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Mobile Broadband: Spectrum Needs and Harmonization Veena Rawat VP, Ambassador to the ITU Research In Motion.

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Presentation on theme: "Mobile Broadband: Spectrum Needs and Harmonization Veena Rawat VP, Ambassador to the ITU Research In Motion."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mobile Broadband: Spectrum Needs and Harmonization Veena Rawat VP, Ambassador to the ITU Research In Motion

2 Private and public partnership for mobile broadband access Radio frequency spectrum is an essential resource for wireless access networks Developing national mobile broadband capabilities is an area of high priority for many administrations –Assign spectrum for the greatest national benefit –A key policy element is to provide access to broadband networks in rural and remote areas Mobile broadband can provide wireless access for rural and remote areas –New mobile broadband technologies, such as LTE, can provide traditional fixed access and as well as new mobile applications in rural and remote areas Spectrum harmonization (local, regional and globally) is the key component for mobile broadband networks to achieve benefits of economies of scale and increase spectrum efficiency

3 Mobile broadband technology for high capacity and large coverage Technology is ready for flexible and large spectrum use –LTE-Advanced can support up to 100 MHz aggregated spectrum for high data rate and high user capacity –Contiguous spectrum is preferred to take advantage of this technology Peak data rate for LTE-Advanced system (FDD) (based on spectral efficiency as submitted to ITU-R from 3GPP) Spatial multiplexing Spectral efficiency (bit/s/Hz) Bandwidth 5 MHz10 MHz20 MHz40 MHz80 MHz Downlink 4 layer Mbps163 Mbps326 Mbps652 Mbps1.2 Gbps 8 layer Mbps306 Mpbs612 Mbps1.2 Gbps2.4 Gbps Uplink 2 layer Mbps84 Mbps168 Mbps336 Mbps672 Mbps 4 layer Mbps168 Mbpz336 Mbps672 Mbps1.3Gbps Large spectrum bandwidth is also a tool to extend cell coverage – advantage for rural – For the same data rate, link budget is improved by transmitting on larger bandwidth with more power efficient modulation/coding scheme, e.g. QPSK and/or lower code rate. The challenge is the implementation of multiple spectrum bands, especially in the user equipment – Multiple bands and carrier aggregation increase the complexity of RF front-end – Contiguous spectrum is preferred Note 2: 3GPP Rel-10/11 specifications(LTE-Advanced), operation band can be up 5x20MHz total spectrum by aggregating 5 carriers, each of which can be up to 20 MHz bandwidth

4 Implementation complexity of handset/smartphone Support legacy cellular bands –GSM/PCS/AWS/CDMA More than 30 band classes defined for LTE –With Intra-band or inter-band carrier aggregation Co-exist with other radio bands –WiFi/Bluetooth/GPS/NFC Spectrum harmonization required to reduce device implementation complexity E-UTRA(LTE) operating bands

5 Technologies and Bands Mobile phones are required to support a wide range of wireless technologies Users prefer a single device for access to all services In most devices, diversity antennas are a minimum and five or more antenna sets are generally needed in a smart phone. NFC BT WLAN/WiMax GPS Diversity GSM UMTS EDGE WCDMA CDMA EVDO LTE GSM UMTS EDGE WCDMA CDMA EVDO Diversity (MHz)13.56

6 Antenna Placement in the Handset WiFI Main Bluetooth & GPS 4G Diversity Where to put multiple antennas? Distance between PCB/bracket and antenna should be >3mm (BT, GPS, WiFi and WiMax); for low bands it should be even higher. Space under antenna element should be clear of any shields, flexes, or components Large batteries limit the space allocated for the antennas. Components (such as shield cans, speaker, camera) may be directly behind the antennas. Smart phone also includes NFC Challenges

7 Spectrum Harmonization for mobile broadband For the near term, the following spectrum is under consideration for mobile broadband and must be harmonized: –Digital Dividend 600/700/800 MHz –Remaining part of 1710 – 2200 MHz –2500 – 2690 MHz

8 Digital Dividend in Region 2 RR(WRC-12) Region 2 (MHz) Countries in Region 2 support MOBILE as primary service RR(WRC-12) Region 3 (MHz) BROADCASTING Fixed Mobile Argentina, Canada, Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, the United States, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela FIXED MOBILE BROADCASTING BROADCASTING Canada, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, the United States, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica and Mexico FIXED MOBILE BROADCASTING RADIONAVIGATION RADIO ASTRONOMY Mobile-satellite except aeronautical mobile-satellite (Earth-to-space) FIXED MOBILE 5.313A MOD 5.317A BROADCASTING BROADCASTING Fixed Mobile A Canada, Chile, Cuba, the United States, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Peru MOBILE 5.313B MOD 5.317A BROADCASTING Fixed A 5.313B Mobile is secondary in Brazil

9 1710 – 2200 MHz MOBILEMSS MSS 2025 – 2110 MHz EESS/SPACE/FIXED/mobile FIXED / MOBILE MSS FIXED MOBILE R2 Canadian Frequency Allocation: C37 (CAN-06) The designation of the bands MHz, MHz and MHz for Advanced Wireless Services may be the subject of a future public consultation. AWS PCS LE-PCS MSS 2025 – 2110 MHz EESS/SPACE/FIXED/mobile AWS MSS 2000 MOBILE 2180 Canadian MSS

10 MHz 2500 LTE band 7 FDD - UL LTE band 38 TDD LTE band 7 FDD - DL ITU options for Band Plan 3GPP/LTE Band Plan

11 Harmonization and WRC-15 WRC-15 provides the next opportunity for harmonization at regional and global level –Agenda Item 1.1 to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in accordance with Resolution COM6/8 (WRC-12); –Agenda Item 1.2 to examine the results of ITU-R studies, in accordance with Resolution COM5/10(WRC-12), on the use of the frequency band MHz by the mobile, except aeronautical mobile, service in Region 1 and take the appropriate measures;

12 Summary Mobile broadband enabled by the current technology and has the advantage and flexibility to provide services and applications to wide range of regions, including rural and remote areas Spectrum harmonization is the necessity for mobile broadband Mobile broadband access prefers contiguous spectrum Preparation for WRC-15 provides is opportunity to align harmonization and additional spectrum for mobile broadband

13 Backup

14 Digital Dividend in Region 2 Region 2 (MHz) Different category of service: in Mexico, the allocation of the band MHz to the fixed and mobile services, and in Argentina, Uruguay and Venezuela to the mobile service, is on a primary basis (see No. 5.33), subject to agreement obtained under No (WRC 07) MOD Different category of service: in Canada, Chile, Cuba, the United States, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama and Peru, the allocation of the bands MHz and MHz to the fixed service is on a primary basis (see No. 5.33), subject to agreement obtained under No In Canada, Chile, Cuba, the United States, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama and Peru, the allocation of the bands MHz and MHz to the mobile service is on a primary basis (see No. 5.33), subject to agreement obtained under No In Argentina and Ecuador, the allocation of the band MHz to the fixed and mobile services is on a primary basis (see No. 5.33), subject to agreement obtained under No (WRC 12) Additional allocation: in Canada, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, the United States, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica and Mexico, the band MHz is also allocated to the fixed and mobile services on a primary basis, subject to agreement obtained under No (WRC 07) Different category of service: in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Honduras, the allocation of the band MHz to the fixed service is on a primary basis (see No. 5.33), subject to agreement obtained under No B Different category of service: in Brazil, the allocation of the band MHz to the mobile service is on a secondary basis (see No. 5.32). (WRC 07) MOD 5.317A Those parts of the band MHz in Region 2 and the band MHz in Regions 1 and 3 which are allocated to the mobile service on a primary basis are identified for use by administrations wishing to implement International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) – see Resolutions 224 (Rev.WRC 12) and 749 (Rev.WRC 12), as appropriate. This identification does not preclude the use of these bands by any application of the services to which they are allocated and does not establish priority in the Radio Regulations. (WRC 12)

15 APT band plan

16 C37 (CAN-06) The designation of the bands MHz, MHz and MHz for Advanced Wireless Services may be the subject of a future public consultation AWS -1 PCS AWS UPCS AWS-3 AWS – 2110 MHz EESS/SPACE/FIXED/mobile Under review(NTIA/FCC) for mobile broadband 2180 US 16 AWS PCS LE-PCS MSS 2025 – 2110 MHz EESS/SPACE/FIXED/mobile AWS MSS 2000 MOBILE 2180 Canadian MSS MOBILEMSS MSS 2025 – 2110 MHz EESS/SPACE/FIXED/mobile FIXED/ MOBILE MSS FIXED MOBILE R2 Notes: The spectrum for further authorization can be assigned as PCS/AWS extension Band plans for these spectrum should maintain the existing technical condition and minimize the implementation complexity of handset Mexico AWS: MHz/ MHz(60+60 MHz) Peru AWS: MHz/ MHz(60+60 MHz)

17 MHz

18 18 Canadian Band plan ECC Band plan US Band plan

19 Where to put the antennas and radios? back Space for battery SIM connector Antenna connectors e.g. Smart Phone c Note: individual antennas may support multiple service bands


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