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HRB and Open Access: A Funders Perspective Patricia Clarke, HRB Senior Policy Analyst.

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Presentation on theme: "HRB and Open Access: A Funders Perspective Patricia Clarke, HRB Senior Policy Analyst."— Presentation transcript:

1 HRB and Open Access: A Funders Perspective Patricia Clarke, HRB Senior Policy Analyst

2 Public sector funding flow to health care and research Relationship between government departments and funders of health research in Ireland Department of Health Department of Finance Department of Education & Skills Department of Jobs, Enterprise & Innovation Department of the Environment Community & Local Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries & Food

3 2010 Health-related Research Expenditure Research funding provider Total R&D expenditure 2010 Health-related research expenditure 2010 % of total spent on health-related 000 % Health Research Board40, Science Foundation Ireland171,29073, Health Services Executive *** Higher Education Authority111,29236,85933 Environmental Protection Agency13, Marine Institute9,6601, IRCSET25,6003, IRCHSS14,4001, Dept. Health and Children 5, Dept. Agriculture, Food & Fisheries15,2604, Enterprise Ireland93,46014, Industrial Development Authority56,66823, TOTAL 556,638205,

4 HRB strategy – four strategic goals 1. Drive the development of excellent clinical research within a coherent health research system. 2. Build the capacity to conduct high-quality population health sciences and health services research. 3. Work with key partners to develop and manage high-quality national health information systems. 4. Generate evidence and promote the application of knowledge to support decision making by policy- makers and practitioners.

5 HRB Principles Publicly-funded research should be made available and accessible for public use as rapidly as possible Outputs should be peer reviewed Models and mechanisms used must be a cost- effective use of public funds Outputs must be preserved and remain accessible.

6 HRB position Requires authors to maximise the opportunities to make their results available for free Encourages authors to archive all research papers – funded in whole or in part by the HRB–in open access repositories as soon as possible following final publication Encourages authors and publishers to licence research papers such that they may be freely copied and reused.

7 526 peer reviewed pubs 80% high/ med impact 1300 scientific meetings (52 Key notes) 380+ collaborations – 2/3rds internat. 112 novel techniques - 26 were new to the world 7 Clinician Scientists 84 post docs 106 post grad completions 25% in PHS and HSR 40 healthcare professionals up skilling 117 follow-on awards were secured by 41% of awardees 17 awards informed health policy 21 awardees appointed as policy advisors 30 awards improved treatments, services interventions & guidelines 18 awards developed innovations for health service delivery or cost savings 17 awards contributing to diagnostic assays, new treatments or diagnostic tools 14 patent applications 6 awardees got market development awards 2 licencing agreements & 2 start ups 10 formal business collaborations HRB Outputs

8 Grant Holder Pool Total Number of grants = 1129Number of unique grant holders = 735

9 Researchers self- archive Journal OA costs not paid JULIET database – 50+ Funders mandates including: UKPMC Funders Group NIH HHMI CIHR

10 Why is OA publication important for Funders Just funding the research is not enough – must ensure widest possible dissemination and unrestricted access to that research Allow links and integration of outputs with other resources ( new data mining techniques) Evaluation of funded research Preservation of digital record of health research Greater access =greater impact of research

11 Issues to be resolved Policies in place but to realise full potential of OA still need: More comprehensive and linked OA infrastructure Improved compliance Improved mechanisms for researchers to meet payments Clarification (and simplification) of publisher policy Clarifying re-use rights with regard to author manuscripts

12 46 HRB Host Institutions Health Services Charities NGOs etc Links to national picture Access to Infrastructure

13 Improving compliance Problem in part – authors not self-archiving Mitigated by awareness raising, and articulating consequences of non-compliance… part, publishers not having workflows to support author pays model. Elsevier – who have recently introduced an integrated OA workflow – have seen significant increase in uptake of Sponsored Documents

14 Clarifying publishers OA policy Nuances of policy – bewildering to the researcher No fee, no embargo – but full & immediate OA (e.g. BMJ research papers) No fee, full OA, but 6 months embargo (e.g. Rockefeller Press) Author-side payment – fully compliant (e.g. Elsevier, Wiley) Author side payments – NOT compliant (e.g. AJTMH) Self-archiving – must archive author version (e.g. AAAS ) Self-archiving – must archive publisher version (e.g. NEJM) Self archiving – not compliant (as embargo too long) (e.g. AAN) /

15 Future Plans HRB Reviewing OA costs and infrastructure Preparing HRB policies on wider dissemination and on research data National level Funders Meeting June 2012 European level ESF/ EMCR Science Policy Briefing Open Access in Biomedical Research July 2012 Science Europe Working Group - Publication service models and costs, research data

16 Funder Initiatives Leadership – demonstrate engagement with issues, raise awareness and compliance in research community Fund – cost of publications. Estimated investment required to deliver full OA is 1-2% of research spend (marginal to research costs). Copyright – encourage (and eventually enforce) author retention (involve publishers) Evaluation – recognise intrinsic value of content of paper rather than title of journal OA research data

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