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Towards IPCC 2006 GLs - changes and improvements in the methodologies for the Waste Sector EU Workshop on Waste 2-3 May 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Towards IPCC 2006 GLs - changes and improvements in the methodologies for the Waste Sector EU Workshop on Waste 2-3 May 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 Towards IPCC 2006 GLs - changes and improvements in the methodologies for the Waste Sector EU Workshop on Waste 2-3 May 2006

2 Riitta Pipatti2 May Contents 2006 IPCC Guidelines - Waste volume: Solid waste treatment and disposal solid waste disposal sites biological treatment Wastewater treatment and discharge Incineration and open burning of waste This presentation: changes and improvements to 1996 GLs and GPG 2000

3 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste treatment and disposal Recycling and reuse biological treatment (composting, anaerobic digestion) mechanical-biological treatment (MB, MBT) solid waste disposal (landfills) incineration and open burning of waste

4 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste treatment and disposal Recycling and reuse biological treatment (composting, anaerobic digestion) mechanical-biological treatment (MB, MBT) solid waste disposal (landfills) incineration and open burning of waste Included in the IPCC 1996 GLs

5 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste treatment and disposal Recycling and reuse biological treatment (composting, anaerobic digestion) mechanical-biological treatment (MB, MBT) solid waste disposal (landfills) incineration and open burning of waste Included in the IPCC 2006 GLs

6 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste treatment and disposal Recycling and reuse biological treatment (composting, anaerobic digestion) mechanical-biological treatment (MB, MBT) solid waste disposal (landfills) incineration and open burning of waste Included in the IPCC 2006 GLs Separate chapter

7 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste treatment and disposal Recycling and reuse biological treatment (composting, anaerobic digestion) mechanical-biological treatment (MB, MBT) solid waste disposal (landfills) incineration and open burning of waste Options and combinations many - challenges in developing default methodologies and default factors

8 Riitta Pipatti2 May Data Collection for solid waste treatment and disposal Waste generation, management and disposal by region/country Municipal solid waste, industrial amounts (per capita) waste compostion degradable organic and fossil carbon content composition changes during treatment

9 Riitta Pipatti2 May Example of a waste stream Paper Waste GENERATION (total 1000 ton) (Mois. 200 ton) (DOC 400 ton) STREAM A (composting) (total 100 >> 78 ton) (Mois. 20 >> 30 ton) (DOC 40 >>8 ton) STREAM B (incineration) (total 200 >> 20 ton) (Mois. 20 >> 5 ton) (DOC 40 >>0 ton) STREAM C (direct landfillingland filling) (total 200 >> 195 ton) (Mois. 20 >> 15 ton) (DOC 40 >> 40 ton) RESOURCE RECOVERY (total 500 ton) (Mois. 100 ton) (DOC 200 ton) SWDS (total 293 ton, Mois. 50 ton and DOC 48 ton)

10 Riitta Pipatti2 May Data Collection for solid waste treatment and disposal Waste composition - waste fractions paper/cardboard garden/parkwaste textiles wood rubber/leather food waste plastic ash, inerts, other metal glass

11 Riitta Pipatti2 May Data Collection for solid waste treatment and disposal Updated values for degradable organic content in the waste fractions (default in wet and dry waste, ranges) data also on industrial waste generation in some countries a table with default values for composition and carbon content in industrial waste by industry type to be developed in Second Order Draft Activity data collection addressed both under solid waste treatment and disposal (general) and the management/treatment options (specific)

12 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste disposal sites (landfills) Methodological issues for estimation of CH 4 emissions use of the mass balance method discouraged Tier 1 First order decay method developed equation in GPG2000 improved (more precise and easy to use: step by step guidance and spreadsheets provided) provides also an estimate on carbon stored in the landfill (check for HWP) Tier 1a - waste composition FOD model Tier 1b - site-type dependent FOD model

13 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste disposal sites (landfills) Tier 2 - as Tier 1 but using key country-specific data (waste disposal data for at least 10 years, DOC or L o ) Tier 3 - typically based on high-quality site-specific measurements or modelling

14 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste disposal sites (landfills) Choice of activity data historical data for more than 50 years (default) extrapolation using population data, economic or other indicators drivers MSW - default population or urban population, depending on availability of data Industrial waste - industrial production by industry type, or GDP, depending on availability of data Reference to statistics with population and GDP data given

15 Riitta Pipatti2 May Solid waste disposal sites (landfills) Parameters: improved guidance and/or updated values methane correction factor - default also for semi-aerobic sites half-life (instead of decay rate) - more transparent and easy to understand by climate zone (dry and wet climates separately) and by waste compostion or site type (managed - unmanaged deep - unmanaged shallow)

16 Riitta Pipatti2 May Biological treatment Methodology for CH 4 and N 2 O emissions composting and anaerobic digestion (with energy recovery to be reported in the Energy Sector Simple equation CH 4 or N 2 O Emissions = M i EF ij default emission factors derived from a limited number of literature (to be improved in the SOD) MB treatment - emissions depending on application (no default method or EFs) - assumes no emissions during separation

17 Riitta Pipatti2 May Incineration and open burning of waste CO 2 (from fossil carbon in waste), N 2 O and CH 4 from incineration and open burning of waste Tiers - consistent with other sources Waste composition and fossil carbon content EFs for both wet and dry weight

18 Riitta Pipatti2 May Incineration and open burning of waste open burning - important in developing countries (developed countries?) default: population whose waste is not collected is assumed to burn their waste (rural population) in a region where urban population exceeds 80% - assumtion that no open burning of waste occurs

19 Riitta Pipatti2 May Incineration and open burning of waste N 2 O and CH 4 emissions - dependent on technology and combustion/burning conditions CH 4 - usually small or negligible in incineration - included for completeness and consistency with the Energy Sector open burning of waste - more significant emissions N 2 O - temperature, N-content of fuels,

20 Riitta Pipatti2 May Waste water treatment and discharge (disposal) CH 4 and N 2 O emissions from domestic (municipal) and industrial waste water simplified methodology - wastewater and sludge together in the methodology (sludge removed subtracted - guidance on emissions from disposal or use in agriculture addressed under these sector/categories) improved tier-structure for CH4 emissions CH 4 only from main industrial sectors updated default parameters examples how to estimate emissions

21 Riitta Pipatti2 May General for all sectors - indirect CO 2 and N 2 O emissions Indirect CO 2 - from NMVOC and CH 4 emissions from fossil sources (combustion - oxidation factors include also indirect CO 2 ) => not relevant for the waste sector (incomplete combustion especially for open burning of waste)? NO x and NH 3 emissions - source of indirect N 2 O emissions due from nitrogen deposition => some emissions from biological treatment, wastewater and SWDSs (importance small; methodology for the NO x and NH 3 emissions in CORAIR Guidebook )

22 Riitta Pipatti2 May Summary Evolution - not revolution: methodological improvements and better default data SWDS - FOD method to be used by all - improved comparability and user-friendliness Biological treatment - complements the guidance, emissions estimated to be small Open burning of waste - important for especially for developing countriess First Order Draft on the Waste Volume in 2006 GLs - needs still improvements (e.g. default values and consistency among the chapters)

23 Riitta Pipatti2 May Gls - next steps Consideration of comments from the expert review in July (Lead Author meeting in Moscow) Government and Expert Review September - October Consideration of comments in December Final draft for IPCC approval in spring 2006


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