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©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 1 Southern Illinois: Garden of the Gods Readiness Assessment Chapter 2: Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping December.

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Presentation on theme: "©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 1 Southern Illinois: Garden of the Gods Readiness Assessment Chapter 2: Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping December."— Presentation transcript:

1 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 1 Southern Illinois: Garden of the Gods Readiness Assessment Chapter 2: Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping December 28, 2007; revised Feb 15, 2008 CONNECT SI ViTAL Economy Alliance Frank Knott, Lead & Master Guru; Stan Halle, Senior Editor; Jim Haguewood, Rob Beynon, & Neil Gamroth, Principal Economic Researchers fknottmd@earthlink.net; http://www.vitaleconomy.com

2 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 2 2.01 Why We Map 2.02 Indigenous Resources & Industry Maps 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources Table of Contents EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW: the Big Picture & Importance of Change in Southern Illinois EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW: the Big Picture & Importance of Change in Southern Illinois READINESS ASSESSMENT (RA) READINESS ASSESSMENT (RA) 1. State, National & Global Trends 2. Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping 3. Enabling Environment Necessities 4. Climate of Innovation, Incubation & Entrepreneurship 5. Southern Illinois Competitiveness 6. Regional Perspectives 7. Framework for Success APPENDICES

3 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 3 Chapter 2: Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping 2.01 Why We Map …………………………………. 4 2.02 Indigenous Resources & Industry Maps …… 9 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources ……. 13 Southern Illinois "Garden of the Gods" SI has significant & unique assets that position it to take full advantage of the trends discussed in Chapter 1 this allows SIs economy to grow from within rather than spending precious resources on industry attraction … sow your own to grow your own

4 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 4 Chapter 2: Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping 2.01 Why We Map Southern Illinois "Garden of the Gods" Asset Mapping is an essential step in the ViTAL Economy Process providing key insights for a region to learn how to recognize and value what makes it unique.

5 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 5 Asset Mapping Why it is Essential Know where you are See where you have been Know where you are going Find the best route Find an alternate route Determine what to avoid Make connections Determine who to visit with Learn what makes us unique & that SI is something special Discover what previously competing communities within SI have in common Bring to light the Regions collaborative and marketable opportunities Discover our ability to compete without trying to become something we are not Note: We cannot effectively compete without collaborating & connecting assets across SI Do what you can, with what you have, where you are - Theodore Roosevelt Do what you can, with what you have, where you are - Theodore Roosevelt 2.01 Why We Map

6 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 6 Connect SI – Overall Logic Flow Asset Maps help us understand what makes SI unique! Opportunity Realized Measures of Success Short/Long Term Wins Connect the Dots Barriers Barrier Strategies Local Opportunity Local Innovation Global Innovation Industry/State Best Practices Innovation Who We Are Knowledge The foundation of sustainable economic growth is building on what makes a region unique, NOT copying what others are doing Global Opportunity 2.01 Why We Map

7 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 7 Weaving Assets into Opportunities Most large markets evolve from niche markets - Regis McKenna, Silicon Valley guru Most large markets evolve from niche markets - Regis McKenna, Silicon Valley guru In the ViTAL Economy approach, Indigenous Resources are interwoven with existing and emerging opportunities to form unique bonds Enhances connectivity amongst existing businesses to strengthen the competitive position of SI in a global economy instead of competing against each other Enables SI to leverage unique/remote assets that offer value- added rather than low-margin commodity products & services By weaving together SI COIs indigenous and sector resources, critical mass can be achieved and global opportunities captured Prior to linking these assets together, everyone had a piece of the value-chain, but few had the whole chain Once SI understands its collective strengths, it can then connect those strengths to global niche market opportunities, which have heretofore not been captured by SI 2.01 Why We Map

8 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 8 Asset Maps Focus Opportunity Analysis Enables SI to define how indigenous resources make it unique and special Identifies resources at economic sub-regions to be leveraged across counties Helps to filter, prioritize and focus competing economic strategies Defines what industry clusters can be home grown based on local assets Identifies industry value chain assets to be connected across SI Region Natural Human Knowledge Cultural Geographic Excellence Infrastructure Government Natural Human Knowledge Cultural Geographic Excellence Infrastructure Government Map Indigenous Assets + = Agriculture Healthcare Tourism Energy Manufacturing Education KBE Firms Logistics Agriculture Healthcare Tourism Energy Manufacturing Education KBE Firms Logistics Map Industry Assets Priority industry clusters with the best ability to deliver economic growth goals See: RA Chapter 2 2.01 Why We Map

9 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 9 Chapter 2: Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping 2.02 Indigenous Resources & Industry Maps Southern Illinois "Garden of the Gods" The four Regional Communities of Interest (COIs) Greater Egypt, Greater Wabash, Southeastern, and Southern Five produced extensive Asset Maps of both their Indigenous Resources and by major Industry (both existing & emerging); these are summarized here

10 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 10 Asset Mapping Was Done by Each COI Connect SI includes 4 Sub-regions: Southern Five Union, Johnson, Alexander, Pulaski, Massac Southeastern Pope, Hardin, Saline, Hamilton, Gallatin Greater Wabash White, Wayne, Edwards, Wabash Greater Egypt Randolph, Perry, Jackson, Jefferson, Franklin, Williamson Connect SI includes 4 Sub-regions: Southern Five Union, Johnson, Alexander, Pulaski, Massac Southeastern Pope, Hardin, Saline, Hamilton, Gallatin Greater Wabash White, Wayne, Edwards, Wabash Greater Egypt Randolph, Perry, Jackson, Jefferson, Franklin, Williamson GE SE GW S5 2.02 Indigenous Resources & Industry Maps

11 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 11 Asset Mapping: Indigenous Resources Source: COI Asset Mapping Teams 2.02 Indigenous Resources & Industry Maps Double-click on the table below to open the Excel spreadsheets that detail SI Indigenous Resources from the Milestone 2 Asset Mapping Process these maps will provide an important foundation for all Industry Cluster efforts (Phase 2) Use the scroll bars to view additional rows & columns Additional opportunities and resources may be added to the map as regional stakeholders use it as a dynamic tool to map the assets of your evolving economy Indigenous Resources: Natural; Human; Knowledge; Cultural; Geographic; Excellence; Infrastructure; Government

12 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 12 Asset Mapping: By Industry Industries: Agriculture; KBE; Energy; Education; Tourism; Logistics, Transportation, and Distribution; Forest Products; Manufacturing Source: COI Asset Mapping Teams 2.02 Indigenous Resources & Industry Maps Double-click on the table below to open the Excel Spreadsheets that inventory SI resources by industry during the Milestone 2 Asset Mapping Process these maps will provide an important foundation for specific Industry Cluster efforts (Phase 2); use the scroll bars to view additional rows & columns Additional opportunities and resources may be added to these maps as regional stakeholders use it as a dynamic tool to map the assets of your evolving economy

13 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 13 Chapter 2: Indigenous Resources & Industry Asset Mapping 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources Southern Illinois "Garden of the Gods" Chapter 2s Summary Section takes some of the most promising Opportunities identified in Chapter 1 and couples these with the most unique and leveragable SI Assets; however, there are barriers that must be overcome (aka Challenges) these will be discussed more thoroughly in Chapters 3, 4, 5 and 6

14 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 14 What COIs Learned from Asset Maps SIUs 60+ year history with students from over 100 cultures positions SI to access expanding global markets which are seeking access to U.S. markets SIUs research centers of excellence in energy, environment, materials and neuroscience perfectly align with global priorities for market growth SI has a more significant base of workforce development and research university assets to respond to the 10 million worker shortage than any rural economy in the U.S. There are more innovation, incubation and entrepreneur assets in SI than anyone imagined; this positions SI to build an Innovation Ecosystem fueling KBE growth Intermodal logistics assets and heartland location align with the redevelopment and expansion of inland waterway logistics connecting to Midwest logistic gateways Regional tourism assets are aligned with authentic and active lifestyle tourism trends involving 50-80 million annual tourists in the U.S. SI has the right mix of assets for attracting the financially independent active retirement demographic, which is fueling the growth of senior living opportunities SI has a significant base of diversified alternative and traditional energy assets, which if collaboratively organized, provide a basis for a diversified energy sector Asset Mapping proves SI already has what it needs to drive its own economic destiny 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources

15 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 15 OpportunitiesLinks to Regional AssetsChallenges Globalization: The World is Flat World economic growth rate = 4Xs the rate of SI SI can leverage its central location and inter-model transportation assets to become a logistics service center Proximity: 8 hour drive time to over 2/3 U.S. market I-57, Rt12, I-24, I-13, CN Rail, Ohio and Mississippi waterways SIDEZ, USDA and others conducting logistics and transportation research and opportunity analysis Large existing logistics business base in all four sub-regions Airports: Williamson County Regional, Mt. Vernon, Sparta, Jackson County, Pinckneyville SIUE International Trade Center Weak regional understanding of how to tap the global market Historically, logistics and transportation centers have been on other interstates Highly fragmented and competitive logistics and transportation industry eCommerce & Connectivity eCommerce is growing 6xs faster than the U.S. economy Apply connectivity applications to improve community efficiencies Develop connectivity strategies to support other economic and market opportunities Hundreds of SI unique niche products and services; artisans, wineries, graphic design and marketing Network Provider COI with over 30 providers working together towards clear goals SIU and SIs Community College System Low broadband coverage and penetration rates in the region Limited understanding of eCommerce systems and strategies Limited knowledge of connectivity applications to bring efficiencies Senior Living 77 million baby boomers present an affluent market 75% of the countries wealth is residing with active adults desiring many of the attributes of SI Specialty healthcare products & services Nutraceuticals Linking education assets for life long learning opportunities Rural living; 120% increase 1970-1996 SIU School of Health Sciences Heartland, SIH, Good Samaritan and other healthcare institutions Very knowledgeable and dedicated healthcare administrators Center for Rural Health Mild climate Low cost of living Boomers going rural SIU and SIs Community College System Access to healthcare is perceived as limited and low in quality Small amount of existing knowledge and facilities in the region supporting senior living alternatives SI understanding of senior living opportunity is limited to lower income seniors & assisted living lifestyles Providing amenities sought by retirees 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources Opportunities, Link to Regional Assets & Challenges (1 of 4)

16 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 16 Opportunities, Link to Regional Assets & Challenges (2 of 4) OpportunitiesLinks to Regional AssetsChallenges Global Workforce Opportunities Transform SI into the corporate casting agent for the 21 st century Leverage over 60 years of SIU with students from over 100 cultures Embrace workers in their 50s and 60s create a climate of freedom to work Higher than average % of 19-24 age bracket in the region – SIU & College students Man-Tra-Con, other workforce development agencies SIU international students Large number of SIU graduates with workforce development degrees Knowledge and expertise for developing countries in agriculture, coal mining and manufacturing Economic opportunity perceived as local and not global Limited understanding and history of immigrant workers Culture of dependency on government and corporate welfare Retraining programs and facilities not focused on new economy Energy & Mining Increasing cost of energy driving new technologies for older forms of material Coal mining, clean coal technologies Regional energy strategies Alternative energy innovations Transportation fuels sources SIU Energy Center of Excellence Significant coal deposits SIU Coal Research Center Robust energy knowledge base in the region Dixon Springs Agriculture Research Center Large clean water supply Underground abandoned mines Proximity: 8 hour drive time to over 2/3 U.S. market Energy Co-ops; knowledge, generation and transmission Political and policy decisions regarding coal utilization Energy projects very high in capital cost Converting coal to electric power cleanly and cost effectively KBE and Innovation Knowledge drives jobs & wealth creation 90% of all new jobs created by companies of 50 employees or less Link SIU research to business incubator, expertise and capital Global R&D collaborations Higher than average % of 19-24 age bracket in the region – SIU and College students SIU R&D: Energy and Environment, Biotechnology, Material Technology, Neuroscience Coal mining related knowledge; safety, technologies Incubators; Dunn Richmond Center, West Frankfurt, Mounds and multiple vacant buildings suitable for business incubators SIU Coal Research Center Dixon Springs Ag Research Center Community Colleges State Crime Lab Belief that job opportunities are with large manufacturing companies, not startup businesses Entrepreneurship not seen as a real job Limited start-up business financing Weak tech transfer system with SIU Lack of connection of resources to support the entire region Not enough business incubator facilities 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources

17 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 17 Opportunities, Link to Regional Assets & Challenges (3 of 4) OpportunitiesLinks to Regional AssetsChallenges Tourism International tourism will double by 2020 Eco, culture, history and adventure tourism Recreational tourism focusing on SI unique qualities 28% increase in arts and culture industry including community events Majority of tourism bookings being made on-line $300-$400 million increase in SI tourism industry 4 hours drive time from 11.3M potential customers Sparta World Shooting Complex Shawnee National Forest and other natural environment sites Outfitters and hunting lodges Vast historical knowledge of area Extensive historical sites in SI B & B Association Wine and Art Trails River-to-River Trail Number of unique existing community festivals attracting 100,000+ guests Numerous museums and art galleries Lack of experience in collaborative regional tourism marketing Overall poor quality and quantity of lodging facilities except in Metropolis, Carbondale & Marion Low quality accommodations and facilities in Shawnee National Park and other State Parks Protectionism within community tourism organizations Historically, poor tourism reputation of the region Weak on-line regional presence Livable Communities Microprenuers & KBE workers are mobile and attracted to active rural recreational lifestyles Recreational services and products, tourism, attractive communities KBE creation and attraction Visual and creative arts SI still has a number of small towns with a large amount of open spaces Proximity to natural environment amenities Locally grown food will become a $7 billion industry by 2011 Mild Climate Low cost of living Proximity to urban centers Shawnee National Forest Rend Lake Multiple State Parks Multiple trails for biking and hiking Wineries and arts Locally grown food products linked with farmers markets Proximity to major research university Robust Community College system Abundance of agricultural land and knowledge Low community respect & self-esteem for properties and infrastructure Belief that good healthcare is only available in out-of-region urban centers Historically not recognized as a knowledge region Limited entrepreneur culture and support systems Lack of community comprehensive planning, zoning standards or building code 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources

18 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 18 Opportunities, Link to Regional Assets & Challenges (4 of 4) OpportunitiesLinks to Regional AssetsChallenges Logistics, Transportation & Distribution SI is in a prime geographic location to seize the logistics and distribution markets Increasing cost of fuel makes waterborne transportation is attractive; Marine transportation services 70% increase in U.S. trade volumes from 1998 – 2020 10 nillion TEU (twenty-foot equivalent units for intermodal shipping) East-West trade deficit per year Increasing cost of fuel making waterborne transportation more economical Proximity: 8 hour drive time to over 2/3 U.S. energy market Full compliment of transportation infrastructure; interstate highways, airports, railways, rivers Strong existing base and experience of barge and river transport companies SIDEX logistics and transportation study Large existing trucking industry in SI Mississippi & Ohio Rivers Export based manufacturers CN Rail The rapid growth in the logistics industry has been occurring outside of the region Limited East-West rail systems Weak collaboration within and across industry sub-sectors 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources

19 ©2007 ViTAL Economy, Inc. 19 We See A Bountiful Southern Illinois Vital Economys View: We have fallen in love with SI; we see it as the Land of the Garden of the Gods Prime central North American location in close proximity to over 11 million people 425,000 population produces a $17.6 billion economy equivalent to a major metro-area Multi-directional Interstate highway, waterway and rail road infrastructure Major research university, robust Community College System and workforce development assets Modern and growing healthcare facilities Large National Forest and numerous unique tourist attractions Extensive mineral, agricultural and unique natural environmental assets Rich soils, mild climate and abundant water resources Numerous innovative and leading industry companies and an entrepreneurship spirit Special, welcoming, talented & caring people who want better for their families Young & old who see SI for the treasure it is, and desire stewardship that reflects its value ViTAL Economy Conclusion: Southern Illinois has more assets at its disposal than any other region the Team has advised in 15 years ViTAL Economy Conclusion: Southern Illinois has more assets at its disposal than any other region the Team has advised in 15 years 2.03 SIs Unique & Leveragable Resources


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