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Migratory Species: Working Together Towards a Vision for 2020, May 16, 2007 Jennifer Wheeler, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Migratory Birds & Waterbird.

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Presentation on theme: "Migratory Species: Working Together Towards a Vision for 2020, May 16, 2007 Jennifer Wheeler, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Migratory Birds & Waterbird."— Presentation transcript:

1 Migratory Species: Working Together Towards a Vision for 2020, May 16, 2007 Jennifer Wheeler, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Migratory Birds & Waterbird Conservation for the Americas Seabird Conservation Activities in North America Opportunities and Challenges for Management of At-Sea Threats

2 Waterbird Conservation Council is the steering body for the Waterbird Conservation for the Americas initiative Scope is seabirds and other aquatic birds in the Western Hemisphere; current membership drawn from nations throughout the Americas as well as initiatives such as BirdLife International, WHSRN, CMS and Ramsar. Key outcomes of January 2007 meeting: – Intensified activities related to seabird conservation, and – Creation of a task force to develop a strategy for Americas-wide conservation of waterbirds Waterbird Conservation Council

3 Seabirds 101 Definitions, characteristics, and natural history Families: Diomedeidae (albatrosses) Procellariidae (petrels, shearwaters, fulmars) Hydrobatidae (storm-petrels) Phaethontidae (tropicbirds) Sulidae (boobies and gannets) Fregatidae (frigatebirds) Alcidae (auklets, murres, puffins) Laridae (terns/noddies) Photo Courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Photo by Glen TepkePhoto by Ralph Eldridge Photo by Bob Pitman Photo by Naomi BargmannPhoto by Heiko SpallekPhoto by Verena GillPhoto by Martin Renner

4 Global Conservation Status Many are in decline and threatened with extinction Diomedeidae, Procellariidae, and Hydrobatidae make-up 45% of global seabird species and 74% of seabird species on IUCN Red List NAWCP Assessments - 100% highly imperiled and > 80% of both highly imperiled AND high concern species fall within these families Data courtesy of BirdLife International

5 Overview of Threats impacts of non-native species on breeding grounds predation competition habitat alteration/loss disturbance fisheries interactions competition for prey incidental capture pollution (chronic and acute) oil biomagnification of contaminants in food web plastic debris ingestion entanglement global climate change Peter Ryan van Franeker

6 By Sea: Challenges and Opportunities in Science and Policy Photo by Mike Danzenbaker

7 Science: Distribution and Abundance ocean is not homogeneous seasonal usage foraging areas linkage with climatic-oceanographic conditions migratory routes Cordell Bank Kuletz and Irons 2007

8 Science: Tracking Ocean Wanderers Images courtesy of BirdLife International Images Courtesy of: Hatfield Marine Science Center, Oregon State University and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

9 Science: Impact of Fisheries nature of interactions direct (bycatch; food subsidies) indirect (prey depletion, availability) type and location population-level impact? Foraging areas Habitat usage Fisheries activity and location Spatio-temporal overlap

10 Science: Whats Needed Photo by Peter LaTourrette international national coordination of at-sea monitoring continent-wide seabird monitoring database monitoring programs to improve understanding of seabird population dynamics and trends assess the risk of seabird interactions in particular fisheries education and promotion designed to increase awareness and to stimulate solutions

11 Policy: Bycatch & Other Threats Variety of Measures Available Authorities, Means –Migratory Bird Treaties –Endangered Species Laws –Fisheries Management Laws –Environmental Statues –Protected Areas Legislation –International Instruments Short-Tailed Albatross by Yuri Artkuhin

12 Policy: International Instruments 1990 UN global driftnet ban and 1995 FAO Code of Conduct 1999 FAO International Plan of Action – Seabirds National Plans of Action: Assess, mitigate, and plan future research Seven nations (and Taiwan) have NPOAs Implementation varies FAO and BLI will soon assist in the development of best practices guidelines 2004 Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels Ongoing action within the RFMOs

13 Policy: Whats Needed Collaborate and coordinate efforts internationally, within an overall seabird conservation framework Address seabird needs and threats through education, capacity-building, and partnership as well as regulatory or intergovernmental mechanisms Establish an alliance which brings together the organizations and instruments in a holistic, integrated approach.

14 Thank You Photo Courtesy of Juan Fernandez Island Conservancy


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