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Transitions: Preschool to Kindergarten and Beyond

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1 Transitions: Preschool to Kindergarten and Beyond
California Preschool Instructional Network CA Department of Education and SEEDS Prepared by Linda Brault (Handbook on Transition from Early Childhood Special Education Programs ) Leads would put their name and region on this title slide. If you talk about Shelia’s model on slides # 18 to #22. You should reference it as a model from Orange County.

2 a passage from one state, stage, or place to another:
Transition: a passage from one state, stage, or place to another: CHANGE ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

3 Reflection Think of a time you went through transition…
What was the experience like for you? Share with an elbow partner. This is an icebreaker. This activity will take from 5-7 minutes. The partner share should be about a minute each. Ask the group…In the partner share was there anything you and your partner had in common or are there any other insights you would like to share? Chart the the responses.

4 Starting school is an important time for young children, their families, and educators. It has been described as “one of the major challenges” children have to face in their early childhood years. The transition to formal schooling is a landmark event for millions of children, families and educators.” Early Childhood Research and Practice and the National Center for Early Development and Learning, 2002 This is a connecting slide, taking the previous personal experiences/emotions and transferring similar aspects to transition to school. This is a significant time of change which brings new opportunities and challenges. Information on “change” presented last year by M. Astore is a also great support.

5 Transition to Kindergarten Early Childhood Research & Policy Briefs, 2003 An Article Review
Why is the transition to Kindergarten so important? What are typical ways that U.S. schools support this transition? What barriers impact efforts to transition? This research and policy brief is a foundational piece, and the following slides are the highlights. These questions address the essence of the article. Participants may read this article in advance, or you may jigsaw it during the meeting. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

6 Why is Transition Important?
Establishes competencies critical to children’s school success and achievement. Learning environments are quite different from traditional elementary school classroom settings. Children’s experiences prior to kindergarten are different now than they were a generation ago. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

7 Why is Transition Important? Continued
Increasingly large amounts of public funds are now dedicated to educating young children with the intent of boosting their chances for success in elementary school and beyond. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

8 “Children who make a smooth transition and experience early school success tend to maintain higher levels of social competence and academic achievement.” (Alexander & Entiwisle, 1988; Early, Pianta, and Cox, 1999; Luster and McAdoo, 1996; Shepard and Smith, 1998)

9 How Do U.S. Schools Support the Transition to Kindergarten?
Common Practice: Send a letter to parents after the beginning of school. Hold an open house after school starts. Send a brochure home after school starts. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

10 How Do U.S. Schools Support the Transition to Kindergarten?
Uncommon Practice: Call the child before or after school starts. Visit the child’s home or preschool program(s). Invite children to spend the day in the receiving classroom. You could ask audience for others if you want. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

11 The transition practices commonly used in school may not be well suited to the needs of children and families. National Center for Early Development and Learning (NCEDL) A summary point to consider. Question to ponder…what needs to happen for effective transition? ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

12 Moving Toward Effective Transition
National Center for Early Development and Learning: -parent/teacher discussions -trust building through home visits and accompanying families on school visits -meetings between preschool and elementary teachers -school to home demonstrations The Transition to School: What’s Important? (S. Dockett and B. Perry, Educational Leadership, April 2003) ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

13 The Transition to School: What’s Important?
“The Starting School Research Project in Australia” Sue Dockett and Bob Perry Introduction info (in article): Research suggests smooth transitions/experiences contribute to early school success: higher social competence and academic achievement. This project (New South Wales, Australia) focuses on several years of interviews and surveys investigating which factors children, parents, and teachers consider to be important in transition. By analyzing these responses, the study identifies eight important areas that affect transition to school: knowledge, social adjustment to the school context, skills, disposition, rules, physical attributes or characteristics, family issues and, education environment. Based on this information, researchers formulated guidelines for transition.

14 Jigsaw Research Article
Working with Remote Communities (pg. 32) 2. Communicating across the EC Sector (pg. 33) 3. Children’s Voices in the Transition to School (pg. 33) DIRECTIONS FOR THIS ACTIVITY-This is 1. Spend a few minutes and read your section. 2. Highlight what stands out for you. In your table groups, chart the highlights. Choose someone to be the recorder and someone to be the docent. We are going to do a museum where groups move from one chart to the next. 6. The docent will remain behind to clarify or answer any questions the visitors may have.

15 The Transition to School: What’s Important?
Effective Transition Programs: Establish positive relationships among the children, parents, and educators. Are based on mutual trust and respect. Facilitate each child’s development as a capable learner. Have dedicated adequate funding and resources. Are flexible and responsive. The research group found the following (aligned with this and next slide): Premise and belief system for effective transition programs: We are committed to the fact that starting school is not just an experience for the individual child. Rather, it is a community experience, involving a wide range of people.In addition to the child, the family and the community in which the family lives are involved. Educators in prior-to-school settings have an important role to play, and all school staff, not just the kindergarten teacher, are crucial to the effectiveness of the transition experience. In other words, staring school is a community issue and a community responsibility. When communities work together, and when children realize that they have the support of groups within their respective communities, starting school can be a positive and exciting experience. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

16 The Transition To School: What’s Important?
Effective Transition Programs: Are well planned and evaluated. Involve a range of stakeholders. Take into account the context of the community and its individual families and children. Rely on reciprocal communication among participants. Develop long-term individualized “transition-to-school programs,” not just short-term orientation sessions. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

17 “The relationship that children have with adults and other children in families, child care, and school programs provide the foundation for their success in school.” (Pianta and Walsh, 1996; Rimm-Kaufman and Pianta, 2001) ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

18 Transition…An Elementary School Story
97% free/reduced lunch 79% second language learners 95% actual attendance record 40% multiple-family homes Overcrowded school: 2x intended number Shelia shares her story but you should feel free to add your own story…make it real! ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

19 Transition…An Elementary School Story
Year round, multiple track, K-2 staggered sessions Immediate Intervention/Underperforming School (II/USP) Title I and Economic Impact Aid-Limited English Proficient Preschool-6th grade classes Bilingual teachers, resource teachers, instructional aides If you use Shelia’s example acknowledge that this is what a colleague did in her region. Add your own story if you wish…make it real! ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

20 Transition Plan Vision: Teachers, administrators, parents, and
students will collaborate together so that children entering kindergarten are cognitively, socially, emotionally, and physically ready to master the kindergarten standards. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

21 Needs: Action: Create a transition team Provide an organizational
meeting with transition team Facilitate collaborative meetings Devise an action plan* Evaluate transition process Revise and plan for next year Invite preschool, kindergarten, resource teachers, child care providers, parents, administrators Establish a vision; set norms; set meeting dates Investigate the community/survey needs Hold meetings to discuss needs Brainstorm actions based upon collaborative meetings Set three checkpoints for the transition team throughout the process; utilize time to discuss what is working and what needs to be changed; plan for changes Seek feedback from necessary participants Transition team utilize feedback information to plan for the new cycle ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

22 Elementary Transition Action Plan
Needs Action Time Professional Development in Language and Literacy Participate in SEED training Two day training; visit Preschool-Kindergarten Collaboration Build a collaborative learning community: Preschool/kindergarten site programs Guidelines/Standards/Expectations Classroom visits/substitutes New student parent meeting New student assessment Preparing for new students On-going assessments/student data Portfolio exchange Monthly meetings Parent/Family Education Preparing Children for School Family Education Nights CBET Initial and On-going Parent Participation Home Visits Translation Incentives and transportation ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

23 Transitions & the Desired Results Developmental Profile
Staff must obtain consent from the family before sharing Desired Results information. Child Development Progress Form is what should be shared. Desired Results information can be shared by the family or it can be mailed to the school. It may be helpful to share some samples of the child’s work.

24 The transition to school “sets the tone and
direction” of a child’s school career (Pianta & Kraft-Sayre, 1999) and it has been described in the literature as a rite of passage associated with increased status, a turning point in a child’s life. (Christensen, 1998) ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

25 Resources Pianta, R. & Kraft-Sayre M., (2003) Successful Kindergarten Transitions: Your Guide to Connecting Children, Families & Schools. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., Baltimore

26 Reflect and Share 1. On a note card, list transition efforts at your site. 2. Share with an elbow partner. Discuss: What are common strategies utilized? What strategies stood out as unique? This is an optional slide/activity that you can use if you want. IF YOU DO NOT USE THE ACTIVITY DELETE THE SLIDE FROM YOUR PRESENTATION. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

27 Transition from Preschool to Kindergarten
For Children with Disabilities and their Families Special Ed Lead can add their name and region to this slide.

28 Transition Begins Early
Many children with disabilities and their families have already experienced many transitions: From hospital to home Into Part C infant services Into Part B preschool services TRANSITION From Preschool Times of transition in family’s lives… Quote from a parent: I think one thing that I could have been told was that transition is a process. It’s a process that takes years, and every time that something changes, it’s going to be different. Bringing the baby home… Federal Law Part C Infant to 3years (Children have an IFSP - Infant/Family Service Plan which has more of a family focus than an IEP which means there may be changes in the case carrier and less home visits.) Part B 3-22years (Children and families move to an IEP or Individual Education Plan which is more child focused) We will look at the issues for agencies and families, laws that govern this process and practices that make for smooth transitions… ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

29 TRANSITION From Preschool
While federal requirements drive transition, the purpose remains the same… The purpose is to ensure a smooth transition with no interruption in services. Federal law under IDEA 04 drives transition requirements for Infant-Toddler and at age 3. Under state and federal laws, children with suspected disabilities must be referred to the LEA before age three so that the flow of services can continue with minimal disruption and again from preschool to K. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

30 Transition to Kindergarten
Issues for Agencies Legal Requirements Smooth Transitions Coordination and timing Transition activities Source: Transition Handbook, pp Issues for Families Need for information Opportunities to talk Understanding of new system and services Preparation for change Source: Transition Handbook, pp. 1-5 Philosophical and programmatic differences in service delivery The Law IEP considerations – where the child will receive special education services –LRE Environment, family goals, child strengths and needs, education program Family clear information, inviting conversation, what is the new environment like, preparations ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

31 Transition Requirements
The law requires that: appropriate reassessment to determine need of special education and services. gains made in the special education program are not lost by too rapid a removal of individualized programs and supports. a means of monitoring continued success. As part of the exit process from special education, the present performance levels and learning style shall be noted by the individualized education program team. California Education Code, Part 30, Chapter 4.45: §56445. Addresses appropriate practice and safeguards for decision making-LEADS ARE ENCOURAGED TO ADD PERSONAL EXPERIENCE TO ILLUSTRATE EACH OF THE FOLLOWING POINTS. Prior to transitioning an individual with exceptional needs from a preschool program to kindergarten, or first grade as the case may be, an appropriate reassessment of the individual shall be conducted pursuant to Article 2 (commencing with Section 56320) of Chapter 4 to determine if the individual is still in need of special education and services. (b) It is the intent of the Legislature that gains made in the special education program for individuals who received special education and services, in accordance with this chapter, are not lost by too rapid a removal of individualized programs and supports for these individuals. (c) As part of the transitioning process, a means of monitoring continued success of the child shall be identified by the individualized education program team for those children of kindergarten or first grade equivalency who are determined to be eligible for less intensive special education programs. (This can be tricky and often forgotten so if you can come up with an example that would help get the point across.) (d) As part of the exit process from special education, the present performance levels and learning style shall be noted by the individualized education program team. This information shall be made available to the assigned regular education teacher upon the child's enrollment in kindergarten or first grade as the case may be. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

32 Steps to a Smooth Transition
Establish relationships between preschool and elementary staff, identify the schools that children may be attending. Begin sharing information about the transition process with the family in the fall, connect them to general kindergarten transition activities. Preschool special education staff begins contact with potential receiving district. Establishing a smooth transition Between agencies For families Do this early Pages in Transition Handbook ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

33 Steps to a Smooth Transition
Reassessment Schedule 3-4 months ahead of the transition Complete and discuss educational implications 2 months ahead Conduct IEP Meeting Provide support at the beginning of the school year Special education requirements go hand in hand in planning for a child’s smooth transition. Schedule reassessment 3-4 months…in reality this may happen in Feb. when the transition is going to take place in Sept. which may mean 3-6 months ahead of transition. This will depend on your individual program. What we want to avoid is that the meetings take place in May or June not over the summer or right before or after school starts. Pages in Transition Handbook ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

34 Supporting a Smooth Transition
Develop relationships across agencies and programs. Examine attitudes and assumptions about agencies, families, practices. Ensure that current process and forms support you. Clarify any legal questions. Sample forms are provided as starting points. Begin the process of transition early Develop relationships with receiving agencies early Give families information Give clarifying information and use systems and organization to support the process ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

35 Supporting a Smooth Transition
Invite families in your programs (or program graduates), to share their transition experiences. Look for success stories Vignettes Recent transitions may provide more information Visitations Success stories-provide participants with the vignettes handout. What works in transition for the child, family and program. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

36 Guiding Principles Developed by the National Center for Early Development & Learning (NCEDL) Kindergarten Transition Studies to assist communities. The principles: Foster Relationships as Resources Promote Continuity from Preschool to Kindergarten Focus on Family Strengths Tailor Practices to Individual Needs Guiding Principles for Transition Principles that are useful for communities as they develop transition practices. Pages 26 in Transition Handbook ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

37 Website Resources fpg.unc.edu/~ncedl/
nectac.org/topics/transition/transition.asp ihdi.uky.edu/nectc/ ihdi.uky.edu/stepsweb/ ideapartnership.org dec-sped.org ncedl.org Resources should all have a WWW at the beginning of address. You may want to announce that if it doesn’t seem like people would know that. healthychild.ucla.edu/First5CAReadiness/TransitionKindergarten.asp ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

38 Resources Susan Sandall, Ph.D., Mary Louise Hemmeter, Ph.D., Mary McLean, Ph.D., and Barbara J. Smith, Ph.D. (2004). DEC Recommended Practices: A Comprehensive Guide for Practical Application. Colorado: Sopris West. Brault, L.M.J. (2005). Handbook on Transition in Early Childhood Special Education Programs. Sacramento, California: California Department of Education. Brault, L.M.J. (2005) Transitions: Smoothing the Path for Families. Handout developed for SEEDS to accompany presentations on the Handbook on Transitions in Early Childhood Special Education. Available from SEEDS or the author. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)

39 Cultural Considerations
Family considerations Families experiences around school Language differences Community considerations Within a particular population (Hmong or is there even a community) Regional considerations Urban vs. rural We are hoping to have a brief discussion about this section. This content is to be developed with input from the Regional Leads. We are looking for information in books or articles that can be used to assist in the development of this content. ©2008 California Department of Education (CDE), California Preschool Instructional Networks (CPIN)


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