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The Journey Down the Road of Disproportionality and Cultural Responsiveness: LOUISIANA STYLE!! April 4, 2008 CEC International Conference Boston, Massachusetts.

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Presentation on theme: "The Journey Down the Road of Disproportionality and Cultural Responsiveness: LOUISIANA STYLE!! April 4, 2008 CEC International Conference Boston, Massachusetts."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Journey Down the Road of Disproportionality and Cultural Responsiveness: LOUISIANA STYLE!! April 4, 2008 CEC International Conference Boston, Massachusetts

2 Introduction of Presenters Dr. James Patton, Consultant College of William and Mary Debbie Morrison Director of Special Education Rapides Parish Daphne McGinnis Supervisor of Special Education Janice Moreau Gifted Program Coordinator

3 A Tale of Two Cities...Disproportionality and Stages of Organizational Reactions to Change INTRODUCTION The change agent must first determine if the organization promotes a climate or culture of change. The responsibility of leaders in organizations is to determine how to manage change when faced with an obvious need. Change-avoidance organizations will progress through several stages in a somewhat recognizable sequence before finally making the required change. Some stages may be more intense than others, or the sequence may vary somewhat. Some stages may be revisited more than once as the organization works through the need for change. Organizational reaction to change is usually closely akin to the way individuals within the organization react to change. Reactions to change are not limited only to the upper echelons of an organization -- these stages may be seen at all levels of the organization from mailroom to boardroom and every level in between. Given these organizational parameters, it has been my experience that school systems often respond to disproportionality as a change event, and in ways that can be predicted, given the manner in which individuals and organizations traditionally respond to change. Below one will find some stages of organizational response to change i.e., disproportionality. These stages represent an amalgam of stages that individuals go through in response to grief, determining that their child has a disability, and other significant change events, that generally parallel organizational responses to change.

4 Stage I – Denial/Resistance Oh No! It cant be! There must be some mistake! The individual refuses to accept that there is a need for change, or that a problem even exists. This is a way of protecting ones self and the organization from the shock of bad news and to keep the emotional pain at a distance. The length of time spent at this stage can vary, but with time and presentation of evidence, most people can move through this stage successfully. Change agents should expect this whenever the need for change is first openly addressed.

5 Stage II – Anger Why me? Its not fair! Who says? Emotional Intelligence literature notes that individuals are often emotionally attached to their organizations. As a result, the emotional response of the individual often mirrors the response of the organization. Fury, Bitterness and Betrayal form the emotional triad. This triad may be seen in organizations upon initial notification of bad news. Coming to understand the reality of a bad situation may stir up emotional turmoil that manifests itself as anger. This is a necessary part of the process and it relieves some of the emotional pressure. People in organizations dealing with change may see others as not being supportive of them, or not understanding the need for change. Those who would be organizational change agents should view this stage as a natural part of organizational progression, even though they may find themselves the unenviable targets of this anger. Harbingers of bad news often become the foil of the dont shoot the messenger axiom.

6 Im a failure. I cant do this. What did I do to cause this situation? What should I have done to avoid it? The realization that an outcome or resolution may not occur may bring on depression. It may appear in the form of diminished resolve or outright despair. There may be overwhelming feelings of hopelessness, frustration, bitterness or self-pity. Change agents will recognize this as a sign that the reality of the situation has set in, a needed step before truly corrective change can occur. Stage III – Shock/Depression/ Guilt/Anxiety

7 O.K, but dont reveal this problem to anyone or Whats the minimum I can do to address the problem? Well try to fix it, but I doubt it will work. Once they recognize there is a problem, there may be an effort to conceal it. Organizations may relegate the problems solution to an ineffective individual, thereby paying only lip-service to the effort. In this manner one can say they he/she is addressing a problem, albeit ineffectively. Sometimes, if the need for change is evident, individuals may try to strike bargains to avoid or minimize the impact of the problem. It is a form of emotional negotiation, designed to achieve some sense of control, or to effect an internal reconciliation. Change agents should recognize this stage as one of the most challenging to move beyond, since there may be merely the appearance of change, void of actual substance. Stage IV – Concealment/Resistance/ Confusion/Bargaining

8 O.K., I guess this is how it will be. Lets get on with it. This phase generally brings a degree of peace to a tumultuous process. The individual or organization has achieved an emotional rebalancing needed to move forward with life. There is a difference between acceptance and resignation or uneasy acceptance. There is a final recognition that change is something that is needed, not just tolerated. Additionally, organizations can respond maliciously as a reaction to change. This could be manifested by engaging in actions that are an exaggeration of the resolution to the problem. The organization may accept and make changes that may respond to the problem but do so in malicious ways. Stage V – Some Acceptance/Commitment/ Malicious Compliance

9 Stage VI Acceptance/Integration/ Reconstruction/Hope Change agents know that it is only after an individual or organization reaches this stage that meaningful change is possible. All of the previous five stages have been reconciled, mediated and integrated in ones personal and collective psyche. Real and authentic work takes place at this stage with hope and resolution replacing denial, resistance, anger, shock, concealment and malicious compliance.

10 The Journey of Os and Us- Louisiana Style The Journey of Over-representation and Under-representation in Rapides Parish

11 Rapides Parish School System 23, 749 students 3003 special education students 355 Gifted Students 52 schools Combination of urban, rural, and suburban

12 Map of Rapides Parish Rapides Parish

13 Special Education Department

14 The BIG Question…………. Where do we begin???

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16 Our Journey Begins……….. August 2005- Steering Committee established Regular Education Representation Special Education Representation Parent Representation- Families Helping Families Community Representation Ministers of Economic Development

17 Developing our GOALS……. Goal # 1 Creating an AWARENESS of the issue of disporportionality

18 Creating an Awareness Dr. James Patton Ed.D, Consultant October Visit-Began Awareness Campaign In-serviced steering committee,Central Office Staff, PAS Principals Meeting Working Lunch with School Board Members Conducted in-serviced in targeted schools Community Leadership Luncheons Parent/Community Forums

19 GOAL # 2 Appropriate Identification of Students with Disabilities Consultant- Dr. Bruce A. Bracken, Ph.D The College of William & Mary Promoting Equitable Assessment Training Conducted a Parent/Community Forum

20 Goal # 3 Identify TARGET SCHOOLS and implement early intervening services Special Education Instructional Facilitators SRA Direct Instruction Reading program implementation

21 Goal # 4 Behavior Support Consultant- Dr. Terry Scott University of Florida District-wide Awareness Training of Positive Behavior Support RPSB District GoalDistrict-wide implementation of PBS

22 Our Journey Continues….05-06 November, 2005 Steering Committee Meeting New Steering Committee Members Director of Child Welfare and Attendance Director of Elementary and Secondary Ed Title I Director Four Principals Director of Probation and Parole Judge-9 th Judicial Juvenile Court Black Ministerial Alliance Office of Mental Health La SIG Representation Families Helping Families

23 Our Journey Continues……05-06 December, 2005- Dr. Patton Returns Visits 7 Additional Schools and facilitates Steering Committee Meeting February 1-3, 2006-Dr. Patton Returns Conducts In-services in 4 schools Parish Leadership Luncheon Parent/Community Forum Mens Professional Fraternity Meeting

24 Our Journey Continues……06-07 September, 2006 Dr. Patton visits and work begins on the development of the Districts 5 Year Plan on Disproportionality November, 2006 Draft plan presented to Steering Committee/Revisions/More Input/Revisions… December, 2006 Presentation to the Superintendent and Rapides Parish School Board--Approved

25 Mr. Gary Jones, Superintendent –Rapides Parish I do not want a hollow plan.

26 Disproportionality Plan of Rapides Parish 2006-2011 Increase professional development activities on disproportionality and cultural responsive practices. Continue professional development activities with PAS and SBLC committees on pre- referral/referral processes Support and expand the Districts Early Childhood Intervention programming Reinforce and further actualize RTI and UDL initiatives in Rapides Parish Schools Fair, non-discriminatory classifications for special education that ensure LRE and support inclusive practices

27 Disproportionality Plan of Rapides Parish 2006-2011 Address related behavioral correlates of disproportionality through the use of PBS Increase reading skills in targeted schools through the use of DI Expand and improve existing collaborative family support and family involvement activities Expand the Districts Gifted and Talented Program from early elementary to high school Continue on-going development of collaborative relationships with community/business/ religious leaders

28 Disproportionality Plan of Rapides Parish 2006-2011 Develop an evaluation plan that will measure and monitor the strategic plan activities at the formative and summative levels Develop and implement a plan that will disseminate the Districts 5 year plan and strategic activities both inside and outside the Rapides Parish School District

29 But, what about the U s? Under-representation of Minority Students in Gifted Education Programs

30 How to address Under-representation The search for minority students The Enrichment Academy Expansion of the High School Gifted Program Development of a Gifted/Talented Advisory Board

31 Getting Started The Enrichment Academy Parent and Student Observation Checklist New matrix for identifying minority students

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33 Getting Started- The Enrichment Academy Parent and Student Observation Checklist New Matrix for identifying minority students Organized Steering Committee

34 Target Dates for The Enrichment Academy Develop sociogram- August IOWA Scores for 2 nd graders-August Identify students- End of August Parent Contract/Orientation- End of August Steering Committee Planning of Activities- September First Enrichment Academy Activity-October

35 Saturday Enrichment Academy

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37 Monthly Enrichment Activity Creative Animation

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40 Expansion of the High School Gifted Program Gathered data on eligible students Presentation to School Board Board approved 5 new high school gifted programs

41 Goals and Future Plans Summer Enrichment Academy-(May 26-June 4) Evaluation of students in Enrichment Academy- Fall 2008 Gifted and Talented Advisory Board Larger variety of courses for high school gifted students New elementary gifted programs Talented services Apply for grants for G/T programs

42 A look at some data……….

43 Action Plan Goals Increase professional development activities on disproportionality and cultural responsive practices.

44 Professional Development Opportunities for Every-Ed Number of Regular Ed Teachers Number of Special Ed Teachers Number of Workshops 27339530 41%59%

45 Action Plan Goals Continue professional development activities with Pupil Appraisal Staff and SBLC committees on pre-referral/referral processes

46 Reduction in Pre-Referrals for Special Education 2005-06 BlackAsianNative American WhiteHispanic 350112206 2006-07 279021713

47 Action Plan Goals Support and expand the Districts Early Childhood Intervention programming

48 Early Childhood Inclusive Practices 2005-2006 37%-Regular classes for 80% of the day 47%-Self Contained- separate class 2007-08 49%- Regular Classes for 80% of the day 20% -Self Contained separate classes

49 Action Plan Goals Reinforce and further actualize Response to Intervention (RTI) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) initiatives in Rapides Parish Schools

50 Results of RTI, PBS, and Disproportionality Efforts INITIAL EVALUATIONS 03/04 837 Initial Evaluations 04/05 793 Initial Evaluations 05/06 579 Initial Evaluations 06/07 471* Initial Evaluations

51 Action Plan Goals Fair, non-discriminatory classifications for special education that ensure LRE and support inclusive practices

52 Special Education Placements 2005-06 46.07%- Regular class- 80% of day in regular class 65.44%-Self Contained <40% of day in separate class 2007-08 44% - Regular class- 80% of day in regular class (673) 63% -Self Contained <40% of day in separate class (175)

53 Risk Ratios of Minority Students Risk RatioThe likelihood of a minority student being identified in a particular exceptionality category Mildly Mentally Handicapped Specific Learning Disability Emotional/Behavior Disordered

54 Trend Data on Risk Ratios Goal- Increase the risk ratio for Gifted Minority 2005-06 14% 2006-07 15%

55 Action Plan Goals Goal-Decrease the risk ratio for minority students in three exceptionalities: 2005-06 Mildly Mentally Handicapped - 3.52 Specific Learning Disability - 1.92 Emotional/Behavior Disordered – 2.83 2006-07 Mildly Mentally Handicapped - 3.25 Specific Learning Disability - 1.88 Emotional/Behavior Disordered 2.83

56 Action Plan Goals Address related behavioral correlates of disproportionality, i.e., suspensions and expulsions, drop outs, Positive Behavior Support Systems, etc.

57 Action Plan Goals Students with Disabilities Discipline Removals 2005-06 Out of School Expulsions- 42 Black students-93% White students-7% 2006-07 Out of School Expulsions- 6 Black Students-83% White students 17%

58 Action Plan Goals Drop Out Rates-Students with Disabilities 2005-06 - 27% 2006-07 - 29% Positive Behavior Support 2005-06- 12 schools trained 2006-07- 24 school trained Goal: April, 2008-All schools trained

59 Action Plan Goals Expand the Districts Gifted and Talented Program from early elementary to high school

60 Minority Students in Gifted Education School Year% Minority GT 2004-058.18 2005-068.98 2006-0710.13

61 Action Plan Goals Continue on-going development of collaborative relationships with formal and informal community leaders, business leaders, religious leaders, former consumers of special education

62 Community Involvement MacArthur Foundation Ninth Judicial Juvenile Court Black Ministerial Alliance Fraternities and Sororities Mental Health Agencies Family Helping Families Federation of Families

63 Action Plan Goals Develop an evaluation plan that will measure and monitor the strategic plan activities at the formative and summative levels

64 Capture website! http://www.rapides.k12.la.us/sped/tc_1/

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67 Action Plan Goals Develop and implement a plan that will disseminate the Districts 5 year plan and strategic activities both inside and outside the Rapides Parish School District

68 Action Plan Goals LEADS Conference New Orleans Summer 2006 NCCREST National Disproportionality Forum, Washington, DC February, 2007 Louisiana State Department of Education Special Education Directors Quarterly Meeting, May 2007 International Council for Exceptional Conference, Boston April 2008 C2 E2 Website

69 Passing the baton…….

70 TOTAL Involvement and Commitment Ministerial Alliance Fraternities and Sororities Community Agencies Parental Involvement Local Elected Officials Judicial System Representatives

71 Good Luck!!!! Dr. James Patton, Consultant jmpatt@wm.edu Debbie Morrison, Director morrisond@rapides.k12.la.us Daphne McGinnis, Secondary Supervisor mcginnisd@rapides.k12.la.us Janice Moreau, Gifted Program Coordinator moreauj@rapides.k12.la.us Copy of PowerPoint- http://www.rapides.k12.la.us/sped/tc_1/


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