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Michele Barbera, Matteo DAlfonso, Francesca Di Donato Quick Start Guide To create digital scholarly communities on the web COST Action A32.

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Presentation on theme: "Michele Barbera, Matteo DAlfonso, Francesca Di Donato Quick Start Guide To create digital scholarly communities on the web COST Action A32."— Presentation transcript:

1 Michele Barbera, Matteo DAlfonso, Francesca Di Donato Quick Start Guide To create digital scholarly communities on the web COST Action A32

2 Michele Barbera, Matteo DAlfonso, Francesca Di Donato Target Scholars who are not digitally literate Small and local digitisation projects who want to grow

3 Michele Barbera, Matteo DAlfonso, Francesca Di Donato Organization Three parts on: Three editors who: wrote a skeleton run the website incorporate your contributions contents technology legal and social

4 Michele Barbera, Matteo DAlfonso, Francesca Di Donato Draft website Just parked there. Will be moved to another domain soon.

5 Michele Barbera, Matteo DAlfonso, Francesca Di Donato We need your help Forum Post your modification, corrections, ideas on the forum!

6 Matteo DAlfonso University of Bologna (Italy) This work is released under a CC licenced under a CC licence Corpus & community An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide Section 1

7 Matteo DAlfonso - Title of content: choose your corpus An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 1 Choose your corpus By corpus we mean a given set of items relevant for your community, such as works or handwritten documents of a writer, philosopher, poet etc., as well as books or articles written on her work, her life etc.. Most of the communities using Talia focus on literary remains containing handwritten documents.

8 Matteo DAlfonso - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Do you need images of your corpus? Contact the owner, e. g. archive, museum, foundation etc. Contact the owner or a private company to digitalise the corpus. Schopenhauersource worked well with the following company: Mikro Universe GmBH.

9 Matteo DAlfonso - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Naming the images: digital classification The names you will choose should become suffixes of the URL of your website and so contribute to set the URLs for each single pages showing the contents These names will then be useful for both citing the sources of your research and navigating through them in the website. is the URL for the first page (1r) of the first book (NL-I) of Schopenhauer's handwritings.

10 Matteo DAlfonso - Title of content: choose your corpus An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 1 Characteristics of the names Since they will be part of an URL these names will have to be compatible with requirements of the Web (see: Stability of the URL). Only use characters that are compatible with the syntax of an URL. This URL will be cited by scholars, who already have standards for citing primary and secondary sources for their studies The naming schema should be compatible with this scholarly tradition.

11 Matteo DAlfonso - Title of content: choose your corpus An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 1 Publishing the naming schema Since you have established your naming schema you have to publish it as a separate contribution and also document the classification criteria you followed for generating it. In order to ensure the maximal interoperability between your platform, other editions of your corpus and the secondary literature, publish a table of concordances with other existing classifications.

12 Matteo DAlfonso - Title of content: choose your corpus An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 1 Involve your community Activate an electronic, open access publishing system. Ask your colleagues to contribute to the classification, the production of editions, other scholarly contributions etc. Create an editorial board. Establish the rules for accepting contributions. Establish the kind of contributions you will accept. Establish the format of the contributions. Establish the editorial rules. Select a model licence to rule the relations between your platform and the authors. The names of peer-reviewers, rules and criteria, licence you've chosen have to be explicitly listed and published on an web page containing the documentation of your platform.

13 Michele Barbera Netseven (Italy) This work is released under a CC Attribution Share Alike 3.0 Unported Licenseed under a CC Attribution Share Alike 3.0 Unported License section 2: technology An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide Section 2

14 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Summary Intro Digitising your sources Preparing your digital objects for publication Setting up your infrastructure Publishing your content

15 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Introduction Types of content As of today the infrastructure is ready to publish: Images Videos XML texts In this first version of the guide we focus only on images

16 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Digitising your sources Two alternatives Long term preservation This is the best option, but it is more expensive. For the web Set of minimum requirements. Two options: in house or subcontracted.

17 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Setting up the platform computing service of the institution partner library commercial hosting Finding a host

18 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Talia a framework, a set of programming libraries to help programmers but there are customizations: user interface + data model (ontology) the discovery customization is ready to use What is it? How? Everything is Open Source do it yourself subcontract to a professional, list

19 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Discovery customization Facsimile (IIP) XML editions CMS and Exist based search engine are external apps OAI-PMH Features

20 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Generic Talia 1.0 Load your own ontology New UI, completely customizable Integration with external tools: Juxta, Opencalais Alternative search engine Integration with backend application? Full integration with philospace November 2009, features:

21 Michele Barbera - Title of technical: digitising your sources An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 2 Links Source code: Docs: Installation:: Talia repository and docs

22 Francesca Di Donato University of Pisa (Italy) This work is released under a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 3.0 Unported Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 3.0 Unported License Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide Section 3

23 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Topics of sect. 3 The Legal framework The Economic framework The Social framework

24 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 1. Legal framework: Know your rights

25 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 What is copyright? Copyright means that an owners right to an original work of literature, music and art is legally protected. In practice.. it gives the owner exclusive rights to how his/her work is used, i.e. to do or to authorize copying and public distribution or performance of any kind. its duration depends on when and where the work was created.

26 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 © in * Source communities The system of copyright which acts in the creation and maintenance of an Open Scholarly Community on the Web entails different objects: primary sources (manuscripts, their digitization - i.e. images); secondary sources (editions, articles, books and essays as well as the project web sites contents).

27 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Primary/ secondary sources: to be or not to be? But primary sources and secondary source are not legal definitions. Copyright law only outlines: what is a protected work what is a work in the public domain what is a derivative work whether there are other copyright-related rights on a work Legally speaking, the relevant distinction is that between original works and derivative works.

28 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Original works Copyright on original works lasts in general 70 years after the death of the author. After that date, that work is in the public domain, i.e. monetary rights on that work expired. Practically, this means that we can use it freely (without paying any fee nor asking authorization). Although each EU state member has its own copyright system, common guidelines are described in several EU Directives (See

29 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Table: Copyright in European legislations See:

30 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Table: Copyright in European legislations See:

31 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Derivative works A derivative work is protected autonomously. Examples: an adaptation, an arrangement, a transcription, a new version, a translation, etc, of a previous work. The fact that a work is in the Public Domain does not mean that also the version or translation that you are interested in is freely available. Critical and scientific publications are publications of Public Domain works with a critical or scientific reconstruction, or organization of the work, or description.

32 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 a) Manuscripts Manuscripts are original works. If you intend to embark upon a digitization project, you need to be aware that you must investigate the copyright situation involved for each item that you intend to scan. We have several good experiences (see NietzscheSource and SchopenhauerSource) which prove that it is possible to obtain the right to digitize the manuscripts. For help, contact our existing communities.

33 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 b) Facsimiles Digitization means that collections and holdings can be given wider access. Therefore, you must consider and decide about the legal conditions for making digital copies. We recommend that access to the digital collection is reliant upon acknowledgement of a copyright disclaimer. Provide copyright information about your facsimiles on your web site.

34 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 c) Editions Editions are derivative works. In Europe, copyright on editions is regulated by art. 5 of the Term Directive (Council Directive 93/98/EEC of 29 October 1993). Art. 5 Critical and scientific publications Member States may protect critical and scientific publications of works which have come into the public domain. The maximum term of protection of such rights shall be 30 years from the time when the publication was first lawfully published.

35 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Important note We strongly encourage our Action members to adopt an Open Access policy 1. self-archiving their results in OA institutional and disciplinary archives, 2. publishing them in OA journals (see sect. 3.1.e - f) 3. and adopting copyleft licenses (such us Creative Commons), which help to increase the dissemination of scholarly works and their reuse.

36 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 2. Social Framework. Dissemination

37 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Build your own community How is an Open Scholarly Community on the Web organized? Firstly, it makes use of web-based tools to communicate, i.e. to archive, spread and certify data and results. So, a useful starting point is for staff to visit sites of similar projects to see what features work well and what tools are most useful for scholars.

38 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Build your own community Secondly, it needs specific technological and legal expertises. Open scholarly communities on the Web are by definition interdisciplinary. In addition to scientific skills, they require expertise in: 1. website management; 2. rights management; 3. project management; 4. purely scholars. People who have skills in more than one of these fields will be appreciated.

39 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Todo list 1. Look for European research teams on your corpus It is very important for your community to promote networking with other related scholarly communities. As in traditional communities, on the Web a high degree of scientific discussion and connections will improve the quality of your results. The goal to create connections between scholars of EU countries is one of the main objectives of COST program. Our Action promotes this goal by organizing workshops and meetings, and through STSMs.

40 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Todo list 2. Contact similar sites The Web is a small world. Increasing relevant connections will make it easy for others interested in your corpus or subject to find you. Contacting similar sites will also your improve your chances of creating new projects and cooperations in Europe and abroad. To find out about similar projects dont restrict yourself to Google. Ask colleagues (by or at conferences), look on usenet discussion groups, use local search engines, ecc. Make sure you update and enrich your web site: it's the best way to become more visible on the Web.

41 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Todo list 3. Link your website from: a. your personal homepage/blog b. your institution website c. your library website d. wikipedia e. open access archives directories and DOAJ directory

42 Francesca Di Donato - Legal, Economic and Social Framework An Introduction to the Quick Start Guide - Section 3 Conclusions The Quick Start Guide alpha is available here: We still need to: 1. enrich this Guide 2. build new communities 3. strenghten our connections with existing communities We need your help Thank you!


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