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1 PROGRAMME FOR INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA (PIDA) ITU Regional Development Forum 9-11 May 2012, Kigali, Rwanda Dr Zouli BONKOUNGOU, African Union.

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Presentation on theme: "1 PROGRAMME FOR INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA (PIDA) ITU Regional Development Forum 9-11 May 2012, Kigali, Rwanda Dr Zouli BONKOUNGOU, African Union."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 PROGRAMME FOR INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA (PIDA) ITU Regional Development Forum 9-11 May 2012, Kigali, Rwanda Dr Zouli BONKOUNGOU, African Union COMMISSION, Addis Ababa 1 African Development Bank Group African Union NEPAD

2 2 CONTENT I.WHY PIDA II.WHAT IS PIDA III.PIDA STUDY PROGRESS. IV.PIDA OUTCOMES : ECONOMIC OUTLOOK V.DIAGNOSIS FOR TELECOM/ICT SECTOR VI. OUTLOOK FOR TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR VII. STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMM/ICT SECTOR VIII.PRIORITY ACTION PLAN (PAP) IX.PIDA CHALLENGES X. CONCLUSION

3 3 I: WHY PIDA?- Merging Continental Initiatives on Infrastructure Development Decision to merge all initiatives Terms of Reference by Sector (Transport, Energy, ICT & Water) Lessons learnt from AUC Studies & NEPAD MLTSF Joint Working Group AU Commission, NEPAD Sec., AfDB Project management plan

4 4 I: WHY PIDA? Rationale for the merger Common platform for infrastructure development in Africa Rationalisation of a plethora of regional/continental initiatives Harmonise donor intervention Fast tracking Africa development and integration

5 5 Major Components Supporting Components II: WHAT IS PIDA? PIDA is : a program dedicated to facilitating continental integration, socioeconomic development and trade, through improved regional infrastructure, a Multi sector program with several components Panel of experts Database Energy Transport Water Telecom/ ICT Sector Studies

6 6 II: WHAT IS PIDA? : Objectives and Outputs A Strategic Framework for 2040 Implementation strategy & process OutputsObjectives Infrastructure Development Programme (2040) Vision on Africas infrastructure Strategic objectives Sector policies(enabling environment to support infrastructure development) Regional and continental physical infrastructure projects Priority projects and measures Phases: Short term ( ), Medium term ( ) and Long term ( ) Rolling plan of priority actions Financing Monitoring & Evaluation process

7 7 Submission of INCEPTION REPORT 5th July 2010 Submission of Methodological Brief 15 September Submission of Phase I Report 30 March 2011 Submission of Sector Briefs 15 June 2011 Kick-Off Workshop, Addis Ababa July 2010 Validation Workshop, Johannesburg Sept 2010 Phase I Workshop, Libreville April 2010 Review Workshop, Tunis 7 & 8 July 2011 Submission of Phase II reports 15 September 2011 Regional Workshops, Sept-Oct Nairobi, Libreville, Abuja, Yamoussoukro, Rabat Submission of Phase III reports (Final Phase II Sectors reports incorporating Regional Workshops Comments, PIDA Study Synthesis), November 2011 III: PIDA STUDY PROCESS: STUDY STRUCTURE PHASES AND MEETINGS. PHASE III CONSENSUS BUILDING 7

8 8 DIAGNOSIS AFRICA OUTLOOK 2040 STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK 2040 RECS MASTER PLANS OTHER EXISTING PROJECTS III.PIDA STUDY PROCESS 8

9 9 IV:PIDA OUTCOMES: ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Economic outlook driven by population growth

10 10 IV:PIDA OUTCOMES: ECONOMIC OUTLOOK PIDAs macro and sector outlooks to 2040 are grounded on a 6.2% annual overall rate of growth of African GDP. The main drivers of this growth are: Population: 1,033;1,400;1,770 millions respectively in 2010, 2025 and 2040; Increasing level of education; Technology absorption PIDA Economic Outlook- GDP projections to 2040

11 11 From GDP projections 2040 to Sector Forecasts IV:PIDA OUTCOMES: ECONOMIC OUTLOOK If the 6.2% average GDP growth is achieved: Power demand will increase at an average annual growth rate of nearly 6%. Transport volumes will increase 6–8 times, with a particularly strong increase of up to 14 times for some landlocked countries… Water needs will push some river basins - including the Nile, Niger, Orange and Volta basins - to the ecological brink. ICT demand will swell by a factor of 20 before 2020 as Africa catches up with broadband. THIS INCREASED DEMAND WILL REQUIRE ADEQUATE REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE THAT PIDA PROPOSES

12 12 In 3 years ( ), a move from a scarce and expensive resource to overflow of bandwidth, Migration from satellite to submarine cables, Availability of much more bandwidth for countries with submarine stations, Price reduction, International bandwidth is sufficient, along African coasts in term of: Quantity, Number of landing stations. L The worldwide Broad band challenge: high speed broadband Union Europe (27 countries) - « Digital Startegy for Europe 2020" South Korea: National 1Gbps Network for end users in2012 Japon : e-Japan Priority Policy" Singapore: New Generation National Broadband Network Australie: National Broadband Network Nouvelle-Zélande: Initiative ultra High speed Canada : National Broadband policy ; Brésil: Plano Banda Larga National Argentine: Argentina Conectada; Nigeria: Vision 20:2020 V:DIAGNOSIS OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

13 13 Principal bottleneck identifiedImpact on terrestrial Infrastructure development and usage Response African countries have FO infrastructure but unequally developed and insufficient quantity and quality High costs for use, insufficient capacity in some cases drives demand for deployment of new competitive or open access infrastructure Data gathering, identification of needed new infrastructure Wireless infrastructure is not able to handle broadband without upgrades to fibre for backhaul Congestion on mobile data networks results in increased demand for pervasive low- cost/open access national fibre backbones to provide backhaul for base stations Deployment of pervasive open-access or competitive national backbones to service wireless base station needs. Interconnectivity is unequal with low levels of competition High prices, poor performance and congestion restricts use of existing domestic networks Develop/ adopt SMP determinations and interconnection regulations, introduce more competitors, at wholesale and retail levels International connectivity weakness and monopoly on international gateways in some countries High prices, poor performance and congestion restricts use of some existing international networks, limits usage, driving demand for regulatory reform Develop/ adopt SMP determinations, introduce more competitors, at wholesale and international level No uniform definition of needed regional infrastructures and difficulty to implement on a competitive basis Lack of low cost means for carrying inter- country traffic within Africa, or for obtaining access to competing submarine cables in nearby countries, a particular problem for land-locked countries. Develop and adopt regional infrastructure identification and planning guidelines, charter for landlocked countries V:DIAGNOSIS OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

14 14 Principal bottleneck identifiedImpact on terrestrial Infrastructure development and usage Response Lack of official data on market development and infrastructure Inability to make timely plans for infrastructure deployment leading to unexpected capacity constraints Develop a national data gathering and monitoring process International bandwidth is available in sufficient quantity on a competitive basis from submarine cables, but accessibility, interconnection and competition are insufficient Lack of low cost international capacity limits demand for regional and national infrastructure. Develop/ adopt SMP determinations, introduce more competitors, at wholesale and international level Obtaining rights of way for laying fibre cable is a long, costly and often difficult process Cross-border and national backbone deployment is delayed and rights of way costs create additional end-user costs. Develop land-use planning guidelines and regulations for national and cross-border infrastructure Implementation of cross-border links are a long and complicated process Cross-border and national backbone deployment is delayed and permitting costs create additional end-user costs, Develop land-use planning guidelines and regulations for cross-border infrastructure Alternative passive infrastructure (transport, energy, pipeline) is not available for ICT usage, especially as a competitor or alternative to existing links, transport and energy sectors Reduction of availability of potential infrastructure and low deployment of new or alternative links by operators leading to more limited choices and higher costs to end-users Awareness raising, develop cross-sectoral data gathering, planning and GIS systems for decision-making V:DIAGNOSIS OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

15 15 While the overall availability of international and cross-continental capacity via submarine cables is sufficient and encouraging, the national and regional infrastructure is insufficient to take advantage of the submarine capacity, Only about 0.5Tbps (2.7%) of the 18Tbps of submarine capacity is available is currently in use on the continent. V:DIAGNOSIS OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

16 16 The map below shows the major terrestrial infrastructure in use by African operators (or under construction – i.e. in place by 2012) V:DIAGNOSIS OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

17 17 Outlook 2030 The figure below illustrates the expected explosion of capacity required to service Africas broadband demand in the coming decade VI:OUTLOOK FOR TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

18 18 THE VISION : To enable Africa to build an information society and an integrated digital economy (e-Africa 2025) in which every government, business and citizen has access to reliable and affordable ICT networks by: Doubling ICTs contribution to GDP from 5% to 10% by 2025 Satisfying African broadband demand at the least cost, while increasing accessibility and security of access Promoting intra-African e-commerce Increasing physical integration at the regional and continental levels. supporting peace & security. Objectives : Increase ICT contribution to GDP from 5% to 10 % by 2025, Satisfied the demand at low cost while ensuring access to all African countries to the e-World ; Secure connectivity and promote intra-Africa e-commerce, Increase accessibility for all Africans to local, regional, continental and international content and applications Contribute to regional and continental physical and economic integration, VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

19 19 Goals to reach the Vision – The Master Plan Guarantee of international access : Each country needs to have fibre access to at least two different submarine cables Guarantee of secure terrestrial routes : Each country needs to have access to its choice of submarine landing stations by at least two different terrestrial infrastructures Landlocked Countries charter : Land locked countries need to have guaranteed access to landing submarine landing stations in coastal countries Continental inter-connectivity : Each country shall be interconnected with terrestrial fibre infrastructure to its neighbour based on the most economic criteria Optimal International bandwidth use : Each country shall have a national IXP to ensure local interconnection between national operators to reduce the level of external interconnection Competitive open markets: Each country should have a competitive market in broadband services based on a combination of private and public infrastructure provided on an open access non-discriminatory approach Sustainable new infrastructure : all new infrastructure needs to be have sufficient capacity (fibres) to support the medium term vision (more than 10 years) VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

20 20 Summary of Actions required to meet the goals Short term responses: (in parallel): In the short term, there are massive benefits to be gained simply by improving access to what is existing. This requires: 1.Efficient use of existing infrastructure. This will require creating an enabling policy/regulatory environment (especially through price regulation and non- discriminatory access requirements on SMPs) for: Optimising the use of existing telecommunications fibre (reducing costs and providing access to all operators) and Ensuring access to alternative infrastructure (transport/energy); 2.Connecting the priority missing links between countries and to submarine landing stations where needed. 3.Increasing national demand – opening markets to new access providers, establishing national traffic exchange points (IXPs), lowering ICT taxes and license/spectrum fees, supporting extension of national/international backbones to remote and rural areas (PPP/reverse auction), deploying fibre on alternative infrastructure 4.Establishing a more conducive environment for future fibre deployments. VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

21 21 Summary of Actions required to meet the goals Short term responses: (in parallel): 5.Deploying domestic satellite infrastructure to improve backbone reliability where there is only one fibre link, for broadcasting, and to fill the gaps in rural broadband coverage, especially in the remote areas where it may be many years before terrestrial infrastructure becomes available. 6.Supporting local and international content hosting and applications development – in particular e-government applications Medium term ( ): 1.Once the national enabling policy environments and institutional frameworks are in place, support new projects for regional and international fibre along major routes, especially where there is only one link 2.Improve availability of electricity for use in ICTs, especially in rural areas 3.Improve literacy levels nationally where needed Long term ( ): More national routes and more competition on existing routes, especially from access to ducts of new transborder road and energy projects, locations mainly driven by market demand for capacity and resiliency VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

22 22 SELECTION OF PROJECTS VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

23 23 CONTINENTAL STRATEGIC ICT INFRASTRUCTURE THIS MAP SHOWS THE TARGET NETWORK ENSURING ACCESS TO ALL STAKEHOLDERS WITH QUALITY, SECURITY, AND HIGH LEVEL OF AVAILABILITY BY 2020 INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

24 24 Continental Strategic ICT Infrastructure: Belt Interconnection by 2020 INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

25 25 IXP MAP BY 2020 THE MAP IDENTIFIES EXISTING AND NEEDED IXPS ON THE CONTINENT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

26 26 Transform Africa into an e- society Satisfy African broadband demand – at least cost Increase accessibility and security of access for all country Provide uniformly accessible services to develop social and regional integration Cpclusion: Enable an information society and integrated digital economy in which all actors have access to reliable and affordable ICT networks VII: STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK OF TELECOMMUNICATION/ICT SECTOR

27 27 24 transport 15 energy 9 TWR 3 ICT For all the 4 sector PIDA PAP broken down into 51 projects/programs selected according to agreed criteria VIII:PRIORITY ACTION PLAN (PAP)

28 28 PIDA PAP Programme TitleSummary Description Stage Total cost in Million USD LocationRECSREGION ICT 1 ICT Enabling Environment This programme would improve the environment for the private sectors to invest in high speed broadband infrastructure S226 Continental 2 Access to landing stations ECCAS Strengthening acces to landing station and interconnecting countries 85 REC MembersECCASCENTRAL 3 Ensuring land infrastructure Ensuring land infrastructure, ending isolation of the CAR 12 CARECCASCENTRAL 4 Ending isolation of landlock countries Ending isolation of landlock countries, 2 nd exit of Chad and CAR 7 Chad, CARECCASCENTRAL 5 Access to landing stations ECOWAS Strengthening acces to landing station and interconnecting countries 91 REC MembersECOWASWESTERN 6 Link Mali - Niger - Nigeria Creation of the backbone Mopti (Mali) - Niamey (Niger) - Zinder (Niger) - Nigeria 52 Mali, Niger, NigeriaECOWASWESTERN 7 Strengthening Burkina Faso - Benin - Niger connectivity Creation of the backbone Burkina Faso - Benin - Niger 10 Burkina Faso, Benin, NigerECOWASWESTERN 8 Link Sudan - Djibouti Creation of the backbone Khartoum (Sudan) - Asmara (Eritrea) - Djibouti 36 Sudan, Eritrea, DjiboutiCOMESA, IGADEASTERN 9 Link Sud Sudan - Uganda Creation of the backbone Juba (Sud-Sudan) - Kampala (Uganda) 14 Sud-Sudan, UgandaCOMESA, IGAD, EACEASTERN 10 Link Somalia - Kenya Creation of the backbone Mogadiscio (Somalia) - Nairobi (Kenya) 12 Somalia, KenyaCOMESA, IGAD, EACEASTERN 11 Link Angola - Burundi Creation of the backbone Angola - Zambia - DR Congo - Bujumbura (Burundi) 12 Angola, Zambia, DRC, BurundiCOMESA, SADC, ECCAS, EACCENTRAL 12 Link Mauritanie - Libya Submarine backbone Mauritania - Morocco - Algeria - Tunisia - Libya using submarine cable to "skirt" political problems in the Region. The link can be easily extended to Egypt and Senegal. 203 REC membersUMANORTHERN 13 ICT Terresterial Connectivity in synergy with other sectors Continental land infrastructure to realize in medium term (2020 in synergy with Transport and Energy sectors S3500 Continental 14 Carrier to carrier project ECOWAS Extension of alternative infrastructure and implementation of a carrier to carrier in Benin, Togo, Ghana. 60 Benin, Togo, GhanaECOWASWESTERN 15 Carrier to carrier project ECOWAS-UMA Setting up alternative infrastructure in 16 countries (UMA - ECOWAS) and extablshing a carrier to carrier 300 REC MembersUMA/ECOWASWESTERN 16 Internet Exchange Point (IXP) programme Setting up IXPs in the countries where they are not available and strengthening when necessary. S313 Continental 1,434 *modernisation of selected corridors means efficiency and capacity gains through Trade Facilitation, OSBPs, Capacity enhancement possibly through PPP Capacity enhancement includes Bypasses of urban areas, passing lanes, road widening. VIII:PRIORITY ACTION PLAN (PAP)

29 29 PAP Investment Cost: $68 bn BY SECTOR BY REGION VIII:PRIORITY ACTION PLAN (PAP): INVESTMENT COST

30 30 PAP Investment ($68 bn) Less than 0,2% of 2011 GDP, or 1% of national budgets, or 5% of Investment budgets AMBITIOUS BUT AFFORDABLE Mainly from domestic sources (50% in 20 to 75% in 40) Private sector, ICA members & emerging partners RESOURCE MOBILIZATION Needs are estimated to 5 - 8% of total investment cost PROJECT PREPARATION VIII:PRIORITY ACTION PLAN (PAP): INVESTMENT COST

31 31 IX:PIDA CHALLENGES IAIDA defines responsibilities of Continental, Regional institutions (AUC, NPCA, RECs) and Member States. Builds on principles of subsidiarity. Allows high level advocacy. Provides a mechanism for reviewing performance and rolling over the PAP with access to the highest levels of the AU, RECs and Member States. Operationalization of Institutional Architecture (IAIDA) for PIDA Implementation

32 32 IAIDA

33 33 Financing will need to come mostly from domestic sources (public & private ) Domestic Bond Markets, inc. remittances Sovereign Wealth Funds Enabling environment for more private participation PUBLICMIXPRIVATE IX:PIDA CHALLENGE S Country role in PIDA implementation Projects are implemented by countries on whose territory they are located and by their agencies (public or private) Countries are critical and efficient players Implement soft components (harmonisation of continental and regional policies) Financing project preparation, capital investment, operation and maintenance

34 34 X:CONCLUSION Unique example of multi sector and Actors Initiative PIDA is a continental integrated program for the FOUR sectors PIDA is based on a large consultative and consensual approach with all stakeholders PIDA has benefited from the support of the international community PIDA generated a momentum for the resources mobilization G8-20; TICAD-JAPAN, CHINA-FOCA; EU, BRAZIL.. PIDA is a great opportunity for the international and African private sectors as well as the building of efficient PPP PIDA Impacts Competitiveness would be established in niche markets and in a growing spectrum of mainstream activities, including agriculture and manufacturing Regional trade would be twice todays share of continental GDP Up to 15 million new jobs would be created.

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