric.

21 General or Specific SGOs
SGOs can be classified as “general” or “specific.” However, in some cases, the line between these is blurry. It is better to think of general and specific SGOs being on a continuum. General Specific Broad Includes a significant proportion of the curriculum and key standards for a given course Includes all, or a significant number, of a teacher’s students Focused Includes a particular subgroup of a teacher’s students, and/or Includes specific content or skill

22 General or Specific SGOs
General Specific A 10th-grade social studies teacher has five sections of US History 1 and has 102 students. His general SGO includes all 102 students, and incorporates a significant proportion of content standards and skills he will teach between October 15 and May 1, the week before the department-wide assessment. A 10th-grade social studies teacher finds on the free response portion of the pre-assessment many students were unable to clearly use evidence to support their points of view. He sets one of his SGOs to deal with this particular skill.

23 3. When should SGOs be set? a) Annually, before the beginning of the school year b) Annually, during the first few weeks of the school year c) Annually, at some point during the year at the teacher’s discretion d) Once, at the beginning of the school year to be used over the next few years Survey - Question 3

24 The SGO Process Consult with evaluator to approve SGOs
Teachers Recommended Official SGO process Consult with evaluator to approve SGOs Consult with evaluator to discuss SGO rating Step 1: Choose an assessment Step 4: Track progress, refine instruction September By Nov. 15* By Feb By end of school year Important Point SGOs can only be set in the first few weeks of the school year once baseline data has been collected. BUT preparatory work can be done before then in terms of assessments and the outline of what your SGO might look like. Step 2: Determine students’ starting points Step 3: Set SGO Adjustments made to SGOs with approval Step 5: Review results and score *For 2013–14 only. In subsequent years, SGOs must be set by Oct. 15. Survey - Question 3

25 SGOs Require a Teacher to
SGOs and SMART goals Typical Usage of SMART SGOs Must Be SGOs Require a Teacher to S Specific Describe how many students learn “what” or grow by “how much” M Measurable Compare starting points to ending points using assessments of some type A Achievable Ambitious but Achievable Determine a reasonable amount of growth according to knowledge of students R Relevant Align SGOs to standards T Time-related Set an appropriate instructional period Workshop packet pg. 6

26 Grade: Subject Number of Students Interval of Instruction Full year Semester Other ________ Name of Assessment SGO Type General Specific Rationale for Student Growth Objective (Please include content standards covered and explanation of assessment method.) Student Growth Objective Baseline Data (Please include what you know about your students’ performance/skills/achievement levels at the beginning of the year, as well as any additional student data or background information used in setting your objective.) Scoring Plan Objective Attainment Based on Percent and Number of Students Achieving Target Score Target Score Exceptional (4) Full (3) Partial (2) Insufficient (1)

27 SGO Guidebook pg.17 Workshop packet pg. 7 Grade: Subject
Number of Students Interval of Instruction 9 Physics 1 65 Full year Semester Other ________ Name of Assessment Department-developed Physics 1 assessment SGO Type General Specific Rationale for Student Growth Objective (Please include content standards covered and explanation of assessment method.) This SGO covers all of my students, all of the physical science standards that are part of NJ standards related to physics and many appropriate science practice standards: NJCCCS physical science D-E NJCCCS science practices A-D (as appropriate) Physics 1 assessment – Written: 60 multiple choice (4 choice), 5 short response questions, Practical: students design a simple apparatus, take measurements and collect data. Student Growth Objective At least 70% (45/65) of my students will attain a score of 80% or above on the end of course test. Baseline Data (Please include what you know about your students’ performance/skills/achievement levels at the beginning of the year, as well as any additional student data or background information used in setting your objective.) Grade 8 math scores, grade 8 science scores, scores on department-developed Physics 1 pre-assessment. A summary of this data is attached. Average score on the physics pre-assessment was 52%. SGO Guidebook pg.17 Workshop packet pg. 7

28 How SMART is your SGO? In your district teams, study the SGO provided.
Using the SMART framework, annotate this SGO to identify which components align with a S-M-A-R-T goal. Share your findings with the group.

29 How SMART is your SGO? Separate handout

30 A Tiered SGO Baseline Data and Preparedness Groupings (Please include the number of students in each preparedness group. Summarize the information you used to produce these groupings. Provide any additional student data or background information used in setting your objective.) Based on the Physics 1 pre-assessment, students are grouped into 3 levels of preparedness. These groupings are also supported by prior year’s math scores. See attached. Low – 36 students scored 35-49% Medium – 21 students scored 50-66% High – 8 students scored 67-80% Student Growth Objective Preparedness Group (e.g. Low, Medium, High) Number of Students in Each Group (Total) Target Score on Post-Assessment (%) Number of Students Required for “Full Attainment” Low 36/65 70 25-30 Medium 21/65 80 15-18 High 8/65 90 6-7 SGO Guidebook pg. 19 Workshop packet pg. 8

31 Break

32 5 Steps of the SGO Process
Step 1 Choose or develop a quality assessment aligned to NJCCCS or CCSS. Step 2 Determine students’ starting points. Step 3 Set ambitious and achievable SGOs with the approval of the principal. Step 4 Track progress, refine instruction. Step 5 Review results and score in consultation with your principal/supervisor. Some detail on each of these steps can be found in the SGO Quick Start Guide SGO Guidebook pg. 8 Survey - Question 9

33 Step 1 – Choose or Develop a Quality Assessment 3 components
Assessment Scope Determine the instructional period, the appropriate standards, and the educational goals that will be captured by the assessment. Assessment Quality Choose or develop an assessment, analyze for quality, and modify as necessary. Collection of Evidence Ensure that scoring and administration of school-based assessments relies on valid, reliable, and practical systems. SGO Guidebook pg. 10

34 Assessment Scope Planning
Determine the instructional period, the appropriate standards, and the educational goals that will be captured by the assessment. In your district teams, complete the planning guide. Make note of the questions that you were able to answer easily and those that provided more of a challenge. Share your findings with your table group. Workshop packet pg. 9

35 Assessment Scope Planning
So that data can be available for annual conferences, October to early May would be a good instructional window. However, June is fine as long as it gives administrators long enough to do the annual conferences. For teachers of semester courses, two options are open to them: 1) Set 2 SGOs for students in the first semester using baseline data collected at the beginning of the school year.  Teachers should begin teaching curriculum associated with this goal as soon as practical, perhaps by the end of September.  They should not have to wait until the November 15 deadline to begin this – this would produce a very short instructional window and not be a fair representation of the scope of the teacher’s work.  However, the November 15th deadline will give teachers and administrators a date by which any modifications to the SGO could be made based on the first couple of months of school.  By this date, the scoring plan should be set firmly and will be used to evaluate the teacher. 2) Set 1 SGO for the first semester and 1 for the second.  Follow the procedure in (1) for the first semester SGO.  For the second semester SGO, even though a rough outline of the SGO should be developed and the assessment chosen by November 15th, baseline data may not be available.  Therefore, teachers may not be able to confidently develop a scoring plan and finalize their SGOs until the beginning of the second semester.  The February 15th mid-year adjustment date provides an opportunity for teachers to make adjustments to the SGOs they officially set by the November 15th deadline.  These adjustments will be made using the baseline data they are able to collect at the beginning of the second semester course. Even though both options are allowed under the new evaluation system, the second option may provide a fairer and more accurate picture of an educator’s work.  It spans a whole year and more of the students for whom that teacher is responsible.  It is closer to the spirit of the SGO process that we would like to see districts aim for. Note – this form is not in the SGO guidebook but will be in the next version. Workshop packet pg. 9

36 Assessment Scope What do you want your students to KNOW?

37 Assessment Scope What do you want your students to DO?

38 Assessment Scope Critical Decisions About Critical Standards
In district teams, review the social studies standards provided. Which standards are foundational for success in this class and beyond? Which standards will lead to enduring understanding? Which of these standards will be taught during the SGO instructional period? Identify a group of standards that fit these criteria and write them on the Standards Alignment and Coverage form. Share your findings with your table group.

39 Assessment Scope Critical Standards
SGO Guidebook pg. 26 Workshop packet pg. 10

40 Assessment Quality Types of Assessments
Choose or develop an assessment, analyze for quality, and modify as necessary. 3 Options Purchase a new assessment or select an existing one Create a new assessment locally Modify an existing assessment

41 Assessment Quality Types of Assessments
Traditional Assessments Portfolio Assessments Performance Assessment District, school and departmental tests e.g., modified final exams, benchmark exams State and national exams (except the NJ ASK), e.g. NOCTI, AP Writing and reflection sample Laboratory research notebook Portfolio of work Project-based assessment Teaching Strategies Gold® Lab Practicum Sight reading in music Dramatic performance Skills demonstration Persuasive speaking DRA™2 Final exams can be modified for instructional window. AP type exams can be created for students using prior year’s questions so that data is available by the end of the year. SGO Guidebook pg.10

42 Assessment Quality Standards Alignment and Coverage
In district teams, refer to the social studies assessment provided. Using the Standards Alignment and Coverage Check form, make a note of the items in the assessment that are aligned to the standards you have identified. How would you judge the alignment? Use a scale of 1-10.

43 Assessment Quality Standards Alignment and Coverage
SGO Guidebook pg. 26 Workshop packet pg. 10

44 Assessment Quality Depth of Knowledge
4 minute video explaining DOK using the Gettysburg Address Workshop packet pg. 11

45 Assessment Quality Depth of Knowledge
How rigorous is your assessment? Choose several items from your assessment. Categorize them as level 1-4 on the Assessment Rigor and Depth of Knowledge Analysis form. Discuss what modifications of this assessment may be necessary.

46 Assessment Quality Depth of Knowledge
SGO Guidebook pg. 27 Workshop packet pg. 12

47 Assessment Quality Validity and Variety
SGO Guidebook pg. 28 Workshop packet pg. 13

48 Collection of Evidence
Ensure that scoring and administration of school-based assessments relies on valid, reliable, and practical systems.

49 Collection of Evidence Quality Rubrics
Strong rubrics ensure that a student’s knowledge of a subject or skill is accurately assessed. Identify the knowledge and skills being measured Differentiate between high and low achievement Clearly identify and describe levels of performance for each element Determine component weighting as necessary Create and share with colleagues to ensure rigor and alignment to common expectations

50 Collection of Evidence Quality Rubrics
Grades 9-12 Common Core History and Social Studies Rubrics Key Ideas and Details RH  Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole. Needs Specific Improvement Approaching Meets Expectations Exceeds Lacks specific details from the text Does not connect details to the text as a whole. Contains some specific details from the text but omits the most important ones Attempts to connect details to the text as a whole. Cites specific evidence to support the analysis of the text-Connects insights from specific details to the text as a whole. Meets expectations and performs one of the following: Brings in outside information from prior knowledge/other sources Demonstrates a connection between the historical context of the document and the modern day. Differentiate between high and low achievement Identify the knowledge and skills being measured Clearly identify and describe levels of performance for each element

51 Collection of Evidence Administration and Scoring of Assessments
What are the most valid, reliable, and practical ways to administer and score school-based assessments in your district? In your district team discuss the following: Will assessments be administered in one sitting or several? Should the students’ teacher be the one administering the assessment? Who should score the assessments? Would professional development in scoring or other aspects of assessment be useful in your district? Open up the discussion at the table and share your ideas.

52 5 Steps of the SGO Process
Step 1 Choose or develop a quality assessment aligned to NJCCCS or CCSS. Step 2 Determine students’ starting points. Step 3 Set ambitious and achievable SGOs with the approval of the principal. Step 4 Track progress, refine instruction. Step 5 Review results and score in consultation with your principal/supervisor.

53 7. Which of the following data sources can be used to determine students’ starting points? Check all that apply. A rigorous and carefully constructed pre-assessment Grades from the student’s prior year classes relevant to the current class Test scores from the prior year in relevant classes Grades from the current year Survey - Question 7

54 Step 2 – Determine Students’ Starting Points Examples
Source of Performance Data to Determine Students’ Starting Points Examples and Notes Grades/performance in current year Based on all aspects of work during the first few weeks of school Beginning-of-course diagnostic tests or performance tasks Department-generated pre-assessment Early course test Prior-year test results that assess knowledge and skills that are pre-requisites to the current subject/grade NJASK for math, LAL and science DRA for reading End of course assessments Test results in other relevant subjects from prior years A physics teacher uses results of her students’ math tests from last year Students’ grades in previous classes Teachers should make sure they understand the basis for the grades given by students’ previous teachers Survey - Question 7

55 Step 2 – Determine Students’ Starting Points Multiple Sources of Data
A 9th-grade LAL teacher has two sets of data readily available: a department-wide pre-assessment that is based on the content and structure of the final assessment and scores on the portfolio that the students completed the previous year. Student Portfolio Score (June 2013) Pre-Assessment (Sep 2013) Preparedness Group 1 89 76 High 2 68 43 Low 3 78 54 Medium 4 86 66

56 5 Steps of the SGO Process
Step 1 Choose or develop a quality assessment aligned to NJCCCS or CCSS. Step 2 Determine students’ starting points. Step 3 Set ambitious and achievable SGOs with the approval of the principal. Step 4 Track progress, refine instruction. Step 5 Review results and score in consultation with your principal/supervisor.

57 Step 3 – Set Growth Objectives Scoring Rubric
Attainment of Student Growth Objective Exceptional 4 Full 3 Partial 2 Insufficient 1 Teacher has demonstrated an exceptional impact on learning by exceeding the objective. Teacher has demonstrated a considerable impact on learning by meeting the objective. Teacher has demonstrated some impact on learning but did not meet the objective. Teacher has demonstrated an insufficient impact on learning by falling far short of the objective.

58 Step 3 – Set Growth Objectives SGO Scoring Guide
Target Score Attainment Level in Meeting Student Growth Objective 80% or Higher on Final Assessment Exceptional 4 Full 3 Partial 2 Insufficient 1 Percent of Students Meeting Target Greater than 84% 70-84% 55-69% Less than 55%

59 Step 3 – Set Growth Objectives Tiered SGO Scoring Guide
Groups Target Score on Final Assessment Objective Attainment Based on Percent of Students Achieving Target Score Exceptional 4 Full 3 Partial 2 Insufficient 1 Low 70% At least 90% At least 80% At least 70% Less than 70% Medium 80% High 90% Workshop packet pg. 7

60 5 Steps of the SGO Process
Step 1 Choose or develop a quality assessment aligned to NJCCCS or CCSS. Step 2 Determine students’ starting points. Step 3 Set ambitious and achievable SGOs with the approval of the principal. Step 4 Track progress, refine instruction. Step 5 Review results and score in consultation with your principal/supervisor.

61 Step 4– Track Progress, Refine Instruction The Most Important Work

62 Your Next Steps Discuss with your district team some of the key lessons you have learned from today’s workshop. Agree to follow up with1-3 concrete next steps to facilitate the SGO development process in your school. Share with your table and the larger group when asked. Workshop packet pg. 1

63 Resources at the NJDOE AchieveNJ SGO Training modules - online in June
Future workshops – provisionally planned for September/October Updates, samples, and bulletins Partner with us on creating exemplar SGOs

64 Final Thoughts on SGOs Continue doing what is effective for your students Use or adapt assessments that you already use Support each other and share Don’t let perfection get in the way of the good


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