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©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. ViTAL Economy Alliance Initial Market Assessment Transportation Distribution and Logistics Cluster.

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Presentation on theme: "©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. ViTAL Economy Alliance Initial Market Assessment Transportation Distribution and Logistics Cluster."— Presentation transcript:

1 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. ViTAL Economy Alliance Initial Market Assessment Transportation Distribution and Logistics Cluster

2 2 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Industry Life Cycle: Five Stages Embryonic Introduction Growth Maturity Decline Embryonic: An entrepreneur struggles to make the transition from idea to working concept. Introduction: New, unique offering developed and patented. Focused on small group of customers Growth: Market demand grows as the product is accepted. Significant funds required to increase the scale of production. Economies of scale increase; costs decrease. More new entrants join the industry; competition intensifies. Maturity: Growth slows. Industry dominated by a few large companies. Few new product innovations. Decline: Sales decreasing at an accelerating rate. Mergers and consolidations may occur in an effort to remain competitive and maintain profits Container on Barge Distribution Centers

3 3 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Evaluating Cluster Potential Maximizing Economic Development Potential INDIGENOUS COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE People Location Indigenous Assets Infrastructure Technology MARKET ATTRACTIVENESS Low High Low High Potential Clusters Clusters that leverage indigenous competitive advantage x high market attractiveness create sustainable economic development

4 4 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Comments on Transport Developments Transport industry typically reorganizes during recessions to reduce costs, increase services Unclear how future will look Observations Fuel costs will encourage transport by energy efficient modes – rail and marine International through regional connectivity will be a competitive advantage The South Atlantic and Gulf will increase in importance as transportation gateways to the US

5 5 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Examples of Opportunities for SI Distribution Centers Distribution Centers growing throughout Mid West. Responding to new Supply Chain management approaches. Short-line Rail Short-line rail has expanded since rail deregulation. Many business inquires in SI related to rail access. River Terminals High energy costs making marine transport attractive. Container on barge developing.

6 6 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Life Cycle Consideration The niches in the business life cycle Short-Line Railroads Over 500 short-line and regional railroads in U.S., including 17 in Illinois Industry has grown substantially since rail deregulation in 1980 as Class I Railroads abandoned or sold off much of their mainline trackage Increasing fuel and road maintenance costs for truck transport lead short-line railroads to be increasingly competitive for short haul traffic

7 7 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Cluster Scale: Will it Contribute to SIs Goals? Short-Line Railroads Examples of companies Shawnee Terminal Railway Vandalia Railroad Decatur Junction Railroad Average short line RR in the U.S. operates 85 miles of track and employs 36 workers (American Short Line Railroad Association, 2002) Wide range of size in track length (from a few miles to several hundred miles), employment, capital depending on purpose

8 8 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Short Lines Market Segments Market Segmentation: Short-Line Railroads The best segments have Potential, Lifespan, Accessibility, and Profitability. Short-Haul Railroads Regional Railroads Switching Railroads Local scale, switching services between major rail lines Longer haul feeder service connecting with major rail lines Often former branch lines or spurs, connecting specific industries, commodity terminals or manufacturing plants to major railroads

9 9 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Life Cycle Consideration – River Terminals The niches in the business life cycle River Terminals Recent growth in river terminals has been relatively flat as a whole, varying from positive to negative growth by segment Projected or potential growth in specific niches such as container-on-barge traffic Southern Illinois is centrally located, has 2 major rivers, ports of entry, trucking and rail support infrastructure

10 10 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Cluster Scale: Will it Contribute to SIs Goals? River Terminals Hundreds of terminals on Mississippi and Ohio River systems Varying in size from major ports (e.g. New Orleans, Memphis) to smaller terminals for single commodities Typical terminal for grain handling employs between workers

11 11 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Market Segments Market Segmentation: River Terminals Container-on-Barge Coal Grain Aggregates Fertilizer The best segments have Potential, Lifespan, Accessibility, and Profitability. River Terminals

12 12 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Cluster Scale: Will it Contribute to SIs Goals? Regional Distribution Centers Examples of companies Large companies with in house DCs Major department stores e.g. Walmart, Target Home Improvement Specialty big-box stores e.g. electronics retailers Third Party Logistics providers (3PLs) Operate DCs serving Single client or multiple clients from one DC Large regional distribution center for a major retailer: ~1.5 million sq. ft, ~500 employees Capital investment for DC of this size would be on order of $100 million

13 13 ©2009 ViTAL Economy, Inc. Market Segments Market Segmentation: Regional DCs The best segments have Potential, Lifespan, Accessibility, and Profitability. Large Department Stores Home Improvement Stores Big Box Specialty Retailers Food/Grocery 3PLs – Single-client DCs 3PLs – Multi-client DCs Regional DCs


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