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California Department of Education English Learners with Disabilities or Other Special Needs Extended Module Preschool English Learners Resource Guide.

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Presentation on theme: "California Department of Education English Learners with Disabilities or Other Special Needs Extended Module Preschool English Learners Resource Guide."— Presentation transcript:

1 California Department of Education English Learners with Disabilities or Other Special Needs Extended Module Preschool English Learners Resource Guide Chapter 7 Extended Module

2 California Department of Education Opening A beach has many shells! Find the perfect shell Share your insights, thoughts and ideas 2

3 California Department of Education Outcomes 1.Become familiar with the California Early Learning and Development System and regulations related to special education. 2.Develop a better understanding of the characteristics of language disorder and language difference based on cultural consideration. 3.Explore cultural considerations and research based instructional strategies for English Learners with disabilities or other special needs. 4.Become familiar with statewide and local resources. 3

4 California Department of Education 4

5 California Department of Education Special Education Division Early Childhood Support System IDEA: PART B PART C State Performance Plan Annual Performance Report Desired Results access Project Early Childhood Special Education Handbooks Preschool Learning Foundations Child Development Division SEEDS Supporting Early Education Delivery Systems SEECAP Special Education Early Childhood Administrators Project CPIN California Preschool Instructional Network 5

6 California Department of Education At Age Three… (1) Local Education Agencies (LEAs) must provide Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE). § 300.101 (2) If a child transitions from a Part C program, the LEA must provide an IEP by the childs 3 rd birthday. § 300.323(b). 6

7 California Department of Education Access to Regular Preschool Activities (i) To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children who are nondisabled. (ii) …removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environments occurs only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes…cannot be achieved satisfactorily (this includes preschool). §300.114 (a)(2) Preschool Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) 7

8 California Department of Education Special Education Provides services and supports for children with disabilities Occurs in a variety of settings Ensures access to regular preschool activities that any typically developing children engage in 8

9 California Department of Education IEP Team Members Legally Required -Family or Guardian -Designated Instruction Service Provider (Specialists) -Early Childhood Special Education Teacher -General Education Preschool Teacher -Administrator or designee -Interpreter Recommended -Agency Representative (may be required if transitioning from Part C program) -Others as requested by family or district 9

10 California Department of Education Activity Connections to Principles & Practices Principle 8 Coordination and collaboration among families, teachers, and specialists become crucial in supporting the language and literacy development of children with disabilities or other special needs. 10 Practices Read and review the principle and the practices. Share successful strategies you have previously used and any new strategies you gained from the reading. PEL Guide, p. 69 Handout 1 10

11 California Department of Education Preschool Children with IEPs by Ethnicity and Disability (CDE Dataquest, June 08) 11

12 California Department of Education What do you think? Agree (A) or Disagree (D) Preschool children with disabilities are not capable of being bilingual. A preschool child with a disability will be confused by being exposed to more than one language. Preschool children who are bilingual and have a disability will be better off in a setting where they only hear English. Many of the principles and practices in the PEL Guide apply to children with disabilities who are learning English. Disabilities could be seen as disgraceful or socially unacceptable in some families. Limited English skills are sometimes mistaken for disabilities. Handout 2 12

13 California Department of Education False Assumption 1 Children with language disorders and/or other disabilities should not receive bilingual intervention; they will get more confused trying to learn two languages as opposed to learning only one language. 13

14 California Department of Education Fact There is no evidence that a bilingual approach in intervention would confuse or tax the learning abilities of children with disabilities. Gutiérrez-Clellen, Language Choice in Intervention With Bilingual Children, 1999, p. 299. Instruction in the primary language is especially beneficial when new concepts are first introduced. Once a concept has been acquired in the primary language, transfer to a second language will be easier. Roseberry-McKibbin, C. 2002, p. 281. 14

15 California Department of Education Fact Children with disabilities can learn more than one language and can function bilingually as effectively as their typically developing peers. Candelaria-Greene, 1996 & Miles, 1996, PEL Guide p. 66 15

16 California Department of Education False Assumption 2 If children with language disorders learn a second language, they may make more errors in grammar. 16

17 California Department of Education Fact Bilingual children with language disorders are NOT more delayed than monolingual children with language disorders…They do not make more errors than monolingual children. For children between the ages of 4 years 5 months and 6 years, bilinguals with language impairment do not appear to have greater difficulty with learning two languages compared to children who are only learning one language. Gutiérrez-Clellen, V.F., Simon-Cereijido, G, & Wagner, C., 2008, P.17. 17

18 California Department of Education What have we learned? Californias Early Learning and Development System Special Education Division Early Childhood Support System Special Education Law - IDEA 2004 False Assumptions and Facts 18

19 California Department of Education Language Disorder or Language Difference PEL Guide P. 64 Handout 3 Ethel I Baker Preschool Program

20 California Department of Education Early Warning Signs for 3 to 5 year Olds Shows difficulty following simple directions in either language Exhibits immature speech and language in both languages By age 3, does not try to say familiar rhymes or songs By age 4, does not tell stories, whether real or make-believe, or ask questions Dunlap, L. L. (2009), McLaughlin, S. (2006), Hamaguchi (2001), CDE brochure 20

21 California Department of Education Behaviors Demonstrated by English Learners and Children with Language Disorders Speaks infrequently Speaks excessively (in home language or in English) Confuses similar sounding words Cannot tell or retell stories Exhibits poor recall of information Has poor pronunciation of English sounds Uses poor syntax/grammar in English Does not volunteer information PEL Guide, P. 64, Ortiz, A. A. & Maldonado-Colon, E., 1986 Handout 4 21

22 California Department of Education Research Highlight Second language learners might exhibit social interaction patterns along with limited communication abilities that are similar to those exhibited by children identified with specific language and/or speech impairments. Thus, it is not uncommon for many of these children to be labeled as having challenging behaviors or communication disorders when in fact they are following a fairly typical developmental path in acquiring second language. Santos & Ostrosky, 2002, P.2 22

23 California Department of Education Cultural Considerations 23

24 California Department of Education Cultural Consideration #1: Perspectives on Educational Beliefs In some cultures, special education is not dealt with as openly as it is in the mainstream American culture. Therefore, educators need to be honest and talk about how the mainstream American culture believes that many children need help to better navigate the educational system. Our special education services may be a viable option for English Learners with disabilities. 24

25 California Department of Education Cultural Consideration #2: Perspectives on Educational Practices Families practice different ways of learning. Therefore, educators need to be aware of each familys values. -Independence vs Interdependence -Individual work vs Group work 25

26 California Department of Education Cultural Consideration #3: Perspectives on Communication Styles Families have different forms of conversation based on age and social status. Therefore educators need to know the different expectations when children interact with adults. 26

27 California Department of Education Frequently Asked Questions 27

28 California Department of Education Answer 1 Yes. What is important to remember is that the child with a disability or special needs who is growing up in a bilingual family or community will benefit from learning both the home language and English just like any other child. Zip Around Activity: I Have a Question on... 28 Question 1 Is it OK for me to use English and the childs home language at school when the child has a disability?

29 California Department of Education Zip Around Activity: I Have a Question on... Question 2 How do I know if a child is experiencing difficulties in learning a language, such as a speech disorder, or is just going through the process of second language acquisition? 29 Answer 2 Careful observation, documentation over time, and in multiple settings, and gathering information from the many adults who know the child will provide a more accurate picture of the childs language abilities in his/her home language and in his/her second language. The English Learning for Preschoolers Project, Children with Special Needs: http://www.edgateway.net/pub/docs/pel/children.htm

30 California Department of Education Question 3 How long do I wait to make a referral when I have concerns regarding a child who is learning English as a second language? Zip Around Activity: I Have a Question on... 30 Answer 3 English learners need a period of adjustment in which they are supported, encouraged and provided with learning experiences that meet them where they are academically and linguistically. How long that period is depends on the individual child. Dr. Echevarria from http://www.ncld.org/content/view/818/, National Center for LD

31 California Department of Education What do you think? True (T) or False (F) Preschool children with disabilities are not capable of being bilingual. A preschool child with a disability will be confused by being exposed to more than one language. Preschool children who are bilingual and have a disability will be better off in a setting where they only hear English. Many of the principles and practices in the PEL Guide apply to children with disabilities who are learning English. Disabilities could be seen as disgraceful or socially unacceptable in some families. Limited English skills are sometimes mistaken for disabilities. F F F T T T Handout 2 31

32 California Department of Education Strategies Handout 5 Handout 5.1 32

33 California Department of Education Strategies… Making Preschool Accessible 1.Responsive Practices 2.Adaptations 3.Accessible Curriculum - Universal Design - Differentiating Instruction 33

34 California Department of Education 1. Responsive Practices 1)Use body language and visuals 2)Learn key words and phrases in childs home language 3)Use language and literacy activities that contain repetitive refrains 4)Use narratives to describe a childs actions 5)Longer wait time for responses – 5 seconds or more 34

35 California Department of Education 2. Adaptations Changes in the environment or observed behavior that allow children with disabilities to participate in the same assessment as their peers. Handout 6 35

36 California Department of Education Augmentative or Alternative Communication Systems Another system of communication may be used when the child cannot use spoken language. Assessors should observe the child using language in a natural context rather than contriving an adult- directed situation. The child's home language, if other than English, is also acceptable. Handout 7 36

37 California Department of Education Sensory Support Some examples include: reducing background noise, adjusting tactile stimulation, and adjusting visual stimulation. 37

38 California Department of Education Communication Adaptation in Inclusive Classrooms May Look Like… 38

39 California Department of Education Adaptive Materials for Preschool English Learners with Disabilities Handout 8 39

40 California Department of Education Book Activity: Easy-To-Turn Pages Handout 9 40

41 California Department of Education 3. Accessible Curriculum Is for all children so they can participate in a meaningful way in daily routines and activities including: Differentiated instruction to meet individual needs Universal design for learning Adaptations based on progress monitoring and data Special education services and supports Promoting Positive Outcomes for Children with Disabilities. Division for Early Childhood. 2007, p.4. Handout 10 41

42 California Department of Education The Inclusive Classroom intentional instruction Instructional goals and objectives based on a students IEP need to be embedded within the normally occurring routines and contexts of home, day care, and preschool. Because children with special needs need intentional instruction, it is important in inclusive settings to make adaptations that focus on maintaining an intense level of instruction, purposeful participation in activities, and educational achievement. Adapted from the National Forum of Special Education Journal, 16 (1), 2005. 42

43 Lets Visit an Inclusive Classroom! Welcoming ALL Children Traub, E., Hutter-Pishgahi, L., & Freeman, T. (2004) Handout 11 Center Time Transition Time Meal Time Circle Time Outside Play Time 43

44 California Department of Education Circle Time Plan a shorter circle time as needed Use preferential seating for an EL with a hearing impairment Use a clear routine and sequence of actions Provide Wait Time Provide bilingual materials Reinforce for good behavior verbally 44

45 California Department of Education Circle Time in Inclusive Classrooms May Look Like… 45

46 California Department of Education Meal Time Encourage conversational turn taking (Strive for 5!). Include words and concepts relevant to every childs home experience and cultural backgrounds. Put a non-slip work surface (drawer liner) under dishes, cups, and utensils. Use open ended questions. 46

47 California Department of Education Meal Time in Inclusive Classrooms May Look Like… 47

48 California Department of Education Center Time Have a parent read classroom books in the home language. Place multi-lingual audio tapes in the listening area. Encourage children to work in pairs. Arrange the classroom so all children can move around easily. Provide materials that are easy to grasp or manipulate in the discovery area and all areas. 48

49 California Department of Education Center Time in Inclusive Classrooms May Look Like … 49

50 California Department of Education Transition Time Use a picture or object to represent what will happen next. Prompt the child to watch and follow where the peers in the classroom are going. Give simple verbal, auditory, visual cues, or tactile prompts before the transition occurs. 50

51 California Department of Education Outside Play Time Provide various sensory activities during outside play time. Provide an outdoor setting that encourages language development and communication. 51

52 California Department of Education Outside Time in Inclusive Classrooms May Look like… 52

53 California Department of Education Pair Share What are some of the ideas/strategies that stood out for you in the video clip? What ideas/strategies did you hear that might be helpful for your students? 53

54 California Department of Education Collaborative Partners and Resources

55 California Department of Education Collaborative Partners in Inclusive Settings May Look Like… 55

56 California Department of Education Transition Time in Collaborative Classrooms May Look Like… 56

57 California Department of Education The Elements of Successful Collaboration Table Talk -Share experiences and strategies of effective collaboration 57

58 California Department of Education The Elements of Successful Collaboration Children and Families first! Knowledgeable staff Supportive administrators Communication and cooperation Clear understanding of each role Shared goals Mutual respect Humor 58

59 California Department of Education Partners: School District Families Pre/K Special Education Teachers and K Teachers Administrators Designated Instructional Service (DIS) Providers – speech and language specialist – school psychologist – physical therapist – occupational therapist – assistive technology specialist English as a Second Language Specialist Bilingual Assistant/Interpreter 59

60 California Department of Education Partners: State Agencies California Department of Education (CDE) - Special Education Division (SED) - Child Development Division (CDD) Department of Developmental Services (DDS) - Regional Centers California Children's Services (CCS) 60

61 California Department of Education Resources in California California Preschool Instructional Network (CPIN): www.cpin.us Supporting Early Education Delivery Systems (SEEDS): www.scoe.net/seeds Desired Results for Children and Families: www.wested.org/desiredresults/training Desired Results access Project: www.draccess.org Special Education Early Childhood Administrators Project (SEECAP): www.sdcoe.net/seecap California Association for the Education of Young Children (CAEYC): http://caeyc.org/main/page/navhome 61

62 California Department of Education National Resources Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood Education (DEC: http://www.dec-sped.org) National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC: http://www.naeyc.org/ece) National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC: http://www.nectac.org) 62

63 California Department of Education Closure Revisit the Outcomes 1.Become familiar with the California Early Learning and Development System and regulations related to special education. 2.Develop a better understanding of the characteristics of language disorder and language difference. 3.Explore cultural considerations and research based instructional strategies for English Learners with disabilities or other special needs. 4.Become familiar with statewide and local resources. 63

64 California Department of Education References Belk, J. (2005). The Inclusion in early childhood programs: A kaleidoscope of diversity, National Forum of Special Education Journal, 16 (1). California Department of Education brochure, Reasons for Concern that Your Child or A Child in Your Care May Need Special Help, from http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/se/fp/concerns.asp or http//www.dds.ca.gov/earlystart California Department of Education (2008). California Preschool Learning Foundations: Volume One. Sacramento, CA: Author. California Department of Education (2009). Preschool English Learners: Principles and Practices to Promote Language, Literacy and Learning. Sacramento, CA: Author. Chen, J., & McNamee, D. (2007). Assessing for teaching and learning in early childhood classrooms. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Dunlap, L. L. (2009). An introduction to early childhood special education, birth to age five. p. 167, Figure 6.3, Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. Genesee, F., Paradis, J., & Crago, M. (2004). Dual Language Development & Disorders, Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co., Inc, Baltimore, Maryland. Gould, P. & Sullivan J. (1999). The Inclusive Early Childhood Classroom: Easy Ways to Adapt Learning Centers for All Children. Gryphon House, Inc., Beltsville, MD. Gutierrez-Clellen,V. (1999). Language choice in intervention with bilingual children. American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, 8, 291–302. 64

65 California Department of Education References Gutiérrez-Clellen, V., Simon-Cereijido, G, & Wagner, C. (2008). Bilingual children with language impairment: A comparison with monolinguals and second language learners. Applied Psycholinguistics, 29, 3-19. Hamaguchi, P. A. (2001). Childhood speech, language, and listening problems: What every parent should know. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Klein, M. D. & Chen, D. (2001). Working with Children from Culturally Diverse Backgrounds, Delmar Cengage Learning. Klein, M. D., Cook, R. E., & Richardson-Gibbs, A. M. (2001). Strategies for Including Children with Special Needs in Early Childhood Settings. Delmar, Thomson Learning McLean, M., & Matias, S. (2007). Assessing Children with Disabilities Who are English Learners: Guidance for the DRDP access and the PS DRDP-R for Children with IEPs, Sacramento, California: Department of Education, Special Education Division. www.draccess.org. McLaughlin, S. (2006). Introduction to Language Development (2 nd ed.), San Diego, CA: Thomson/DelMar Learning. Paradis, J. & Genesee, F. (1996). Syntactic acquisition in bilingual children: Autonomous or Interdependent?, Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 18, 1-25. Pearson, B. Z., Fernández, S. C., Lewedeg, & Oller, D. K. (1997). The relation of input factors to lexical learning by bilingual infants. Applied Psycholinguistics, 18, 41-58. 65

66 California Department of Education References Rhodes, R., Ochoa, S., & Ortiz, S. (2005). Assessing culturally and linguistically diverse students, New York: Guilford Publications. Roseberry-McKibbin, C. (2002). Multicultural students with special language needs: Practical strategies for assessment and intervention (2nd ed.). Oceanside, CA: Academic Communication Associates. Santa Clara County Office Of Education (2009). Inclusion Collaborative, www.inclusion collaborative.org Sandall et al. (2005). as cited in Promoting Positive Outcomes for Children with Disabilities. Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood, p. 4. Sandall, S., Hemmeter, M. L., Smith, B.J., & McLean, M. (2005). DEC recommended practices: A comprehensive guide for practical application. Missoula, MT: DEC. Seung, H., Siddiqi, S., & Elder, J. H. (2006). Intervention outcomes of a bilingual child with autism, Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 14 (1), pp. 58-63, Delmar Learning. a division of Thomson Learning. Inc. Supporting Early Childhood Delivery Systems (SEEDS) Project (2007). Sacramento County Office Of Education, www.scoe.net/seeds/resources/at/at.html NAEYC (2005). Screening and assessment of young English-language learners. Supplement to the NAEYC & NAECS/SDE joint position statement on early childhood curriculum, assessment, and program evaluation. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from www.naeyc.org/about/positions/ELL_Supplement.asp. 66


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