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Drawing and applying poverty maps The Hungarian case Open Society Foundations Making the Most of EU Funds for Roma initiative 11 Nov 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Drawing and applying poverty maps The Hungarian case Open Society Foundations Making the Most of EU Funds for Roma initiative 11 Nov 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Drawing and applying poverty maps The Hungarian case Open Society Foundations Making the Most of EU Funds for Roma initiative 11 Nov 2011

2 Settlement (LAU2, NUTS5) or sub-settlement Micro-region (LAU1, NUTS4) settlements in HU; average population besides Bp 2.500; sub-settlement level for those over settlements in HU; population besides Bp aim: classification of segregated areas; share of people without more than primary education and without employment over 50% aim: classification of all areas; 80 more developed, 47 less developed (below average), 14 least developed (bottom 15%), 33 least developed with integrated programme (bottom 10%) 2 social indicators31 social, economic and infrastructural indicators used for integrated urban development strategies, etc. used for the integrated programme of the less developed micro-regions, etc. Mapping at 2 levels

3 Indicators Settlement level: 2 social: education (primary school), employment Micro-region level: 14 social: 6 income, property, demography, etc.: income, flat, car, migration, mortality, urbanisation 5 poverty, etc.: education (secondary school), unemployed households, social assistance, child protection assistance, aging index 3 employment: unemployment, long term unemployment, activity 8 economic: number and change in number of enterprises, agriculture, services, tourism, retail, research, tax income 9 infrastructural: piped water, sewage, gas, waste collection, road and motorway accessibility, phone, cable TV, broadband internet Foreseen change: smaller number of indicators, more focus on social indicators

4 Indicators – *census data Settlement level: 2 social: education (primary school)*, employment Micro-region level: 14 social: 6 income, property, demography, etc.: income, flat, car, migration, mortality, urbanisation 5 poverty, etc.: education (secondary school)*, unemployed households*, social assistance, child protection assistance, aging index 3 employment: unemployment, long term unemployment, activity* 8 economic: number and change in number of enterprises, agriculture*, services*, tourism, retail, research, tax income 9 infrastructural: piped water, sewage, gas, waste collection, road and motorway accessibility, phone, cable TV, broadband internet Foreseen change: smaller number of indicators, more focus on social indicators

5 Result

6 dark green:least developed micro-regions with integrated programme (33) medium green: least developed micro-regions (14) light green: less developed micro-regions (47) striped:micro-regions with high rate of Roma, census data (44)

7 AreaPopulationPeople without more than primary education and without employment Ózd % Segregated area no % Segregated area no % Segregated area no % Segregated area no % Ózd, Hungary

8 Segregated area no 7, Ózd, Hungary

9 Territorial targeting of funds with equal opportunities guarantees Territorial targeting can be effective in allocating funds to areas with high concentration of marginalised communities, including Roma (without allocating funds on ethnic ground) Without strong equal opportunities guarantees, marginalised communities and especially Roma can be excluded even from targeted programmes – well known mechanisms generate exclusion both in central administration and on local level Territorial targeting should be combined with equal opportunities policy and organisational guarantees – Central administration: e.g. equality unit – Local level: e.g. equal opportunities plans, network of experts See interim evaluation Where the Paved Road Ends on our website

10 Beyond funds Once target areas are defined, these can be used for many fields beyond funds E.g. some EU2020 targets (school drop-out rate, employment rate, people in poverty) can benefit marginalised communities, including Roma, if these are better focused This better focus can be based on social and/or territorial indicators In order to ensure that level of equality will be increased or at least kept, the EU could monitor progress towards the EU2020 targets also in target areas, and require from member states at least the same level of progress in target areas as at national level – E.g. if school drop-out rate decreases by 5% at national level, it should decrease at least by 5% in target areas; if employment rate increases by 10% at national level, it should increase at least by 10% in target areas

11 Thanks for your attention


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