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Inclusive Toolkit for Universal Design 1 Reconstruction: Haiti for All in Long- Term Recovery Chapter 1 Physical Environment An Initiative of the GPDD.

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Presentation on theme: "Inclusive Toolkit for Universal Design 1 Reconstruction: Haiti for All in Long- Term Recovery Chapter 1 Physical Environment An Initiative of the GPDD."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Inclusive Toolkit for Universal Design 1 Reconstruction: Haiti for All in Long- Term Recovery Chapter 1 Physical Environment An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

3 2 Impact of the earthquake How do we build back better? Who is the User? 7 Principles of Universal Design Access to Water and Sanitation Outline Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti and the IDB

4 Total population in 2008: 9.78 million (Source: WDI) Lifetime Births per Woman (TFR): ~4 (Source: UNICEF) Population (thousands), 2008, under 5 = 1252 (Source: UNICEF) Population 65 years and over: 3.4% (male 120,040; female 188,690) –estimate (Source: CIA World Factbook) Estimated 7-8 % of the population had disabilities (WHO, NY Times), faced exclusion from social, economic, community participation 3 Pre-Earthquake Facts An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

5 People with Disabilities: Disproportionate impact due to inequities in rescue and response > 300,000 injured; resulting physical disabilities through amputations, spinal cord injuries, head trauma, multiple fractures, among other injuries Post-traumatic stress, psychosocial disabilities, and lack of adequate care Estimates put this number at greater than 450,000 Other issues: 1.3 million in temporary shelters; 500,000 left affected area ~500,000 children under the age of 5, ~200,00 pregnant and lactating women affected and at risk ~84,000 displaced individuals over 60 years of age High risk of violence for vulnerable groups including women and people with disabilities 4 Human Impact of Earthquake An IniAn Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti tiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

6 ~105,000 homes destroyed, > 208,000 damaged (PDNA, 2010) > 1,300 educational institutions completely destroyed, ~4,600 damaged (World Vision, 2010) Large number of hospitals and health centers have collapsed or considered unusable (PDNA, 2010) Majority of Government and Ministerial buildings destroyed (PDNA, 2010) Commercial buildings (~30,000), Transport facilities (air, land, water), community centers, entertainment venues damaged (Source for header: UN Photo by Logan Abassi) 5 Physical Impact of Earthquake An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

7 MINUSTAH office. Source: UN Photo by Sophia ParisDamaged Cathedral. Source: UN Photo by Marco Dormino Man outside the Haiti Tax Building. Source: UN Photo by Logan Abassi Collapsed School. Source: UN Photo by Logan Abassi An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti 6

8 To ensure that reconstruction : Does not become a reason for exclusion Narrows socio-economic inequities & promotes equal opportunities Is inclusive for all, including people with disabilities and the aging population Provides access to education, health, sustainable livelihoods, community living, political participation (e.g. voting), and public participation Facilitates inclusive disaster risk reduction and management 7 BETTER? Why to build back An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

9 To help the Government of Haiti meet its goals and obligations Haiti has ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD); Required to ensure that persons with disabilities can access their environment, transportation, public facilities and services, and information and communications technologies Disability is a cross-cutting issue in Haitis PRSP To meet key targets under Haitis Action Plan for Reconstruction and National Development 8 BETTER? Why to build back An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

10 Universal Design (UD) is a concept used to create environments, products, services, or information that respond to the widest range of the population possible It is far more cost-effective to modify the plans for a new building at the outset than to adapt an existing building to make it accessible Estimates put the cost at about 1% when incorporated at the start 9 Universal Design How to build back better? An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

11 Our first instinct is to design for ourselves. The majority of designers implicitly assume that users… Are young and able-bodied Are well-educated Use products as the designer intends 10 Who is the User? An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

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13 Users may have temporary or permanent functional limitations that interfere with or prevent access to a product. For example: Low vision (need large print, high contrast colors) Blindness Low hearing (need louder, clear, lower frequency sounds) Deaf When barriers are eliminated, blind people can circulate autonomously 12 Who is the User? An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

14 Cognitive functional limitations (Wide range of conditions – from difficulty learning to difficulty remembering to reading problems, etc.) Mobility Disabilities Amputation … but we all grow old. 13 Who is the User? An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

15 In addition, users without disabilities may be using a product in circumstances that cause them to behave as if they did: Performing simultaneous tasks (such as driving - reducing attention, memory, reaction time) Environment (temperature, weather) Protective gear (reducing dexterity) Infants and pregnant women 14 Who is the User? An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

16 15 UD in Housing An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

17 1) Equitable use The design is useful to people with diverse abilities --Multiple-height counters --Non-slip cutting surfaces --Wider doorways 16 7 Principles of Universal Design An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

18 2) Flexibility in use The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences & abilities --Pull-out pantries & drawers --Railings down both sides of the stairs --Curbless shower 17 7 Principles of Universal Design An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

19 18 7 Principles of Universal Design An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti 3) Simple & intuitive use Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the users experience, knowledge, language skills or current concentration level --Stepless entrance --Offset water controls in the shower & tub Atlanta Habitat for Humanity house

20 19 7 Principles of Universal Design An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti 4) Perceptible information The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the users sensory abilities --Large dial on telephone --Large signage

21 20 7 Principles of Universal Design An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti 5) Tolerance for error The design minimizes hazards & the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions --Crank or power-operated counter system --Texturized lever handles Needs protection closer to the floor surface to prevent wheelchair front tires from rolling over

22 21 7 Principles of Universal Design An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti 6) Low physical effort The design can be used efficiently & comfortably & with a minimum of fatigue --Lever door handles --Light switches Electrical outlets 18 --Removable cabinet fronts --Front-loading washer & dryer

23 22 7 Principles of Universal Design An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti 7) Size & space for approach & use Appropriate size & space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation & use regardless of users body size, posture or mobility --Entry door of 36 minimum width --Interior doors of 32 clearance --Hallway width of 42 minimum

24 An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

25 Provision of sufficient space for wheelchair users or people using other equipment, Installment of easy-to-use amenities at a convenient height Provision of adequate handrails and grab bars to assist people moving from a wheelchair or people with reduced strength 24 Application: Bathroom An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti Wood Bathroom

26 Lowered mirror Non-slip flooring The height of washbasins should be between 0.80 m and 0.85mabove floor finish Continuous flooring under lavatory Raised toilet 25 An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti Application: Bathroom Toilette made of straw

27 Accessible Shelter An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti Shelter sites and temporary housing should be made accessible to all community members using the universal standard design of accessibility (such as building ramps, installing handrails, modifying water and sanitation sources and making other modifications) to ensure the sites will be accessible to all

28 Accessible Shelter (cont.) An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti People with disabilities and other vulnerable populations should be included in this development process to ensure their needs are accounted for. It has been shown that in community-based and managed shelters or camps, disaster- affected individuals (including people with disabilities) feel more comfortable and take ownership over the site.

29 Without being able to access the facilities and services found in the community, persons with disabilities and other vulnerable populations will never be fully included. In most societies, however, there are innumerable obstacles and barriers that hinder their participation It is necessary to eliminate obstacles and barriers to indoor and outdoor facilities including schools, medical facilities and workplaces. These would include not only buildings, but also footpaths, curb cuts, and obstacles that block the flow of pedestrian traffic 28 to Public Spaces An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti Accessibility

30 29 Fire hydrant in the middle of the curb ramp An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti with this picture What Wrong

31 4 max projection Cane detectable Leading edge 27 max above floor \ in path of travel An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti Protruding objects

32 Firm Stable Slip-resistant 31 Surfaces An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

33 Changes in level max 1/4 32 Surfaces An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

34 Gratings max 1/2 opening elongated opening should be perpendicular to path of dominant travel 33 Surfaces An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

35 Restripping Parking lots # spaces Access aisle Access route Signage 34 Universal symbol not required Parking An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

36 1:12 max 35 Curb Ramps Street Resurfacing: An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

37 Routes with slopes exceeding 1:20 must meet requirements for ramps Max slope 1:12, 1:16 preferred 36 Ramps An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

38 Landing areas where ramps change direction 37 Ramps An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

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40 Call buttons Within reach range Raised & Braille Clear floor space Enter & maneuver within reach of controls & exit Elevators An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

41 Signage indicating location of accessible features when not all features are accessible Entrances An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

42 Installation of an Accessible unit or equivalent Cup dispenser Water cooler Drinking Fountains An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

43 Door cannot swing into clear floor space at fixtures Toilet centerline 18 Flush control to wide side of toilet stall Seat height Grab bars high Dispenser below side grab bar so not to obstruct use of grab bar Public bathrooms An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

44 Exposed pipes & surfaces Insulated or configured to protect against contact Faucets within reach range operable w/one hand (closed fist test) less than 5 lbs force to operate Lavatory An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

45 Flash rate Audible & visual 44 Alarms An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

46 Identifying permanent rooms and spaces Raised letters Braille Finish & contrast Mounting location & height 45 Signage An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti

47 The rehabilitation of water supply and sanitation systems should do more than merely restore disaster- affected facilities back to the situation that existed before the disaster. They should contribute to reducing vulnerability 46 and Sanitation Access to Water An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti Accessible Tubewell

48 Important aspects to consider are Water supply, access and use Drawing, transporting, storing water Access to stored water Bathing and washing clothing and dishes 47 and Sanitation (cont.) Access to Water An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti photos are from Jones, H. And Reed, R. (2005) photos are from Jones, H. And Reed, R. (2005) photos are from Jones, H. And Reed, R. (2005)

49 Structures of sanitation such as hygienic latrines can be also designed in a way that facilitates their use by people with mobility limitations 48 and Sanitation (cont.) Access to Water An Initiative of the GPDD Working Group on Haiti photos are from Jones, H. And Reed, R. (2005)

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