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INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR Douglas K. R. Robinson teQnode SARL, 75005 Paris, France & Centre de Gestion Scientifique.

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Presentation on theme: "INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR Douglas K. R. Robinson teQnode SARL, 75005 Paris, France & Centre de Gestion Scientifique."— Presentation transcript:

1 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR Douglas K. R. Robinson teQnode SARL, Paris, France & Centre de Gestion Scientifique (C.G.S.), Ecole des Mines, Paris The 4th International Seville Conference on Future-Oriented Technology Analysis (FTA) 12 & 13 May 2011 Tilo Propp Independent researcher, Gouda, the Netherlands

2 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node A TRAILER See FTA website for feature length edition Aims of presentation To give a glimpse (without too many SPOILERS) of the paper Entice you to read the paper (popcorn is not provided) To provoke first round comments

3 The paper FTA approaches need to be tailored, not only to project technology trajectories, but to speculate (in a controlled way) how the socio-technical landscape (the various environments and framing conditions that will shape future innovation journeys) will evolve In this theme, Orienting innovation systems towards global challenges, the emphasis is shifted from promising technologies stemming from hype & hope in technoscience, a technocentric view where projections stem from a key enabling technology, towards a system, challenge or societal need (a multi-actor view) in which many technology options (and non-technological options) may provide solutions and can (in theory) be selected as the most suitable option. This places a real challenge on the FTA practitioner. On the one hand, trustworthy future-oriented technology analysis is our trade, projecting futures from the present, like trajectories that can be mapped and followed or avoided. On the other, we are now faced with understanding current and potential socio-technical landscapes where the technology options are part of entanglements in a multi-actor and multi-level arrangement. STARTING POINT NEED TO COUPLE PROMISING TECHNOLOGY WITH SOCIETAL NEEDS A CHALLENGE FOR FTA The first of two slides I shall read lots of text

4 The paper (2) Our interest was in near to mid-term grand challenges and thus look at the (co) evolution of the present socio-technical landscape with promising technologies into future socio-technical landscapes. We wanted an approach that could be modified for all those wishing to shape technology to meet societal challenges (policy makers, civil society orgs, citizen/consumers, entrepreneurs, large firms, proactive researchers etc.) Would allow the tracing of both de/re alignments of current socio- technical configurations Would include the different assessment worlds of the various actors/stakeholders. The second of two slides I shall read lots of text

5 The paper (3) MethodologiesObjectsOutcomesNature A Techno-organizational mappingActors, activitiesInnovation chain: actual horizontal and vertical links and emerging chains being linked, as supply chains, into the X, Y, Z chain Descriptive B Rationales/ expectations mapping Endogenous futures (techno-centric; governance-centric) and enabling conditions +: Ongoing interactions in arenas of concern Descriptive C Social science analysis Functions of expectations; relationships between emerging and incumbent technologies +: Connections between technologies and grand challenges are mediated: they emerge from interactions between technically and socially enabling factors per future path Prospective We reviewed literature on approaches that could help us capture actors and activities, the connections between the present and the future and ways of assessment. Networks and systems (Innovation Systems, st-systems, value chains, etc.) Expectations, agendas and activities leading to entanglements and alignment Novelty creation and selection (evolutionary economics, enactor/selectors)

6 The paper (4) We see that these elements can be combined if you move away from a system of actors and activities To a system of arenas of technology production, novelty creation and selection mechanisms. Placing emphasis on: Organisational processes and entanglements (including sunk investments) Expectations of how the present will evolve into the future Assessment processes (innovation and selection regimes)

7 Innovation-Chain+ Each bubble represents an arena of activities, novelty creation and selection Depending on focus of analysis and FTA objective, can explore (1)Assessment processes (2) Innovation/design regime (3) expectations and agendas (4) alignments/lock-ins (5) actor mix (6) processes of interaction within and across arenas

8 MethodologiesObjectsOutcomesNature A Techno-organizational mapping Actors, activitiesInnovation chain: actual horizontal and vertical links and emerging chains being linked, as supply chains, into the X, Y, Z chain Descriptive B Rationales/ expectations mapping Endogenous futures (techno-centric; governance-centric) and enabling conditions +: Ongoing interactions in arenas of concern Descriptive C Social science analysis Functions of expectations; relationships between emerging and incumbent technologies +: Connections between technologies and grand challenges are mediated: they emerge from interactions between technically and socially enabling factors per future path Prospective

9 GLOBAL AGRIFOOD CHALLENGES 9 SUSTAINABILITY HUMAN HEALTH VULNERABILITY

10 THE AGRIFOOD SECTOR? What do we mean by 10

11 Food Packagin g Here is just one small segment of the food chain tracking the elements influencing food value chain from farm to fork. Food Value Chain Perspective

12 Food Packagin g Production Processing Packaging Distribution Roughly this breaks down it down into four overlapping areas Food Value Chain Perspective

13 Agricultural production Food ProcessingFood Packaging Food Distribution Nano forms of agro chemicals Nano carriers enabling genetic manipulation of crops and livestock Controlled release Nano- emulsions Nanofibers Nano- diagnostics Nano clays Packaging environment sensors Edible nano-coatings Bio-degradable packaging Nano RFID Nano bar codes Lots of nanoscale options Precision Agriculture Sustainable farming Water and nutrient control Functional foods Neutraceuticals Improved quality control Active packaging Flavour scalping reduction TrackingAuthentication Potentially enabling many macroscale technology applications Consumer mistrust of Agrotech (e.g. Aftermath of BSE and GMO in UK) Trend in disposal and convenience packaging reinforces end-of-life concerns Tracking and Privacy issues arising from track and trace technologies Concerns over labelling of ingredients in food, what system for nano? Specific like E- numbering system? Concern about food contact materials (i.e. Antibacterial agents) and migration Little clarity on what is novel food, and thus concern that lack of transparency when nano is in a product Enhanced absorption and bio- availability leads to questions on exposure in the gut (issue of mucosal and cellular translocation) Definition of novel food unclear. This inhibits labelling standards and thus product transparency Contamination of food through migration of nanoparticles from food packaging or active surfaces used in food processing. Risk and Hazards of environmental exposure Nano options and influence on food chain Quality and Safety Issues Societal and Governance issues Limited knowledge on toxicity of nano-formulations of existing agrochemicals which are designed to be be more reactive and more bioactive Consumer group concerns on dominance of fortified foods versus natural Longevity of nano-based pesticides in question by many environmental NGOs Nano fulfils many technical requirements, but other criteria must be met for the nano- enabled macroscale technology to be taken up and well embedded in society. Food Value Chain Perspective and NANO +

14 FOOD PACKAGING 14

15 The Driver for Green Packaging Packaging waste costs money and costs the environment Using figures just for the UK: Approximately 10.5 million tons of packaging enters the UK waste system every year (DEFRA report) More than half of this is related to food and drink The cost of the raw materials for this is about 4.5 billion Euros per year And this cost does not include disposal and recovery costs or wider social and environmental costs such as the accumulation of platicizers in underground water, or the production of dioxins by, for example, PVC and paper based packaging materials SO LETS GO GREEN?

16 Bio-based plastics with desirable properties Raw material from renewable sources What is the holy grail in green packaging? SUSTAINABLE, ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY & COMPETETIVE OPTIONS What is the holy grail in green packaging? SUSTAINABLE, ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY & COMPETETIVE OPTIONS Environmentally friendly during retail, consumption and waste management

17 Promising Technologies

18 Where does NANOTECHNOLOGY add value? Adapted diagram from: Ecobionanocomposites: A New Class of Green Materials, John R. Dorgan, Colorado School of Mines, Renewable Sources Processing NANO modification Biopolymer Traditionally biopolymers have suffered because of: Poor barrier properties Poor mechanical properties Processing many of these biopolymers into nanofibres and nanowhiskers or incorporating nanoadditives can augment barrier and mechanical properties of biopolymers.

19 Biodegradable and edible packaging Bionanocomposites When biopolymers (such as cellulose) are mixed with nanoclay particles, the resultant nanocomposites exhibit improved barrier properties compared with the pure polymer, and after their useful life can be composted and returned to the soil. Other nanomaterials can be used including nanoparticles, nanofibres and nanowhiskers. Bio-based nanofibres Many biopolymers such as chitosan, cellulose, collagen and zein (derived from corn) have been synthesised as nanofibres using high electrostatic potentials from various biopolymers via the electrospinning technique. Edible nano films Edible films are layers of digestible material used to coat food (edible coatings) or as a barrier between food and other materials or environments (edible films). Bionanocomposites created from vegetable and fruit puree and cellulose nanowhiskers have recently been developed. Proteins that can be used include casein, whey, collagen, egg white and fish derived protein. Soya bean, corn and wheat protein also are candidates for edible films producing proteins.

20 A reasonably well defined societal challenge & Lots of promising technologies We wanted to look at the landscapes innovation journeys would cross and co- evolve with to achieve this societal challenge

21 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node

22 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node

23 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node

24 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node

25 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node

26 Wrapping Up

27 MethodologiesObjectsOutcomesNature A Techno-organizational mapping Actors, activitiesInnovation chain: actual horizontal and vertical links and emerging chains being linked, as supply chains, into the X, Y, Z chain Descriptive B Rationales/ expectations mapping Endogenous futures (techno-centric; governance-centric) and enabling conditions +: Ongoing interactions in arenas of concern Descriptive C Social science analysis Functions of expectations; relationships between emerging and incumbent technologies +: Connections between technologies and grand challenges are mediated: they emerge from interactions between technically and socially enabling factors per future path Prospective

28 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node

29 INNOVATION-CHAIN+ APPROACH FOR THE NANO-ENABLED AGRIFOOD SECTOR te Q node Robinson D. K. R., Huang L., Guo Y. & Porter A. L. (In review 2011) Forecasting Innovation Pathways (FIP) NANOBIOSENSORS Van Merkerk & Robinson 2006 Technology Analysis and Strategic Management LAB-ON-A-CHIP Robinson & Propp nd FTA conf TF&SC on multipath mapping LAB-ON-A-CHIP Robinson 2010 PhD Thesis SIRNA DELIVERY Te Kulve 2011 PhD Thesis FOOD AND PHARMA Robinson D. K. R., Huang L., Guo Y. & Porter A. L. (In review 2011) Forecasting Innovation Pathways (FIP) DEEP BRAIN IMPLANTS Parandian PhD Thesis forthcoming 2011 LARGE AREA ELECTRONICS BODY AREA NETWORKS Robinson rd FTA Seminar 2009 TF&SC CO-EVOLUTIONARY SCENARIOS FOR NANO GOVERNANCE Elwyn et al 2011 Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice MEDICAL INFORMATICS FOR HEART DISEASE

30 Extra Slides

31 Locating worldwide nanobiosensor research over a base map of science (Database: SCI) See Lu Huang et al. After Lunch on Text Mining for Forecasting Innovation Pathways

32

33 THE NANOSCALE Putting into perspective 33

34 Putting the Nanoscale into perspective 34 Artificial structuresNatural structures

35 Putting the Nanoscale into perspective 35 Artificial structures Cheese to the nanoscale Cheese Cheese mites Fat Globules Casein micelles Milk Protein Bouwmeester et al. (2009) Reg. Tox. & Pharma


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